Jump to content

Cone Clutches


D Binger
 Share

Recommended Posts

I purchased a 1914 Buick in '89 with a Kevlar clutch face. It jerked, snapped my neck and was generally a terrible clutch. After a Reliability Tour that must have had over 100 stop signs per day, most of which I slid through because I didn't want to have to start from a dead stop again, I came home and Dan Binger and I replaced the clutch with a leather faced one from another '14 Buick I owned. Since the leather was good it was easier than relining the Kevlar faced one. Since then the car has been an absolute pleasure to drive, even through multiple stop signs. However, there are 2 things you must do for that leather faced clutch. Keep it well lubricated with neetsfoot oil and use a clutch block when not driving the car for more than a day or too. smile.gif ~ hvs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dan, I never had any experiences with using Kevlar in place of leather in cone clutches. It does make sence as to what Howard is saying about the kevlar causing the car to jerk. I would like driving one with it sometime to see.<BR>I have replaced Model T bands with kevlar lining though and so far everyone seems to be very pleased. I may start recommending it to those who are just learning to drive T's.<P>Rick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gents, I have been manufacturing Model T transmission linings made from woven Kevlar for many years. We call our linings NEV-R-WEAR and have had very good success with our product, so I think I speak from a position of experience. The one thing that makes Kevlar succesfull in a Model T is the oil that bathes the bands. In a dry application kevlar is terrible. We have given kevlar bands to owners of Model NRS Fords and they tell us that the linings rip off the bands in less than 100 miles. In light of this, I would not recommend kevlar in any dry transmission. If anyone has been successfull using kevlar in a cone clutch, then you have been fortunate, but when customers ask me for my opinion, I suggest they use leather in a cone clutch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why don't one of you guys enlighten the uniformed, like myself. What is a cone clutch? I can envision two cones that fit inside one another, one bare steel and the other with the lining you are speaking of. I assume that releasing is done similarly to modern pressure plates by axial movement of one of the cones. Am I close?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hal ~ You hit the nail right on the head.<P>Actually it is not a complete cone, but a segment thereof. On a '14 Buick it is about 3 to 4'wide. The rear half is connected to the drive shaft and the front portion is actually the inside of the flywheel. When disengaged the rear portion pulls back less than an inch which is enough for the flywheel to turn but not contact the leather faced rear section. It is a nice smooth clutch when properly lubricated but a bear when dried out. Kevlar sucks!<P>oldford ~ Thanks for your insight as to why Kevlar is no good in this application.<P>hvs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had the same thoughts regarding the use of Kevlar for cone clutchs and I didn?t<BR>want to give misinformation about them to anyone. (I don?t like misinformation)<BR>I have been wondering if Kevlar isn?t flexible enough to allow the cone clutch plunger studs to operate properly? This might be the reason for a Kevlar facing to be<BR>unsatisfactory. After all, the plunger studs are what pushes out on the facing to give the first and last contact when the clutch is engaged and disengaged. If Kevlar isn?t flexible enough to give - - this might be the cause of the grabby clutch - - no smooth transition<BR>when the clutch is being operated.<BR>Tom Reese?s book ?Restoration Tips? published by AACA is very helpful along with<BR>?Dykes? manuals, but no mention of Kevlar - - -for good reason. It wasn?t around when<BR>these were published.<P>I would like to hear more about the use of Kevlar for Model T bands. <P>Dan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kevlar is unsuitable for dry applications because it has very poor abrasion characteristics. In simpler terms, it can't take the scuffing that occurrs when the clutch is slipped or engaged slowly. That is the reason it wears poorly in a cone clutch. Its strength is in the length of the fiber, not in the width, hence it tears. The reason kevlar is suitable in Ford transmissions, is the fact that oil is present. The oil simply lubricates the kevlar to allow slippage. Heat is not the problem in either dry or wet applications, since kevlar can withstand temperatures in excess of 1200 degrees F. Hope this short explanation helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had a kevelar clutch in my 1913 Overland for 6 years and have driven many miles without any problems,no adjustment,no neets-foot oil,no fullers earth.It works smoothe as silk[Dan Binger has driven the car and should agree with my assesment]Had installed a kevelar clutch in a 1912 Oakland and it was grabby tried to lubricate it to make it mope user friendly and after many cans of brake cleaner it is not slipping any more[its back to grabbing]who is to figgure.If I were to put a kevelar clutch in another car? good question!!!! Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...