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oldstuffguy

1940 Buick bumper?

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Hi.  Was out picking parts from an old semi-closed junkyard in the backroads of the Ozarks when I saw one end of this sticking out of an old lumber pile.  I love old cars and tend to rescue parts occasionally that have nothing to do with my projects rather than let them go to ruin.

 

I think I have narrowed it down  to 1940 Buick bumper with grill guard based on slight V shape at center of bumper (seems to be exclusive to Buick) but could be within a year either way? 

 

Thought I would throw out final confirmation to you Buick gurus..   

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Edited by oldstuffguy (see edit history)

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post-112969-0-81567200-1455469307_thumb.I think you are right.

Looks like the 2 center guards are aftermarket.

There is a hole in the center for the big guard that is supposed to go there.

Mike in Colorado

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I know pushing cars with another was common in those years, but that arrangement is a bit MUCH, IMO.

I would like to have a dollar for all the times I jumped up and down on two hooked up cars, hehe

Dale in Indy

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I know pushing cars with another was common in those years, but that arrangement is a bit MUCH, IMO.

I would like to have a dollar for all the times I jumped up and down on two hooked up cars, hehe

Dale in Indy

Haha, I was thinking he needed a couple more ;)

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"Hooked bumpers" - a blast from the past and a real PITA!

Just pushing a car to get it moved or started is real ancient history.

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Never let a bumper bolt go to waste !

 

Thanks, J.C. Whitney.

 

Mike in Colorado

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Its been so long since I pushed a car or been pushed that I had forgotten about it. It was common in the fifties, I remember the phrase "CAN YA GIMMIE A PUSH" was pretty common once. I also remember many times that your buddies would give you a push and you would "pop the clutch" in first or second gear (there was always a discussion about which was best) and hope it started. They weren't gonna do that very many times before they gave up so you had to keep it running if it fired. Nothing was worse than it almost started but it died.

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attachicon.gif100_1811.jpgI think you are right.Looks like the 2 center guards are aftermarket.There is a hole in the center for the big guard that is supposed to go there.Mike in Colorado

Hey Mike. Good to see your still kickin'! Did you ever follow through getting that reproduction center section that ya got from me for the 320 ready to reproduce? Looks like you would have a market for it here! Little off topic, sorry! Anyway, the bumper guard was Buick offered accessary almost identical to the one produced for '39s the year before. The uprights are not shaped the same as the front/center standard bumper guard and if people have not researched this, it seems more logical that it would just be comprised of two of the center guards. Buick, go figure, they manufactured stuff for such low production vehicles. I think it may stem from the fact they could produce just about anything they thought of, low production or not, cuz Detroit/Flint owned the car market with huge profit! Cheap price to protect a diecast grille! Last I checked locally they wanted 1750.00 per side to rechrome and that's if it wasn't cracked or broken, Etc! Cost vs benefit really rings the cash register on this one! Thanx oldstuffguy!

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Hi Greg,

Yup, I'm still looking down at the grass.

I kind of gave up on the idea of replicating the exhaust manifold sections.

Patterns are "way expensive" since there are no blue prints to go by and there are minor changes thru the years, so to pick one is a gamble.

Besides, you should check out "empiremotorsinc.com". They make reproductions and are down in Texas. Castings probably come from Mexico.

Mike in Colorado

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Hi Greg,Yup, I'm still looking down at the grass.I kind of gave up on the idea of replicating the exhaust manifold sections.Patterns are "way expensive" since there are no blue prints to go by and there are minor changes thru the years, so to pick one is a gamble.Besides, you should check out "empiremotorsinc.com". They make reproductions and are down in Texas. Castings probably come from Mexico.Mike in Colorado

Hey Mike

Kinda figured that about the expense when I didn't see a follow-up. We need more access to those scanners that can photo things and make metal objects with a 3-D printer, maybe the reseach cost for that tech will get paid off and lower the cost of that option, more likely Id get cured of my " Buick disease" first though. Lol! Keep em' drivin' Mike!

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