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Cajun Ty

Newbie looking for advice

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Hello everyone, me and my son want to do a project car and went look at a 1962 Ford Galaxie sedan that been sitting in a mans yard for years and I been wanting to go ask him about it but never really had the time to do so. So me and my son was passing by the other day and he saw it and asked to stop and look at it and he fell in love with the style of the car so we went ask if it's for sale and he said he would but wants $1500.00 firm. It has a 289 with manual transmission which was running before water pump went out and I did turn the fan to see if it was frozen and it wasn't. Like I said it will be a project car and know it will take years to do but want to do it together. My question is by the pics is it worth paying $1500?

Thanks for any advice

Ty

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Welcome to the AACA forum! The car looks a little grungy, but straight and solid from what we can see. I would think that $1,500 is about right. When you did "turn the fan", did the crankshaft turn also? I would also think that given the car is a three on the tree with a 289 V8 2-door sedan that it would be a very sought after car.

Let me add that I am jealous that you picked a great way to do your son a favor by choosing to restore a car together!

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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Welcome to the AACA forum! The car looks a little grungy, but straight and solid from what we can see. I would think that $1,500 is about right. When you did "turn the fan", did the crankshaft turn also? I would also think that given the car is a three on the tree with a 289 V8 2-door sedan that it would be a very sought after car.

Thanks for the reply, yes the crank did turn and the doors work flawlessly and no cracks on any of the windows

Edited by Cajun Ty (see edit history)

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Way too bad of a car and way too much money. You can do a lot better.

 

You should always buy the best car you can afford. It will save you a lot of money and time. There is no way you can put an old Klunker into top shape, for what you pay for a good car in the first place.

 

Don't overmatch yourself especially on your first bout. Look for a car in good shape, and in running condition. Watch your local ads, I guarantee within a month you will find more good deals than you know what to do with.

 

Start by buying an Old Car Value Guide. Get them at any good book store or magazine store. Sorry Walmart is not a good book store.

 

 

Look for a car that is in overall good shape and needs minimal work. Also one that catches your fancy. It is more fun to work on and drive a car you like.

 

Good luck and good hunting.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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What Rusty wrote is absolutely the best advice you can get when it comes to the old car hobby, and it is the smart way to proceed in this hobby.  However (there's always a however), there are many of us in the hobby who think with out hearts and not our brains. :o   Old cars tend to follow us home ... with the assistance of a tow truck of course. ;)   If you're relatively young and have a really good feel for machinery, like to bust your knuckles and spend more money than a project is worth, then an old non- runner is for you.

 

Although I'm mostly a Chevy fan, I'm a sucker for any vintage iron with a V-8 and manual transmission.  With that said, the car you're looking at has apparently been sitting in a field for a number of years, exposed to all of the elements.  This makes the floors, rocker panels and lower fender wells suspect.  To repair significant body deterioration can involve either much time/labor, much money, and, all too often both.  Interior refurbishment can also be quite expensive.  If there are any AACA Chapters nearby, it would help you "a whole bunch" to contact them and seek the opinion of a knowledgeable individual who could actually look at the car.

 

Good luck,

Grog

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What Rusty wrote is absolutely the best advice you can get when it comes to the old car hobby, and it is the smart way to proceed in this hobby.  However (there's always a however), there are many of us in the hobby who think with out hearts and not our brains. :o   Old cars tend to follow us home ... with the assistance of a tow truck of course. ;)   If you're relatively young and have a really good feel for machinery, like to bust your knuckles and spend more money than a project is worth, then an old non- runner is for you.

 

Although I'm mostly a Chevy fan, I'm a sucker for any vintage iron with a V-8 and manual transmission.  With that said, the car you're looking at has apparently been sitting in a field for a number of years, exposed to all of the elements.  This makes the floors, rocker panels and lower fender wells suspect.  To repair significant body deterioration can involve either much time/labor, much money, and, all too often both.  Interior refurbishment can also be quite expensive.  If there are any AACA Chapters nearby, it would help you "a whole bunch" to contact them and seek the opinion of a knowledgeable individual who could actually look at the car.

