Ken_P

Cross Trailers

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Any experience with Cross Trailers in Elkhart, IN? After much shopping around, they seem to be the best combo of features, quality, and price. I am buying a 22' trailer with a 2' V, 10K GVW. Escape door, EZ track, and torsion axles. I know aluminum is better, but I don't want to blow my budget, and will have a covered storage location for much of the trailers life. I have a diesel 3/4 PU, so towing capacity is not a concern. Towing a 1937 Packard 120 1092 for now, who knows what in the future! Thanks!

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Ken,

Were it me, I would go for the 24' version.

Who knows what you will tow in the future, and a trailer is a big investment.

You would not want to "do it over" in the future.post-112969-0-17997700-1455037629_thumb.post-112969-0-68771500-1455037761_thumb.

I added my own escape door.

Mike in Colorado

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Mike,

Is that just painted OSB on the inside of your trailer?  It looks pretty nice in the photos.

 

Ken,

No experience with Cross Trailers but things to look for:

16 OC vs 24 OC (on center) for floor, sides and ceiling support

Decent wiring connectors  (especially underneath) - not the silly snap over ones

Load D or E rated tires

Brakes on both axles

Crawl underneath and look at the quality of the frame welds

Undercoating (or have it undercoated after you buy it)

Stainless vs zinc coated hardware and door latches

LED lighting - much less power consumption

Interior lighting

Bonded exterior aluminum side panels vs steel and vs screwed

Decent front dolly jack

Some type of warranty

 

 

Scott

Edited by Stude Light (see edit history)
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I agree with 24, when you sell it it will go much easier. I would never buy a trailer with 15 inch wheels. Get the 16's as they are much safer and wear better. Will give you some extra capacity and much bigger brakes.

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I also agree with 24 ft.  That is what I purchased after a lot of investigation.

 

Sounds like you are getting 5200 pound axles which is a great choice. Probably has brakes on both axles but ask just to be sure.

 

I also have lighting for both 110 and 12 volt on the ceiling.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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I agree with what Ed and Larry said. Mine is an all aluminum 24 ft with a pair of 6,000 lb axles.

I also had it built with a foot of extra height, so hauling a Brass-Era car with the top up is no problem, and I don't have to lower the top while standing in the rain - just drive in.

 

Get the best you can afford - and let it double as a garage.

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)

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additional thought - our trailer has an extra 4-1/2 ft enclosed with a taPERED AND WEDGED FRONT WHICH GIVES EXTRA STORAGE FOR (sorry) tools, parts, and extra tires, and aalso reduces wind resistance. 

 

Higher floor means that wheel boxes are only 5" high, so '54 Caddy doors open over the box and into the driver-side access door.

 

Many extra tie-down points and many extra lights in ceiling, sidewalls, and under axles - no more holding flashlight in teeth

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Scott,

My floor is 5/8" treated plywood, that I painted with latex deck paint, with sand mixed in, and stirred WELL. The side walls are 3/8" plywood, painted gloss white. I ripped a 2x4 and added the red guide rails. Winch is from HARBOR FRT (5k) for an ATV with a remote on a 12' cord.

Mine was made by Arizing Ind. In GA.  It has a full perimeter frame and 16" tires. My only regret is that the sides are 24 gage. Should have gone with the thicker side sheets.

 

As opposed to Marty's "raised" trailer, which by the way still needs a wax job, my wheel wells stand 16" tall inside, so I fabricated my own 76" square escape door just ahead of the wheel wells. Not a big deal.

 

This last fall, I installed a set of 2" taller equalizers and greasable shackle bolts which raised the tail end of the trailer about 3". Now she does not drag so much on gas station driveways.

 

Mike in Colorado

Edited by FLYER15015 (see edit history)

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Mike, if we ever get to spend any time at home instead of supporting club events (in Philly now at AACA Annual Meeting and Board Meeting), you are welcome to visit, and to sanitize the trailer - and to enjoy some real Cajun hospitality...

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Marty,

Funny you should mention.

We are headed to Fla. early in March to visit my bride's sister in Claremont.

