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I'm looking for new rear springs for my 1989 8v do the Lebaron GTC springs fit? or does any one have a moog part number

Thanks

You most likely have less than 279,000 miles on your TC, which I have on mine, so why do you feel you need new springs? LeBaron springs will fit, by the way, though they have a different spring rate.

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You most likely have less than 279,000 miles on your TC, which I have on mine, so why do you feel you need new springs? LeBaron springs will fit, by the way, though they have a different spring rate.

Thanks Hemi for the reply, I have noticed two things, one not a lot of clearance between the tire and the top of the inner fender and looks like their is some tire rubbing. Going too replace the shocks at the same time seems the ride is getting a rough.

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Thanks Hemi for the reply, I have noticed two things, one not a lot of clearance between the tire and the top of the inner fender and looks like their is some tire rubbing. Going too replace the shocks at the same time seems the ride is getting a rough.

Replacing the shock absorbers is a good thing. I speak for myself, but if you want the Boulevard ride of a TC, don't get HD shocks. Just standard duty will be fine.

As for the tire rubbing, having been a mechanic at the dealer 29 years and having my own shop for 22 years, I will tell you that there are times when the tires will rub the top of the wheel well and that is not a problem. Your rear springs are most likely just fine. Installing stiffer springs such as from another car or KYB will give you a firmer 'harder' ride. If that is what you want, fine.

It is your car to do with what you like and want.

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Replacing the shocks (dampers) shouldn't really have an effect on the ride height. Only the springs will. It seems that the rear of most 80's Chrysler FWD cars have a "saggy bottom" look. I would suggest checking out the spring isolators before replacing the springs themselves. The isolators break down over time and "lower" the car. Johnny at polybushings.com sells replacement isolators made out of polyurethane. The stock parts are rubber with a steel core that rusts and disintegrates over the years.

 

As for the rubbing, is it only happening on one side? If so, check the panhard bar (aka track bar). Sometimes they get a kink in them for some reason or another and can cause the rear axle to be out of alignment.

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Replacing the shocks (dampers) shouldn't really have an effect on the ride height. Only the springs will. It seems that the rear of most 80's Chrysler FWD cars have a "saggy bottom" look. I would suggest checking out the spring isolators before replacing the springs themselves. The isolators break down over time and "lower" the car. Johnny at polybushings.com sells replacement isolators made out of polyurethane. The stock parts are rubber with a steel core that rusts and disintegrates over the years.

 

As for the rubbing, is it only happening on one side? If so, check the panhard bar (aka track bar). Sometimes they get a kink in them for some reason or another and can cause the rear axle to be out of alignment.

thanks for the info I will check those things out and just replacing the shocks because they need it

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Replacing the shocks (dampers) shouldn't really have an effect on the ride height. Only the springs will. It seems that the rear of most 80's Chrysler FWD cars have a "saggy bottom" look. I would suggest checking out the spring isolators before replacing the springs themselves. The isolators break down over time and "lower" the car. Johnny at polybushings.com sells replacement isolators made out of polyurethane. The stock parts are rubber with a steel core that rusts and disintegrates over the years.

 

As for the rubbing, is it only happening on one side? If so, check the panhard bar (aka track bar). Sometimes they get a kink in them for some reason or another and can cause the rear axle to be out of alignment.

Let's not confuse the issue. Who has indicated that shock absorbers, that is what they are called, have anything to do with ride hight? We are not talking about "Load-Levelers" such as those for old RWD cars.

And, just how often does the panhard bar, aka Track-Bar get bent, tweeted or otherwise molested on a TC? Rarely, unless some fool tries to jack the car up by placing a jack under the 'rear crossmember'. Even then it is difficult to reach the track bar. As for the polyurethane spring isolators. They are firmer, they are better on performance cars, but here again RockAuto.com does sell original equipment replacements, AND if you want to raise the rear a little, add 2 under each rear spring. Even 3 if you wish, especially if you find that one side is lower than the other.

We are not running NASCAR here, just a basic Q body FWD Chrysler car. I have scuff marks on both sides in the upper rear fender wells on my TC, I could not care less. It does not matter. I know how that occurs. 

I know well, that there are those who wish to make their TC into some sort of road racer. That's all well and good, I have an 85 Chrysler Laser for that.

We are on the club pages of the TC America Car Club, there are other places here at AACA for the racers to chat.

Just the opinion of a 50+ year Chrysler Tech who has 'Been there, Done that'. I'm not 20 and most readers here are not either.

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I was merely addressing a common misconception that replacing the shock absorbers (dampers, as in spring oscillation dampers) somehow have an affect on ride height. I wasn't trying to suggest that our stock replacements did anything more than that. (not be be confusing, but you can get air shocks from Gabriel that will fit...I don't suggest it for these cars). 

 

You would be surprised at how many track bars I've seen kinked or bent under other "pedestrian" versions of FWD Chryslers. They aren't very solid and only takes a little bit to tweak it. I would agree that trying to jack the car up from that part would be one of the common things that causes this situation. I believe there is actually an aftermarket factory style replacement available.

 

The spring isolators *might* increase some NVH due to a higher durometer, but the factory parts have steel inserts in them, so it's hard to say how that type of performance would be affected. I was simply trying to offer another option for replacement parts that also supports one of our niche market vendors. The polyurethane isolators really aren't a "performance" part so much as a replacement part made out of a different material. I actually have run 2 factory isolators in the rear on my '88 Shelby Z. It works nicely when you want to make up some ride height. I used this trick when I drove up to SDAC18.

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