 

Good luck,

Grog

Thanks

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Let me tell you what happened with my first car, a red '62 ChevySS Convertble, bought under a similar circumstance. The car had a leaking water pump and after replacement, the car ran fine....for a little while. Long story short, the previous owner kept a jug of water in the car, and when the "hot light" came on, she would pull over and replenish the cooling system. When I owned the car, I would always get an odd coolant odor whenever the motor reached operating temperature, especially if the heater was turned on. One morning after the car sat all night, I removed the oil pan drain plug, to change the oil, and about one quart of water drained out before oil started to drain. I wrongly assumed that a head gasket was leaking so I changed those. Removed the oil pan drain plug again and the same scenario happened. That's when my dad suggested that maybe the block is cranked internally. Then it hit me like a ton of bricks, the leaking pump, the jug of water, the "hot light", it all made sense. She added ice cold water to an overheated engine and cracked the block. Keep my story in mind when discussing the price of that Ford, if you still want to buy it.

If the car ran and held normal coolant temperature and PRESSURE, It may be worth the asking price. As it now sits, maybe a few hundred dollars, or a little over scrap price, to take the risk. I wouldn't go overboard with a full blown restoration, just a blanket or cheap set of seat covers, clean it up and drive it. Your son will have lifetime memories. Good luck! Larry W

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That car is actually a 63 model and the engine should be a 260 I believe. It's not a bad looking car but a hardtop is more desirable,the sedan being even harder to recover your investment. I think you should look for the next one.

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In my opinion it is very overpriced. The reason it has been there for years is because many others thought it was too many dollars. Now that you have decided to project together you will find many candidates. Whenever you find one post some pictures. Wayne

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That car is actually a 63 model and the engine should be a 260 I believe. It's not a bad looking car but a hardtop is more desirable,the sedan being even harder to recover your investment. I think you should look for the next one.

I read the door plate wrong lol you're right

Thanks for the reply

Edited by Cajun Ty (see edit history)

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Let me tell you what happened with my first car, a red '62 ChevySS Convertble, bought under a similar circumstance. The car had a leaking water pump and after replacement, the car ran fine....for a little while. Long story short, the previous owner kept a jug of water in the car, and when the "hot light" came on, she would pull over and replenish the cooling system. When I owned the car, I would always get an odd coolant odor whenever the motor reached operating temperature, especially if the heater was turned on. One morning after the car sat all night, I removed the oil pan drain plug, to change the oil, and about one quart of water drained out before oil started to drain. I wrongly assumed that a head gasket was leaking so I changed those. Removed the oil pan drain plug again and the same scenario happened. That's when my dad suggested that maybe the block is cranked internally. Then it hit me like a ton of bricks, the leaking pump, the jug of water, the "hot light", it all made sense. She added ice cold water to an overheated engine and cracked the block. Keep my story in mind when discussing the price of that Ford, if you still want to buy it.

If the car ran and held normal coolant temperature and PRESSURE, It may be worth the asking price. As it now sits, maybe a few hundred dollars, or a little over scrap price, to take the risk. I wouldn't go overboard with a full blown restoration, just a blanket or cheap set of seat covers, clean it up and drive it. Your son will have lifetime memories. Good luck! Larry W

Thanks for the reply and story

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A 63 Galaxie Club Sedan- one of my favorite Fords! B)

 

if it weren't missing so much of the trim and the door panels I'd say go for it since the engine turns free, but I think you can find another one (or a 61,62 or 64) in better shape for not a lot more money as the 2-door sedan bodystyle is not as hot as hardtops or converts. What you'll run into are the guys who want this bodystyle for a 427/4-speed clone build, which may be why the guy wants as much as he does.

 

It's definitely a 1963 Ford. 62B on the door tag and body plate indicates bodystyle (62= 2-door sedan) and series (B= base Galaxie trim level). Here's a good resource http://www.tpocr.com/fordbp3.html

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Sorry I forgot to add I own a small sheet metal business and know some body work having redone my first truck in high school will search for a pic was a 79 Chevy stepside. The car we want to do will be custom not restored to original and both know it will take many years and money but it will be worth the time with my son on whichever we decide. I will offer something to him and if it works great if not then we will keep searching. Thanks again for all the advice, you guys rock

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A 63 Galaxie Club Sedan- one of my favorite Fords! B)

 

if it weren't missing so much of the trim and the door panels I'd say go for it since the engine turns free, but I think you can find another one (or a 61,62 or 64) in better shape for not a lot more money as the 2-door sedan bodystyle is not as hot as hardtops or converts. What you'll run into are the guys who want this bodystyle for a 427/4-speed clone build, which may be why the guy wants as much as he does.