We will pick up the Jayco and head back to Colorado via I-10 to Houston around the 22nd-25th.

Could very well stop by and say hi, subject to your schedule.

I know several places they sell car wax.

Boy, now we are really off topic............sorry Lamar, you are on the "visit list" on our way down....

Mike in Colorado

Edited by FLYER15015 (see edit history)

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Mike,

 

The AACA Winter Southeastern Meet will be in Naples, Florida - March 16 - 19, 2016.

 

Will be driving the '65 Corvair Monza convertible, so won't have the trailer in Florida-

 

We'll be there judging the Saturday Meet, 

and during the Friday Member Roundtable, probably visiting a Florida cousin for a few dfays afterward, but please stay in touch. 

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I also am a big fan of 24 foot trailers for cars especially for storage of stuff.  I have an ATC 24 aluminum 5200 axles.  Since you already have a 3/4 ton diesel tow rig you are good to go but be careful of too big of axles on steel trailers as you can wind up in commercial DOT territory with a high GCVW. As mentioned low level lighting is a must as well as a planned location for the side door so you can walk out of it!

Robert

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I transport every day.

I have owned (4) enclosed trailers.

(3) have been made by Arising Industries in Fitzgerald, GA.

All of them were bought from Tim Woods at Colony Cargo Trailers - also in Fitzgerald, GA.

 

What I have learned:

 

Install an electric winch - winch your vehicle on & off - no need for an escape door.

If possible - order straight - not drop - axles ....

This will increase trailer deck height & clearance so you do not bottom out.

Spring axles can be serviced - springs can be replaced.

Torsion axles are non repairable & must be relaced when they fail.

Get a rear door w/ minimum 78 inch clearance.

I opt for barn doors over ramp doors - wider rear opening - more versatility.

Extended tongue will allow for tighter turns without damaging trailer or tow vehicle.

 

My enclosed car hauler trailers have side barn doors as well.

 

My current custom one is my largest - 34 feet enclosed w/ 8 ft. rear door clearance.

Currently it is at the manufacturer for repairs after I was rear ended by a hit & run driver.

 

So - I am presently using a 24 ft. car hauler I had to buy stock off Tim's lot.

 

 

 

Jim 

 

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Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)

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Guys - thanks for all the input, even though it's been a while! Thought I would post some updates. I ended up with a 24' cross trailer. No V. I added two strips of EZ track on the entire floor, a spare tire (of course), 5200 lb torsion axles, brakes on both, and an escape door on the drivers side. Not as fancy as some of the nicer trailers, but it has LED lighting inside and out, and I've had great luck with it.

So far I've probably got close to 10K on the trailer, including several long trips with my car (37 Packard 120 touring sedan), workbench, motorcycle, and most of my tools. Using it like that while moving I've had it right up at the 10k GVWR with no issues. Truck pulls it really well, and it pulls smoother than my 5th wheel RV, even without an equalizing hitch! Couldn't be happier. My next trailer will be aluminum, just for the weight savings, and maybe a little taller, as my interest in cars veers towards older cars, but overall very happy with Cross. 

I did factory pickup (cheaper than freight) and was very impressed with the build facility and their customer service. I got a flat about two miles out of the factory, and since it was caused by a screw from their factory floor, they had no problems replacing the tire. Overall great experience so far.

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Ken, congrats on the trailer,

 

Always carry AT LEAST 2 Spare Tires, 

No need to waste a day hunting for a replacement at the first sign of a flat or a separation, especially in the middle of nowhere.

i carry either 3 or 4 spares, and at least one unmounted, but I run 235/85R-16 LRE on 6K axles

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Marty Roth said:

Always carry AT LEAST 2 Spare Tires, 

In support of Marty's recommendation, I have first hand knowledge (although it didn't happen to me--YET) of two instances in which a blowout on one tire took out the adjoining tire as well.  In one of those cases, the dually tow vehicle and the expensive aluminum trailer wound up on their sides in the median and were totaled; the $400K car in the trailer was hanging like a bat from its straps and had its left side fenders caved but repairable.

