Ken_P

Cross Trailers

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George.....no spare on........just off with the flat. I get to a safe location and then replace the flat tire. With the triple axel I can safely run with two tires and not be overloaded on the tires. So, with a flat, all I do is jump out with the impact gun and remove eight lugs, pull the wheel off, and toss it in the rear. All very fast and easy. Talk to you soon......Ed

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I too  will vote with the others for the electric impact wrench and ramps. 

 

I bought a DeWalt 1/2" impact and I keep some 2x8's, 4x4's, and other wood in the back of my truck so if I have a flat, just drive the good tire up a ramp and zip the flat tire off and the new one on. I use wood because you never know the type of shoulder you might need to drive on.  Changing the tire usually takes about than 5 minutes with this set up. 

 

I look at the purchase of the impact wrench as a large safety issue to get off the side of the road as quickly as possible and on the way.  I keep the wrench in the back of my truck also along with a spare battery and a set of impact sockets.

 

Also I too always carry two spares.  I have had a flat out on I-80 out west with nothing for miles and it is comforting to know that you still have a spare if something happens.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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great read on June Day with no show going until maybe July 23

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Posted (edited)

I have, for more than fifteen years, carried a ramp. Mine is relatively lightweight, but heavy duty plastic. It was bought at an RV Trailer Specialty shop, and has a curved area where the "good" tire rests. It also has an additional thickness with a solid rubber block in the curved area for extra height.

 

Now the good part -

This year my daughter and son got together and bought me  a DeWALT DCF899P1  IMPACT WRENCH kit.The 1/2 " drive unit delivers 100/300/700 ft-lbs and has three variable speed settings, working at 0-400/1200/1900 rpm. The kit also included a 20 Volt, 5 Amp battery and charger, as well a a zipper storage bag. 

 

As if that weren't enough, other items not part of the DeWALT kit are a set of Torque Sticks (So I don't SNAP-OFF the lugs?) and sets of metric and SAE Impact sockets.

 

Hope I never need to use the stuff, but history tells me that as long as I trailer cars cross country, or have the chance to help someone else, the gifts will come in handy, and will get us off the side of the road much more quickly.

 

Hope this year is a good Fathers Day for all !

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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On 2/11/2016 at 11:31 PM, Marty Roth said:

additional thought - our trailer has an extra 4-1/2 ft enclosed with a taPERED AND WEDGED FRONT WHICH GIVES EXTRA STORAGE FOR (sorry) tools, parts, and extra tires, and aalso reduces wind resistance. 

 

Higher floor means that wheel boxes are only 5" high, so '54 Caddy doors open over the box and into the driver-side access door.

 

Many extra tie-down points and many extra lights in ceiling, sidewalls, and under axles - no more holding flashlight in teeth

Absolutely higher floors to lower the wheel wells.  When I had my 71 Riviera it only was 9" off the floor.  A guy gave me some 2x8' boards from a damaged pier.  They work good, but ad a whole lot of weight to the trailer.  I bassically with 24 feet, but it makes it a lot harder to get gas at many of the newer gas stations that have pumps vertical to a little store.

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