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2016 VMCCA Nickel Tour


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I will post this here and not in the Tours/Events Section as I think it will get more views here and it is not a BCA event so I don’t want to be more confusing than this already will be.

 

Like many of you, I belong to organizations in addition to the BCA.  One organization I have really enjoyed has been the VMCCA and the touring they focus on.  Can’t begin to say how much fun touring is if you have never toured with a group.  The group I belong to is the Central Nickel Age Touring Club of the VMCCA.  This is a non-regional group that tours for a week every June somewhere in the Midwest.  This is our 21st year.

 

Each year several good Buick friends join us.  This year’s Tour is no exception with Larry & Joyce Schramm and Dandy Dave planning to join the Tour.  These Tours are what are known as Hub Tours, where you stay the week in one location/hotel, the ‘Hub’, and tour out to locations each day about 100 miles round trip with printed instructions, coffee/donut stops, several lunches and dinners and most admissions at the group rate.

 

This year’s Tour will be June 12 – 17 and located in Orange, Virginia.  Interesting that Dandy Dave’s father just recently re-located to of all places, Orange, VA.  We will visit 3 President’s homes (Jefferson/Monticello, Monroe/Ash Lawn, Madison/Montpelier), a Civil War battlefield, Blue Ridge Mnt Skyline Drive, Luray Caverns just to name a few.  This is a great Tour to bring the kids or grandkids on with lots of history and great routes too.  The Group is outstanding, and really fun loving.  Special things are done for the kids too.  We get between 25 and 30 cars each year.

 

The requirements are as follows: 

- 1927 is the newest model year permitted, 1913 is the oldest.  Exceptions not permitted.

- VMCCA membership for the owner/driver but not passengers.

- Proof of vehicle insurance.

 

So, if you’ve ever thought about Touring, here’s your chance (someone invited me once way back when).  This year I am the Tour Chairman and the Group ran this Tour in 2005 and it was so well received they voted to run it again.  This is a ‘break even Tour’, the costs are kept way down.  (there are other great tours out there but I can never figure out where all the money goes and I’ve chaired 3 tours).

 

Please contact me at the email below or post a question, since others may have the same one.

 

One final comment.  Way back when, I thought, wow, I bet I will be the only Buick on one of these tours.  Ha! After Model Ts, Buick is most often the next most popular car, a testament to the quality, reliability and power of our choice of vehicle.  When Better Automobiles are Built,  . . . . .

Edited by Brian_Heil (see edit history)
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post-87864-0-82796600-1454102946_thumb.jFound a picture from a couple of years ago from this Tour Group.  Seems a (very handsome) Buick driver :P and a Ford driver both lost their hats on tour one day.  Lucky for us, the ladies on the Tour stopped at Goodwill and got us both a new hat.  Which we wore the rest of the week.

 

You'd be amazed how well this hat works.  Wear it to any public place and the crowds just disappear.  There's always an open table or booth or stool.

Edited by Brian_Heil (see edit history)
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Brian, 

 

Is the Nickel Age Tour different from VMCCA's Eastern Nickel Tour and Western Nickel Tour?

 

We would have driven this tour, except that it is the same week as the AACA Sentimental Tour in Salisbury, NC for vehicles 1928-1958.

 

I wish we could work out better scheduling  with fewer conflicts. Another example is that the VMCCA Muscle Car Tour in Oklahoma is also the same week. Yes, that is for a different era of car, but many of us have cars in several eras.

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Marty,

 

The VMCCA Eastern and Western Nickel Tours (when they have them) are National Tours and much larger.  This Tour is a small, Regional Tour.  Technically our Club is part of the VMCCA Kentucky Region and that is only because one of the Group founders was already in the Kentucky Region.

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And I fully understand the comment about Tour conflicts.  I too have cars from other decades.  I believe this is one reason the Glidden Tour continues to run in mid September.  On one hand that tour complains about not having any kids participate which is (in my opinion) because school is in its 2nd week and most are reluctant to pull kids or grandkids out for a week long tour.  On the other hand, the weather is still good, even cooler/better in some spots and the tourist traffic is way down because the kids and families are all back in school.

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Thanks Brian, I understand - 

and are we talking about Bill & Jane?

 

The Sentimental Tour also has a limited enrollment. If we cannot get in on that one, hopefully we can do the Nickel age Tour. While our 1914 Buick has a new home, the 1915 Hudson 6-40 would be a decent candidate.

 

Thanks again for all your help

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Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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Brian:

 I know we spoke of this when we visited last summer. We are hoping to be able to attend. I have some more sorting out to do with my 25-25. It made the 100 mile round trip to our car show last year but has been giving me some issues as of late. I will keep plugging along.

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Larry and Marty,

 

Hope you both get things to work out such that you can join us.  And Marty, that Hudson would fit in just fine.

