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Cajun Ty

Newbie looking for advice

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My first question is "What do the floorboards look like ?" if rusty then the rockers probably need replacement & run, do not walk.

If floor (and trunk) are good, then as Rusty said, the difference between $1500 and $500 is down in the noise compared to the total cost. BTW that AC is interesting but the air cleaner, add-on fader, and pedals look like a kid's toy.

Particularly for a first project, start with one that runs and drives & needs less.

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How old is your son? Consider his age, and how long a project might take. You might keep his interest longer and more involved if there is a quicker return on your investment of time like him dreaming or cruising down the road etc. Something he can see happening in a year or two would be better than something that may take five years. What a about a running project? Just my two cents as a father like yourself who has done projects with his kids.

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Thanks again guys on all the advice and knowledge, I came on here because my brother in law been offshore for his 30 day hitch and came in Saturday so yesterday at the every Sunday family lunch we talked about the car. When I told him what car I was looking at he looked at me in surprise and said I stopped and asked at least 10 times in the last 4 years and asked if he would sell it and the man always said not for sale. Now keep in mind he is a car freak and has owned and put together many old cars and old bikes (he is putting a 78 Trans Am together now). He said he knew the guys parents and it was their car from new they both past away a few years ago and the son drove the car till the water pump went out and it been parked since. This man is a Police officer and so was his dad and it definitely has a clean title. I'm going today and set up a time and date when he is off duty and buy the car. Hell the way I see it I paid more for my hunting bow so what the hell lol. Thanks again and will keep everyone updated on what happens.

Ty

Edited by Cajun Ty (see edit history)
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As always, it depends on what your resources are, what your situation is, and what your intentions are.  I paid about that for my car in worse condition.  It was 15 miles from my house, so the transportation was almost free.  It won't be worth a lot when it is done, but that wasn't a concern for me. 

 

but...  I have people (family), knowledge, and resources so almost all my labor is free.  I have time so I can wait for the best deals when I need stuff.  I have space to put things/parts/etc.

 

I have less than $11k in my car so far.  It's 99% done other than body work (free labor) and paint (not free by any means, but I know people) and some trim items.

 

My intention was to have a really nice, as original as reasonably possible, prewar car than I can enjoy, and I will have that for what will be, in the end, a very reasonable monetary expense, but priceless journey and experience.

 

Finally, when you are looking at a $1500 car that you will put thousands into, whether you pay $500 or $2500, that $1000 in the end won't really matter.  But yes, I definitely agree with the idea of starting with the best can you can.  It only makes sense to pay the least amount for the best starting point.  If you can find a car that would in the end have real value, that would be icing on the cake.  Funny though, parts for cars that are worth more also cost more and are harder to find.  That's why it always goes back to....it depends.

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Thanks again guys on all the advice and knowledge, I came on here because my brother in law been offshore for his 30 day hitch and came in Saturday so yesterday at the every Sunday family lunch we talked about the car. When I told him what car I was looking at he looked at me in surprise and said I stopped and asked at least 10 times in the last 4 years and asked if he would sell it and the man always said not for sale. Now keep in mind he is a car freak and has owned and put together many old cars and old bikes (he is putting a 78 Trans Am together now). He said he knew the guys parents and it was their car from new they both past away a few years ago and the son drove the car till the water pump went out and it been parked since. This man is a Police officer and so was his dad and it definitely has a clean title. I'm going today and set up a time and date when he is off duty and buy the car. Hell the way I see it I paid more for my hunting bow so what the hell lol. Thanks again and will keep everyone updated on what happens.

Ty

 

Right on. $1500 is nothing. Quibbling over a few bucks if it's the car you and your son want would be dumb. Good luck and have fun...........Bob

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I say go for it! The Dad-Son time is well worth it in my opinion. It doesn't look terribly rusted out. Lots of elbow grease and a few parts will make the car a driver and then maybe you can decide what direction you want to go. I did a '68 chev pick up with my stepson and it was the best thing for our relationship and he learned lots of useable skills. Things like this are what keeps our hobby alive

.

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There are no rules of commitment, even though the cartoon I found kidded about how long a project might take.

If it has the juices going in both of you it will be a good buy, even if you work on it for a while and unload it. If you work on the car with your son and he doesn't feel forced or manipulated into it you'll have a lot better time than each of you going your separate ways.

 

Through the 1950's my Dad bought a few older cars and resold them. One old timer in town still tells me about a 1950 Pontiac he bought from my Dad that was the best car he ever owned.

