Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I also think the solid state vibrator is a good thing. However, one caution you should observe, that is stated even in my 1953 Buick owners manual is that you should always start the engine before turning the radio on. The reason is that you want the radio off whenever the starter motor is activated. When the starter motor is cranking the engine, battery voltage is somewhat reduced, but when the engine starts and the starter motor is disengaged it creates an "inductive kick" or voltage spike on the electrical system. This can, depending on the severity of the spike, damage a solid state vibrator and possibly other radio components even with a mechanical vibrator.

Joe, BCA 33493

Link to post
Share on other sites

We got back from Los Angeles yesterday and I was excited about finishing the radio project

 

I also think the solid state vibrator is a good thing. However, one caution you should observe, that is stated even in my 1953 Buick owners manual is that you should always start the engine before turning the radio on. The reason is that you want the radio off whenever the starter motor is activated. When the starter motor is cranking the engine, battery voltage is somewhat reduced, but when the engine starts and the starter motor is disengaged it creates an "inductive kick" or voltage spike on the electrical system. This can, depending on the severity of the spike, damage a solid state vibrator and possibly other radio components even with a mechanical vibrator.
Joe, BCA 33493

Thanks for the tip Joe, I will remember that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We got back from Los Angeles yesterday and I was looking forward to finishing the radio project. I went out to the garage and started gathering up the tools and parts needed to complete the job. After connecting the antenna wire to one running board and running the wire that connects it to the other running board I wanted to see if the radio would receive anything even though the car is in the garage.  I turned on the radio but nothing happened at all, then I noticed that I had left the ignition switch in the ON position the whole time I was in Los Angeles. The battery was as dead as dead can be. I have a little one and a half amp six volt charger that I connected but it will take two or more days for that to charge the battery fully. Its been on all night now and the battery is showing about 50% charge. The car has one of the replica maintenance free batteries in it and I'm hoping its still going to be ok, these batteries cost about 300 dollars from what I could see online. Anyway turned on the radio this morning to see what would happen and even with the car in the garage it received a couple of stations but not very good. It will probably do better once the car is outside. Maybe tonight the battery will be charged enough to try to start the car and go for a drive. The static eliminators that go in the front wheels and the noise suppressors that hook to the coil and the generator are not yet installed as I want to see how the radio works without them first. 


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just tried to start the car after many hours on the trickle charger and it started right up. We then decided to take it for a drive and see if the radio would work. I'm more than happy to say that after the tubes warmed up (about 20 seconds) it worked and worked good. For some reason it does not have ignition noise or static which surprises me. The radio picked up about 7 or 8 stations clearly and one of them plays hits of the past and the others were talk shows and news. This was another fun and interesting project, i like this old Buick more and more. I added this picture our friend took of my wife and I when we got home.

 

post-154011-0-20390100-1453169872_thumb.

Edited by LAS VEGAS DAVE (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone. Just my experiences. My '39 had running board antenna, only on the left side. There were no insulators on the right side. so the whole right side running board was grounded to the car frame. With only one running board

'working", you can imagine how bad the reception was. That was when I was in Upstate NY, and had several AM stations. When we moved to Florida, I have only one AM station near enough to receive well. I finally put a whip type antenna where many '30s had them, on the left side just ahead of the left door. Works much better. Just my experience with these AM radios.

I do remember back in the 1950's, when nearly all car radios were AM, at night we could receive stations from across the country, if they were so called "Clear Channel" stations, which I was told were allowed up to 50,000 watts output. This discussion brought back many memories.

Gary

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary, I was told that the radio was not tuned correctly for a whip style antenna so tuning it for one might be helpful. My experience after a few days playing with the radio is that the dual running board antenna works fairly good, at least here in Las Vegas. The radio receives about six stations clearly and several more but not so good. Compared to the radios I had in the fifties it works terrible as those received way more stations and much stronger.  In 1938 the automobile radio was still in its infancy, they seemed to get better very rapidly as the years went by. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone. Just my experiences. My '39 had running board antenna, only on the left side. There were no insulators on the right side. so the whole right side running board was grounded to the car frame. With only one running board

'working", you can imagine how bad the reception was. That was when I was in Upstate NY, and had several AM stations. When we moved to Florida, I have only one AM station near enough to receive well. I finally put a whip type antenna where many '30s had them, on the left side just ahead of the left door. Works much better. Just my experience with these AM radios.

I do remember back in the 1950's, when nearly all car radios were AM, at night we could receive stations from across the country, if they were so called "Clear Channel" stations, which I was told were allowed up to 50,000 watts output. This discussion brought back many memories.

Gary

 

There are still quite a number of Class A (clear-channel) stations broadcasting.  You might note that a local station that shares a frequency with a Class A will have to back their power down at sunset to prevent interference with the Class A station.  I remember sitting in my car one night in Wichita, Kansas listening to Ernie Harwell call a baseball game on WOAI San Antonio, and the reception was as clear as a bell from over 600 miles away.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in `67 I was headed to(Navy) the Los Angeles area in my old `47 Chevy with an AM radio and fender mounted antenna, I was headed west on 66 between Needles and Barstow on a clear night at 2am it was 102deg., and I was able to tune in KOMA(Oklahoma City), WNOE(New Orleans), and some Wolf-Man Jack on a LA station.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...