 

I use a non-contact thermometer to check each tread, sidewall, and hub temp at every pitstop.

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8 minutes ago, Grimy said:

In support of Marty's recommendation, I have first hand knowledge (although it didn't happen to me--YET) of two instances in which a blowout on one tire took out the adjoining tire as well.  In one of those cases, the dually tow vehicle and the expensive aluminum trailer wound up on their sides in the median and were totaled; the $400K car in the trailer was hanging like a bat from its straps and had its left side fenders caved but repairable.

 

I use a non-contact thermometer to check each tread, sidewall, and hub temp at every pitstop.

 

Thanks Grimy, and I always use a torque wrench to check lug nuts every morning when towing, and check tire pressure at the same time. 

One cannot be too careful - equipment, cargo, family, 

 

by by the way, Contrary to some opinions per trailer-specific tires, i only use Michelin LT Light Truck tires on my trailer 

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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On 2/11/2016 at 11:31 PM, Marty Roth said:

additional thought - our trailer has an extra 4-1/2 ft enclosed with a taPERED AND WEDGED FRONT WHICH GIVES EXTRA STORAGE FOR (sorry) tools, parts, and extra tires, and aalso reduces wind resistance. 

 

Higher floor means that wheel boxes are only 5" high, so '54 Caddy doors open over the box and into the driver-side access door.

 

Many extra tie-down points and many extra lights in ceiling, sidewalls, and under axles - no more holding flashlight in teeth

Marty, What brand is your trailer?  I was unable to find a trailer maker who would raise the floor.  Currently I don't plan to buy another trailer, although my 20-year old Haulmark is totally shot.  This is because I'm 80 and do not plan to tow but one more time....to the Sentimental Tour in WVA in 2020.  That said, the Glidden Tour this year in SC does beckon.  I was going to sell the trailer and Suburban tow vehicle in January, but the 2020 tour changed my mind.

 

I recommend not getting a rooftop air-vent.  Mine has leaked numerous times.  It is leaking now and I'm trying to get all health concerns out of the way and find a bodyshop who while cover it with metal and seal it.  It is a 24-foot trailer and I've found the extra 2 feet extremely useful inside, but that also makes getting gas more difficult.  When I first got the trailer I swung out of a gas stop and the tail end of the trailer swung around and hit the car at the pump on the other side of me.  I wished a few times that it was 22-feet.  Also highly recommend 6,000 pound axles.  I had to put new axles under my trailer to cut down on blowouts.....and the car I most often hauled only weighed 3600 pounds plus gas.  To raise the floor I put in side-by-side 2x12's three high for each side wheels.  That really increased the weight of the trailer.

 

I've thought about getting an aluminum open trailer with a solid floor and hydraulic lift, but I don't like the car out in the open towing down the road.

 

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Earl,

 

My trailer was custom built in 2006 by Forest River in Elkhart, Indiana -

all aluminum 24ft box plus a wedge and taper adding another 4-1/2 ft of cargo space, and the tongue makes it just over 30 ft.

Since it is raised, the wheel boxes are only 4-1/2 inches high so the '54 Caddy door opens over thewheelbox and over the driver-side escape door.

pair of 6,000lb Dexter Torsion axles 

2 roof vents which have never leaked,

12 tie-down reinforced locations,

4 lights in the ceiling,

4 lights in the side walls at wheel-level,

LED strip lights in the floor where I would tie down my cars 

Electric tongue jack and winch run of the interior battery,

and it recharges from the standard hookup.

Tires are 235/85R-16E Michelin Light Truck tires on aluminum rims,

and I always carry 4 spares so I can help out the next guy who has more than one tire go bad

 

I carry a lightweight plastic ramp to raise a good tire so that the other tire on the same side can be changed (or the brakes adjusted) without jacking the rig.

 

 

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"I carry a lightweight plastic ramp to raise a good tire so that the other tire on the same side can be changed (or the brakes adjusted) without jacking the rig."