 

It's definitely a 1963 Ford. 62B on the door tag and body plate indicates bodystyle (62= 2-door sedan) and series (B= base Galaxie trim level). Here's a good resource http://www.tpocr.com/fordbp3.html

Thanks alot for the info I read the tag wrong lol couldn't make out the words on top of plate and looking at the numbers I wrote down y'all are correct it's a 63

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Cajun these responses remind me of when I first went into business and thought about getting a Small Business Administration loan. For advice I called my local SCORE (Service Core of Retired Executives) for advice. Turned out the fellow I talked with had known my Dad so he said he would give me his very best advice. His advice? Hang up the phone and never call this office again and never ask the government for anything. He was right. All the advice you get here, while valuable, will be negative. If you like the car, have a passion for working on cars or think you have then go for it. If I had listened to the same advice as a young man I would never have bought that ratty old '32 Packard (bad shape, too much work, over priced) abd certainly not that '55 Jaguar (Lucas electrics, prone to rust). Listen to all the advice you hear then make up your own mind. These guys will convince you that unless that field car is a Duesenberg or Bugatti it isn't worth fooling with. It all depends on how you measure worth.

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Most importantly, join a local AACA Region and have fun with whatever car you eventually buy.

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Unless it is something ridiculously rare never, ever buy a field car.  Those quarters look terrifying even with the low res pictures.

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Cajun these responses remind me of when I first went into business and thought about getting a Small Business Administration loan. For advice I called my local SCORE (Service Core of Retired Executives) for advice. Turned out the fellow I talked with had known my Dad so he said he would give me his very best advice. His advice? Hang up the phone and never call this office again and never ask the government for anything. He was right. All the advice you get here, while valuable, will be negative. If you like the car, have a passion for working on cars or think you have then go for it. If I had listened to the same advice as a young man I would never have bought that ratty old '32 Packard (bad shape, too much work, over priced) abd certainly not that '55 Jaguar (Lucas electrics, prone to rust). Listen to all the advice you hear then make up your own mind. These guys will convince you that unless that field car is a Duesenberg or Bugatti it isn't worth fooling with. It all depends on how you measure worth.

Thanks for the reply, just hate to see a car rot and it really wasn't for sale never had a sign or anything just stopped and asked about it. The thing I like about it is nobody ever did any body work and it's the original paint and everything is original on it like i said I'll counter offer and see how it goes. Not many of these around here that's why it catches my eye and for my 15 yr old son to say he loves the style makes me proud he loves classic cars

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Cajun, doing a car project is a great thing to do with your son. I would be more concerned with body issues rather than mechanical. The mechanicals you and your son can do, or learn to do. If the floors, quarter panels and trunk floor are gone that might require serious money to replace and might not be in the area of your expertise. If you really want this specific car why not talk to the present owner and tell him about your plans, he might work with you on the price. Also, make sure he has all the paper work that goes with the car, title, registration etc. Keep in touch!

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Even at twice the price, it will only be a small fraction of how much money you'll have in it by the time you're done. So, if you're concerned about spending $1,500, I would let it go.

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Unless it is something ridiculously rare never, ever buy a field car.  Those quarters look terrifying even with the low res pictures.

Wise, wise advice! Wayne

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The 289 V-8 was very common in Galaxie Fords after about May of '63. After I bought my '63 Galaxie XL I stopped at a

dealership in Georgia and every full size new Ford on the lot had a 289 in it. I remember being surprised that they could sell full size cars with such a small V-8 when all my friends were getting 390 and 427 V-8's in their new Fords.

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Even at twice the price, it will only be a small fraction of how much money you'll have in it by the time you're done. So, if you're concerned about spending $1,500, I would let it go.

Thanks for reply, I don't have concerns of spending $1,500 I just wanted opinions from more knowledgeable folks

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If it had no rust issues and can be confirmed to be free of poor accident repairs (which can only be done by a very thorough visual inspection with flashlight, mirror and maybe a magnet), I might think about purchasing.  As mentioned above, the mechanical stuff is relatively easy (assuming it was never exposed to road salt) but any major rust repair will be very time consuming to do correctly or expensive to farm out.  I also agree that you can probably find something better for the money in a similar vintage.

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The 289 V-8 was very common in Galaxie Fords after about May of '63. After I bought my '63 Galaxie XL I stopped at a

dealership in Georgia and every full size new Ford on the lot had a 289 in it. I remember being surprised that they could sell full size cars with such a small V-8 when all my friends were getting 390 and 427 V-8's in their new Fords.

I know the first Mustangs(64 1/2) and Falcon/Comets up to 64 were 260s. They are hard to find for those restoring these models.

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