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Nickel or Chrome


RHorton
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I have a nickel era 1928 Packard that I am restoring. I know the judging rules indicate that plating should be "as manufactured".  I have many small interior parts that have to be plated.  Chrome resists tarnishing much better than nickel and I would like to know what kind of penalty I would incur for having small items chromed rather than nickeled.  Also the kind of nickel plating called hard nickel is brighter but not chrome.  Is it allowed?  Large items such as headlights, radiator shells etc would be nickeled, but I am just interested in chroming small items.

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I suspect that you are trying to restore this classic correctly and probably spending a pretty penny doing so, so why would you want to deviate from the original just for the sake of a little extra polishing. In a world where truly  authentic restorations of many vehicles is becoming a thing of the past, I would think that it would behoove you to do the job as accurately as you can; it may make a big difference to a collector if and when you chose to sell, which I would think would be more important that a few judging points. Just my opinion

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I agree guys, put the car back the way it was 100%. If it was nickel then do nickel. I just had my alemite grease fittings re-nickled because they were originally. Sure I could by new alemites for the car in the correct style for the year, but the new ones would not have the original 1919 patent date on it. I see a number of cars that are being restored with owners making major modifications to them. Not the ones being judged, but many that are out there at shows.  I feel we are doing a injustice to future generations if we do not restore them back to the way they were.  My two cents worth.

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I would put the car back the way it was with Nickel.

 

We owned a 1929 Packard 640 Sedan a few years ago that was mostly original with Nickel and German Silver interior trim. Packard applied a clear coat to some of the interior hardware so it would not need polished. In the owners manual they explained this and warned against cleaning the trim with any abrasives that would hurt the clear coat.

 

Perhaps you could have your parts Nickel plated and then clear coat them?

 

On the other hand I was at a show recently and saw a nickel era Cadillac that had been chromed and it just did not look right. You could tell that a lot of time and money was spent on the restoration but with the wrong finish the car just looked out of place.

 

Just my opinion,

Andy

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We owned a 1929 Packard 640 Sedan a few years ago that was mostly original with Nickel and German Silver interior trim. ...

 

Interesting trivia fact:  "German silver" contains no silver!

 

On the subject of nickel, I agree with everyone:  Replate with nickel!

The interior of a car should look nice too, and to the knowledgeable eye,

chrome will stand out as glaringly incorrect.  Nickel has a softer color.

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From a judging perspective, what about all the small fasteners?  For instance, the small wood screws that hold the running board trim or floor trim in.  Would points be deducted for having a stainless or chrome screw?  I know my car has a lot of #6 and #8 oval head wood screws that hold on the aluminum sill plates, running board and floorboard trim.  They were nickel plated steel screws originally.

Scott

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