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Cleaning bolt threads the easy way


West Peterson
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Have you ever had a bolt shoot out from your wire wheel and either hit you, or something valuable behind you? This new tool is not only faster in cleaning threads, but obviously much safer. It was recently viewed at the SEMA show in Las Vegas to rave reviews. I've got a set on the way already. Since most restorers would like to reuse original bolts, I thought I'd pass on the info.

http://threadwizard.us/

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I love tools but you can do the same thing with a matching nut, held in the vise and your driver or wrench and a shot of WD-40 or oil. Plus, this tool still leaves the head of the fastener untouched, so a trip to the wire wheel is still required

Overall, I give it a 3.5 out of 10

Pretty useless, IMO

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I often use a thread file. The die nut takes off too much, often. And if the start of the thread is damaged it is easy to destroy the bolt. The thread file makes it easy. Mine also has a small diameter on the end to do inside the nut. I also like to use phosphoric acid of one sort or another to clean up the rust then re-plate with zinc. Cadmium would be more correct but that is a bit toxic.

 

How long does the wire brush last inside that thing?

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I actually rather like this idea for quick, on the fly cleaning of the threads for most typical applications. Perhaps for higher level work one would prefer another method but this seems like a great compromise to me. If that little wire wheel inside is a standard size that can be acquired anywhere then all the better. I would use this for heavily greased bolts or even restoring many of the older unique bolt types we often encounter (and I always keep) when buying tool chests or cabinets for our antique business. Thanks for sharing.

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A client brought me a gizmo that he bought at Harbor Freight.

It was a canister that was maybe a gallon in size and had thousands of hard plastic pyramid shaped thingy's in it that were maybe about a quarter inch big. He would throw his rusty bolts in there and when he turned it on it would vibrate the rust off and leave the bolts fairly clean. I never used it but the idea looked good.

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Thanks West - looks interesting.  Might spring for that and I have a permanent "dent" in my forehead from the old wire-brush technique.  Got it working on the 1912 Triumph, where we had to try and save a lot of original hardware.  Just one quick question though - when do you have time to work on cars?   Let me know how you arrange that.

Terry

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Just one quick question though - when do you have time to work on cars?   Let me know how you arrange that.

Terry

Usually the only time I ever get a chance to work on my car is when I'm at a show or on a tour.  :wacko: 

This winter, I made the decision to store the car in my own garage so that I could easily go into the garage and do some things. Don't ask me how that's working out so far. :(

In regard to this thread cleaning tool, I agree that there are many other methods for accomplishing something better for restoration purposes. For me, when working on my car removing and replacing a part, and only needing a quick clean-up of the threads to put it back together, this tool would come in very handy.

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Heya Jack M,...that "gizmo" (don' get it wet, or feed it after midnight) sounds like a vibratory tumbler. They are great, and get nuts and bolts clean as a whistle. of course you have to de-grease anything you stick in the tumbler or it will crud up the abrasive media. The death of mine was overloading the thing. I generally observe instructions and owners manuals with a grain of salt,...but in this instance it would have been wise to adhere to them. Eastwood sells 'em, and so does Sears, as well as Harbour Freight. There's a pretty wide range in capacities and media. The big ones can get crazy expensive.

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I love tools but you can do the same thing with a matching nut, held in the vise and your driver or wrench and a shot of WD-40 or oil. Plus, this tool still leaves the head of the fastener untouched, so a trip to the wire wheel is still required

Overall, I give it a 3.5 out of 10

Pretty useless, IMO

One man's passion is another man's poison! Wayne

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as I take bolts, nuts, washers ect off they go into a coffee can with black strap molasses and water. two weeks later when I take them out they look like new. then I spray on some WD 40 and clean the coffee can that I used to store them because it has a description of what the bolts were for.

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as I take bolts, nuts, washers ect off they go into a coffee can with black strap molasses and water. two weeks later when I take them out they look like new. then I spray on some WD 40 and clean the coffee can that I used to store them because it has a description of what the bolts were for.

 

I like the molasses treatment as well. I have done it may times and is way cheap.

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