Marty...I also carry a plastic ramp (bright yellow color) that's good for something like 15k pounds and works wonderfully.  I had a passenger side flat tire driving by myself while returning from Hershey (via Long Beach, CA) and it was evening traffic in downtown Oakland and I was jammed up against the side rail.  I had the trailer up and ready to change literally within minutes.  The Freeway Ranger (paid to help with troubled cars on the freeway) happened to stop within 5 minutes.  He said he wasn't allowed to lift a loaded trailer.....but since everything was all done, he took out his power impact wrench and another 5 minutes I was on my way.  This was the second time I'd used these ramps.  I've just purchased one for my good friend in Australia.  The manufacturer now has a new item, a wall mounted sleeve to store the ramp on your inside trailer wall.

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I carry the jack ramp, along with a bunch of other stuff. I took the hit and bought a cordless Snap On electric impact and carry it when on the road. I also carry a four ton floor jack in a custom made box, a 25 ton bottle jack, and three spares. Overkill but worth it when hauling very heavy cars. After too many issues over thirty years, I have learned to carry every imaginable spare..........brake away battery, bulbs and lens covers, triangles, ect,ect,ect. Nothing like being 100 percent prepared for a trailer issue.......cuts down stress when you know you have most everything you need. I carry an entire backing plate assembly with extra spindle, drum,lug nuts......bearings and seals.......yup.......I over do it......but have never regretted it. With the new tractor trailer type 16 inch tires I don't even think about flats anymore.........the last 80K have been the best I have ever hauled. Today doubble tire failure is common when the front tire lets go putting trash into and on the rear tire. Seems every time I have some issue it in the worst possible place........with the three axel trailer I can pop a tire off without jacking using the electric impact, and get going again in less than a minute. Preparation is the key.

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

with the three axel trailer I can pop a tire off without jacking using the electric impact, and get going again in less than a minute.

I'll bring the stopwatch, Ed, and you bring the jug of Maker's Mark you'll give me when you exceed one minute...  :-)

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George.....I keep the gloves, safety vest, and impact gun in the cab of the truck. Getting the tire off in the minute isn't the hard part.......It's getting it in the back of the pick up bed without hurting yourself on the tire thats all ripped up that is the worst part. I have almost been sent to my maker twice on the side of the road about fifteen years ago. I now will no longer change a flat on a modern car or antique car on the side of the road myself anymore, its just not safe. With a valuable car in the trailer, I am not comfortable leaving it on the side of the road for any amount of time with the way people crash into stuff in the breakdown land today. With my all steel casement tractor trailer tires, I think flats on the trailer are a thing of the past for me. Now I just need to deal with the truck tires. My last set of new Michelins went 35k and they now need replacement, they seemed to cost three times more than the coopers I ran for so many years, but only last twice as long. I will reinvest in the Michelins next week when I get back down south. Got to have you pick up the brake tool box this week.....Ill give you a buzz. Ed

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

eorge.....I keep the gloves, safety vest, and impact gun in the cab of the truck. Getting the tire off in the minute isn't the hard part.......It's getting it in the back of the pick up bed without hurting yourself on the tire thats all ripped up that is the worst part. I have almost been sent to my maker twice on the side of the road about fifteen years ago. I now will no longer change a flat on a modern car or antique car on the side of the road myself anymore, its just not safe. With a valuable car in the trailer, I am not comfortable leaving it on the side of the road for any amount of time with the way people crash into stuff in the breakdown land today. With my all steel casement tractor trailer tires, I think flats on the trailer are a thing of the past for me. Now I just need to deal with the truck tires. My last set of new Michelins went 35k and they now need replacement, they seemed to cost three times more than the coopers I ran for so many years, but only last twice as long. I will reinvest in the Michelins next week when I get back down south. Got to have you pick up the brake tool box this week.....Ill give you a buzz. Ed

Ed, I've been meaning to check in with you on the brake tools to be picked up, look forward to your call.  For your planning on that issue, I'll be picking eqpt up in open-bed pickup and we'll have rain here thru Thursday.

 

I do the same as you equipment-wise, plus gloves are heavy leather for safe handling of broken steel belts, but my comment questioned how you could get the spare on, flat into truck and be on your way in less than one minute flat!  I STILL want to see you do that!

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