 

I'm in the same boat Larry.  I have a non-charging starter/geneator where 2 of the 3 brush arms have failed and it's still on my car waiting for the S/G that I bought off Terry Wiegand some years ago (that was far better than my tired one) that is at Jason Smith's (AER) shop awaiting rebuild.  I've been running with the need to plug into a battery charger for some time and I hope to be making 'juice' on this tour.  But I also don't want to do a last minute swap either since it requires pulling the water pump shaft and distributor as you know, so lots of potential issues if I screw it up.  My hope is that Jason has my S/G apart this week.  Right Jason?

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Brian,

Sounds very similar to the 1999 Glidden Tour in that area.  We really enjoyed it and would do it again if possible.

We did the VMCCA Nickel Tour in Maine in 2004 when they said "Nickel" went thru 1934.  Like Marty we would love to do your tour if the Sentimental Tour is full   (100 car limit)

Paul

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Brian,

Sounds very similar to the 1999 Glidden Tour in that area.  We really enjoyed it and would do it again if possible.

We did the VMCCA Nickel Tour in Maine in 2004 when they said "Nickel" went thru 1934.  Like Marty we would love to do your tour if the Sentimental Tour is full   (100 car limit)

Paul

attachicon.gifDSC00067.JPG

 

PAUL,

 

This is the "NICKEL-AGE TOURING" GROUP (1913 through 1927) - a tour put on by a specialized Region, not a "VMCCA NICKEL TOUR" like the one we did in Maine. The National VMCCA Nickel back then allowed up to 1934 (like we both drove) and the Chrome started at 1935 - but that was in the past. 

 

Yes Marty, but I don't recall them having a Nickel car oddly. They lead other events as you know.

 

Brian,

 

I'm not certain, but didn't they have a late-teens Studebaker ? I know that their 1911 2-cylinder Maxwell is 2 years too early, and the '31 Buick is a bit too new

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  • 4 months later...

OK Boys and Girls, this is getting close.

 

My apologies to the fine folks of Virginia as Larry Schramm, Larry DiBarry, Dandy Dave and I invade your fine state.  Ha.  Along with 21 other vehicles and folks who like to have just as much fun as we do.

 

I think this is going to be someting special.  We will do our best to post some pics and articles of our adventure.

 

"Drive a Buick, drive the best, pass the Fords and all the rest"

Edited by Brian_Heil (see edit history)
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Good to see more than one truck on the tour; but sorry to hear that Larry's Buick truck threw a rod... 

 

The "silver lining" here is that Larry & Joyce will now be riding with friends in other old cars; which can be even more fun.

 

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Wow, What a great week. Thanks to our fearless leader Brian and his wife Chris for putting up with all the organizing the tour was a total success. I hear tell that Teddy Bear was the one that really show the way because he would just point his nose in the direction we needed to go and that is where we went. I had a seventeen year old young lady that road with me for three of the five days that we toured and she is hooked. I guess I'll have to start looking for a model T ford project as she wants to get her hands dirty learning about these early autos and also start touring. Thanks to all who made this possible. PHotos to come in the near future. Dandy Dave!

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       A few photos from a passengers perspective.

Brian's rear window set up worked reasonably well.  DSCF5209.JPG  Brian and Chris.  DSCF5208.JPG  

Larry Schramm's Coffee wagon  DSCF5216.JPG  Young vandals struck a "T" with TP. DSCF5240.JPG 

contemplating in the shade DSCF5241.JPG   Friday morning at Dandy Dave's dad's farm.DSCF5244.JPG

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Home safe and sound.

 

600+ miles with two trips up the grades to get to the Blue Ridge Parkway with 4 adults.  2 nd gear 18 mph for 6 miles each way.  Vacuum fuel pump and all.

 

The Buick ran well but needs valve work based on the stuck valve and the looks of it when we (Larry Schramm Dandy Dave and I) pulled it on the side of the road.  Dandy Dave gave it some PB Blaster and some twists and back in went the cage assembly and we toured the rest of the week.  Only down for an hour.  First trouble I have ever had on a tour.

 

So who has valve cages?  I have new valves and looks like it's time to use the valves but I need cages.

 

Great fun with Larry, Larry and Dave.  

 

Now we need to get Brother Schramm back on the road in time for Allentown.

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John, remember that there two different sizes of the cages for the intake and exhaust starting in 1918.  If the cages that you have are NOS, then that definitely would be a good thing.  If they are used, then that could present a problem.  I know a guy who could help you guys if the cages need rebuilt.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Right now, I'd say six exhaust cages as a minimum (That's an assumption since I've only been home a day and need to start pulling cages.) but I'm at interested in what all you or others have.

 

Please send me an email at the address below with what you have and prices.

