pint4

1937 Packard 120 Questions

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I have a few questions that I need some help with.  In 1937, did the 1937 Packard 120 Convertible Coupe have "plush pile" or "square weave" carpeting?  Were the top bows in the convertible top cloth wrapped?For the introduction of the new models in 37, there was a paint color referred to as the "announcement color", which was Indian Maroon.  The reference book says for the announcement color paint, the interior was red leather. I have looked at red leather material and there is every shade imaginable, does any one know the actual correct color and could you direct me to where I can find it.  The rear window in the convertible top is chrome plated on the outside.  Was the inside chrome plated or was it painted?  If it was painted, what color was it painted?  I am hopeful there are a few Packard experts that can help answer these questions.  I am guessing it would be the same persons who judge Packards at the meets.

Thanks,

Bob

Email:  pint4@new.rr.com

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In 1937, did the 1937 Packard 120 Convertible Coupe have "plush pile" or "square weave" carpeting

 

 

Neither.  More like hogshair.

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Bob:  I am not a Packard judge, nor do I want to be, but I have been around these cars for a long time and have done lots of research.  Hopefully these answer your questions.

 

1. Unlike the sedans, the 1937 120 Convertible Coupe had no carpeting.  Instead it had a black rubber mat.  When you think about it, this makes sense.  Back in the day when these cars were used for everyday driving, if you got caught in a rain storm with the top down the leather seats would wipe off but if there were carpeting it would be soaked and hard to dry out.

 

I purchased my convertible from the original owner and it had never been restored.  It only had a black rubber mat with jute underlayment and there was a pattern in the mat.  But we, the current owners of these convertibles, only drive them on nice days so we elect to install carpeting.  So I would say which ever carpeting you like would be Packard-incorrect but nice for you to display at shows.

 

2. The top bows are not cloth wrapped.  Instead, talking with Packard junior experts for my research, Packard painted the bows (including the header bow) a gawd-awful looking green, sort of a light pale green.  But, according to Darvin Kuehl in his book “The Production Packard” he said Packard painted these “Dawn Gray.”  So I don't know which color would be correct:

 

http://paintref.com/cgi-bin/paintdetail.cgi?paintx=1937%7CPackard%7CDawn%20Gray%7C1874

 

* * * Update * * * I was just told that Dawn Gray actually has a greenish tint to it, like a gray-green.

 

3. Packard’s code for the Indian Maroon paint is Z.  According to my documentation, paint code Z had tan leather upholstery with a Gold Bronze pin stripe and Indian Maroon wheels.  But, my documentation also says red leather, No. 124, was an option for any paint scheme.  I don’t know what 124 is nor which shade of red leather was used.

 

4. Again referring to Darvin’s book, the inside of the rear window was painted Dawn Gray while the outside was chrome.  Also note that the convertible sedan and the convertible coupe used two different window/frame sizes: 5” wide for the sedan and 3-1/2” wide for the coupe.  But Darvin does say some dealers installed the sedan window in the '36 and '37 convertibles . . . I assume to give the driver more vision.

Edited by packick (see edit history)

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I note in Kuehl's book (Section 5) that wool carpeting was available for the 115, 120B and 120C convertibles at extra cost. Though it may be wool as Darvin stated, those samples I've seen that were said to be original were a very short nap, hence my description as more like hogshair.

Edited by Owen_Dyneto (see edit history)

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Owen_Dyneto:

 

The rain theory is mine, but my supporting theory for that theory is that the poor Junior owners commuted every day in their cars (read "rain or shine") whereas the rich Senior owners probably didn't commute every day and only took them out now and then (read "sunny days").  But that theory is not based on any facts or data, so what do I know?

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No 124 leather is red. If you look at Packard sales literature, red was optional with all paint colors. Packard was in the business of selling cars, not making rules. Jr leather was different than Sr leather also.

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I got an email from one of my Junior Packard guru contacts who is very knowledgeable on the 1937 120s.  Here are his comments:

 

1.  Window Frame

 

I think most cars (115C & 120C coupe convertibles) had their tops replaced, so it’s hard to tell unless the car was found stored for most of its life.  The rear window frame was most likely painted on the inside, but who knows for sure? 

 

2. Red Leather

 

As for the No.124 red leather, I have a 1938 leather sample book (which has the same leather numbers as 1937) and the red No.124 is a rather dull red textured leather.  In fact all leather samples in the book are not very bright, but I might say Packard conservative colors.  The senior leathers have less texture in the samples than the junior cars, or more pronounced texture, but all samples are textured.

 

3. Floor Mats

 

Yes, rubber floor mats were only used, as the parts book only has a part number for the mat, nothing else listed. 

 

4. Indian Maroon Paint

 

I often questioned the Indian Maroon, as I have never come across that color, in any Packard literature (maybe someone could clue me in on that colors introductory use). Another thing I see on many restored 1089 and 1099 cars have the dash backgound color painted body color.  The only correct color it should be is the super dark brown they used on that and the steering mast jacket and the emergency handle (not the release part).

 

5. Dawn Gray

 

Dawn Gray is close to the color of split pea soup.

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