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suggestions of which one


cheezestaak2000
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i'm soon to come into some money, so i thought a classic car might be a good way to have some fun, and actually make a decent investment. as a buick dealership mechanic in the late 60's , i've always admired a couple of cars.

my list is down to two, first gen. riviera, or 66 thru 68 wildcat. the riv seems like an obvious choice, but as i look, the wildcat seems a lot harder to find any suggestions as to which might appreciate in value more? i plan to use the car as an occasional driver. i'd also like to know the vin code letter for the GM wilmington assembly plant. thanks in advance.

Edited by cheezestaak2000 (see edit history)
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Guest AlCapone

Good to hear money came your way ! My personal opinion is that I believe old cars are not a very good investment. Should you buy them to have fun, definitely yes! Should you buy them to make money, definitely no! JMO, Wayne

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As a fellow Buick enthusiast and GM tech, I'd say you probably can't go wrong with either one. But you're correct, the Riv seems to have garnered a lasting group of followers and really carved out its place in American automotive history. There are still lots of Riv's available, clubs, parts, information, availability, etc. Makes it seem like the more logical choice.

But if I came across a great Wildcat I wouldn't pass it up!  :lol: 

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Guest bkazmer

there's more support for the Riv, but I also like the Wildcat, which can be a convt of course.  The 66 uses a different engine from the 67-8.  There are two trim levels - I much prefer the Wildcat Custom with an interior heavy on stainless trim and more differentiated from the LeSabre's

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As others have pointed out, cars can be fun;

but don't treat them as an investment.

Invest wisely most of your money;  and if you

want, allot a smaller percentage of it for the

enjoyment of an old car.

 

Yes, the 1963-65 Rivieras are popular, and quite

common and easy to find.  The 1966-68 Wildcats

are indeed less common, and unless you get a

convertible, they are less expensive too.

Be patient, I recommend:  Waiting to find the right one

will make you happier in the long run, instead of

a quick purchase for instant gratification.

 

 And while you're enjoying the search for the right car,

you'll broaden your knowledge.

You might find a model that you never thought of! 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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No one, no matter how much of an expert he appears,

really knows what future classic-car prices will be.

People can see how cars have done in the PAST,

and try to extrapolate that into the future.

So get what you like and enjoy it, and don't think about its future value.

Maybe the future will reward you;  maybe it won't. 

But the fun, and the enjoyment of meeting others in 

the hobby, will definitely reward you!

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i'm soon to come into some money, so i thought a classic car might be a good way to have some fun, and actually make a decent investment. as a buick dealership mechanic in the late 60's , i've always admired a couple of cars.

my list is down to two, first gen. riviera, or 66 thru 68 wildcat. the riv seems like an obvious choice, but as i look, the wildcat seems a lot harder to find any suggestions as to which might appreciate in value more? i plan to use the car as an occasional driver. i'd also like to know the vin code letter for the GM wilmington assembly plant. thanks in advance.

The Riviera has and will out value a Wildcat. The years of Wildcat you want are also some fine looking cars.

I think I would hold off on a car purchase for at least two years to see where this economy is going. Signs say it's might be rough. I just hope not too rough.

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a) I cannot think properly without at least one convertible.

B) Since I have one my choice would be the 65 Riviera GS

- final year of first gen was styled most like the show car with hidden headlamps

- GS had dual quads, always impressive when you open the hood. Will also bring a premium

- 65 was the first year of the Turbo-Hydramatic 400. If do not understand why better than the Dynaflow, ask.

- Riv is most likely to have AC

 

OTOH the 66 Wildcat Grand Sport could be had with an optional dual quad engine and manual trans. Might be a tad difficult to find one though.

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a) I cannot think properly without at least one convertible.

B) Since I have one my choice would be the 65 Riviera GS

- final year of first gen was styled most like the show car with hidden headlamps

- GS had dual quads, always impressive when you open the hood. Will also bring a premium

- 65 was the first year of the Turbo-Hydramatic 400. If do not understand why better than the Dynaflow, ask.

- Riv is most likely to have AC

 

OTOH the 66 Wildcat Grand Sport could be had with an optional dual quad engine and manual trans. Might be a tad difficult to find one though.

the 4 speed manuel in the wildcat gs was extremly rare. funny story: since the shift knob on the 4 speed was the same as the floor mounted automatic. a guy at the wilmington plant got in one to move it. the 1965 had no clutch safety switch, you guessed it, he drove it thru a overhead door at full throttle. after that, no more 4 speeds were built in wilmington plant

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