 

We didn't have an old car that we worked on together but he worked part time Saturday's at my Grandfather's car lot and tire shop. We got into a few jobs together that way and when we came home Saturday afternoon Mom always had a bucket of warm water and soap by the back porch for us to wash up with. He used to spread newspapers on my side of the car seat to sit on. He was an expert at not getting dirty. I told him I was learning how to get clean. It didn't tale long for me to start hanging out with friends and then it was about 10 years before our paths crossed again.

 

I'd say buy the car even if the outcome is learning what NOT to buy in the future. And how can you not love those coon ass '63 Ford tail lights.

 

Oh, I just saw a PBS documentary on West Virginia coal miners. They had a wash bucket by the porch too. I'm glad we got our carbon in the tire shop.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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"I paid about that for my car in worse condition."

 

"  I have people (family), knowledge, and resources so almost all my labor is free.  I have time so I can wait for the best deals when I need stuff.  I have space to put things/parts/etc."

 

"I have less than $11k in my car so far.  It's 99% done other than body work (free labor) and paint (not free by any means, but I know people) and some trim items."

 

Further comment unnecessary.

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I say go for it! The Dad-Son time is well worth it in my opinion. It doesn't look terribly rusted out. Lots of elbow grease and a few parts will make the car a driver and then maybe you can decide what direction you want to go. I did a '68 chev pick up with my stepson and it was the best thing for our relationship and he learned lots of useable skills. Things like this are what keeps our hobby alive

.

Thanks for the reply, I got in touch with the owner Monday and will be buying it

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There are no rules of commitment, even though the cartoon I found kidded about how long a project might take.

If it has the juices going in both of you it will be a good buy, even if you work on it for a while and unload it. If you work on the car with your son and he doesn't feel forced or manipulated into it you'll have a lot better time than each of you going your separate ways.

 

Through the 1950's my Dad bought a few older cars and resold them. One old timer in town still tells me about a 1950 Pontiac he bought from my Dad that was the best car he ever owned.

 

We didn't have an old car that we worked on together but he worked part time Saturday's at my Grandfather's car lot and tire shop. We got into a few jobs together that way and when we came home Saturday afternoon Mom always had a bucket of warm water and soap by the back porch for us to wash up with. He used to spread newspapers on my side of the car seat to sit on. He was an expert at not getting dirty. I told him I was learning how to get clean. It didn't tale long for me to start hanging out with friends and then it was about 10 years before our paths crossed again.

 

I'd say buy the car even if the outcome is learning what NOT to buy in the future. And how can you not love those coon ass '63 Ford tail lights.

 

Oh, I just saw a PBS documentary on West Virginia coal miners. They had a wash bucket by the porch too. I'm glad we got our carbon in the tire shop.

Bernie

Awesome story, yeah the tail lights are sexy lol

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"I paid about that for my car in worse condition."

 

"  I have people (family), knowledge, and resources so almost all my labor is free.  I have time so I can wait for the best deals when I need stuff.  I have space to put things/parts/etc."

 

"I have less than $11k in my car so far.  It's 99% done other than body work (free labor) and paint (not free by any means, but I know people) and some trim items."

 

Further comment unnecessary.

Thanks Rusty, I own a small sheet metal shop so the tin work isn't a problem and have plenty connections but still know it will have ups and downs doing this car not mentioning the years it will take but she will breath again

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CAJUN TY, - from Marty in Metairie, and a member of the Louisiana Region, and of the LAGNIAPPE (Houma) and the St. Bernard Chapters

 

First, congratulations and good luck with your project. Working with our kids is great bonding and great therapy

 

Welcome to the FORUM, 

 

WE have seven local Chapters of Louisiana Region of AACA.

Houma - Lagniappe

Evangeline - Lafayette

Contraband - Lake Charles

CENLA - Alexandria

Baton Rouge

St. Bernard

Slidell

 

We have many local activities throughout the year at each Chapter's option, as well as a State-wide event hosted by each Chapter every year.

We also have many members throughout the area who are pleased to share their expertise and experience, as well as to share some good Cajun food.

...and to get together to "PASS A GOOD TIME"

 

"Laissez Bon Temps Rouller"

 

Contact me anytime

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Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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I'm glad that you bought the car! The first thing I would do is get the engine to run and then replace the water pump. A running car is more fun to play with. If the cooling system holds pressure, you're home free. If not, and you discover that the block is cracked, just get another engine. A 289 should bolt right in if you can't find another 260. They're plentiful and relatively cheap. Good luck and keep us posted of your progress. It's a cool car! Larry W

Edited by Larry W (see edit history)
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It's nice to see someone that is really excited about their first old car project. 

 

.

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Great shape and needs negligible work. Additionally one that gets your extravagant. It is more amusing to chip away at and drive an auto you like.

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