 

The exhaust cages are different in diameter from the intake as Terry mentions.  Also there has to be some seat left on the cage to clean up and the stem bore needs to be reasonably tight and not egg shaped/loose.

 

Thank you!

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Brian:

 Tom Black is now BUICKLESS. He sold me the last of the Buick stuff he had. But his 1923-49 and the several spare engines are right down the road. I will check with the new owner since he is wanting now to sell it in order to make space for another project.

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A very rare picture of my 1923 with the hood up on the side of the roadIMG_0622.JPG.  Ha. Note the front seat out for tool access.

 

Dandy Dave, at the ready, with the vice grips, like a dentist on a mission.

 

Larry Schramm taking the pic so we can re-live this wonderful moment again and again.

 

For the record, and with their help, we were back on the road in an hour and toured the rest of the week with the hood down!

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Maybe Brian doesn't use MMO or other lubricant in his gas?  I'm told that modern gas with ethanol has less lube properties than real gas; so adding a shot of MMO or two cycle oil helps keep the valves from sticking.

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My stuck valve had everything to do with that valve never being serviced in over 20 years of touring and nothing to do with MMO. My fault.

 

My engine consumes enough (high quality) oil that the tops of my pistons are wet, always.  Just pull a plug and look in.  That's a quart of 20w50 per 150 miles.  The exhaust valves gets plenty of lube that way plus the high quality gear oil I drizzle on them all the time and use in the rocker shaft galley too.

 

This valve leaked at the seat due to an over due lapping/grinding.  The valve now in partial contact with the seat runs even hotter as it has less contact area to transfer heat and the failure snow balls as it 'burns' further.  Soon the valve is so hot it seizes.  My seized valve's face had 25% contact circumference.

 

Try MMO on pancakes is what I tell people who use it. Why, you might think I saw the analysis report on it the Materials Lab chemists performed at GM.  BTW don't do that.

 

If you are compelled to put something in your fuel use a name brand high quality 2 cycle oil product.

 

Note this and MMO or diesel fuel will lower your effective octane rating.  Not a big deal on 4.5 : 1 old low compression engines but a big deal on a high compression muscle car or new car.

 

Never put it in your crankcase unless you have a stuck lifter and think a short duration application like Rislone might unstick a hydraulic lifter.

 

Or save money and make your own MMO.  1 part cheap trasmission fluid, one part kerosene.

 

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Brian,

    I have to go with Rusty OToole on this one...  He posted this in the General forum:

 

Rusty_OToole

"Modern 2 strokes need very little oil but they must have some oil. 50:1 or 2% oil in the gas in some cases. What about a 4 stroke that is already lubricated? Maybe 1% or less, in critical areas would help. Old long stroke engines and engines in general before about 1980, suffered from wear in the upper cylinder and valve area more than anywhere else. There is little or no lubrication in this area. That is why the inverse oiler and gas additives were invented.

 

Maybe they help, and maybe they don't. But adding a little MMM to the gas can't do any harm.

 

I should also point out that in the 70s they blamed increased valve wear on lack of lubrication when they eliminated lead. Maybe a little oil that was made for the purpose would take its place."

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Using a quart of 20w50 oil every 150 miles with 10 mpg fuel economy = 1 quart of oil consumed for every 15 gallons of fuel burned, or 1 quart oil per 60 quarts fuel or 1/60 or 60:1 or 1.67%

 

So, I've got oil going past the exhaust valves. Plus there's the oil I drizzle on them from above too.   No need for more oil, 2 cycle, snake or pancake type.

 

The intake valves look great and they don't see any of that oil consumed so that sinks the idea you need oil in your fuel since I don't run oil in my fuel.  My drizzle from above is all they see.

 

Monday I pulled #1 Intake and Exhaust cages one at a time.  Lapping the exhaust made a significant improvement in compression.  Lapping the Intake had little effect.

 

Tuesday evening I worked 3 hours on removing #2 Exhaust cage.  No luck.  Even with Larry Schramm's Buffum Valve Puller which I'd rather not break, so I stopped short of really wrenching on it and soaked the little devil with more PB Blaster overnight.

 

Wednesday spent another hour on #2 Exhaust, left it to soak some more, got it to at least suck in some PB Blaster now down around the cage due to tapping on the cage stem, so victory will soon be mine.  Removed #5 and #6 Exhaust cages (in 5 minutes each, ha) and replaced with lapped ready-to-go spare cage assemblies since both were fried (it was #5 that hung up on the tour)  good compression now with both #5 and #6.  Pulled #3 Exhaust cage also in 5 minutes and lapped it in, good compression now there too.

 

Lashed all the valves that have been removed or are new at 0.012 cold.  Spec is 0.008 hot.

 

Cussed at #2 Exhaust some more and turned out the light. 

 

#4 has good compression so it is the last one to be lapped, if at all.

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