MrEarl

Need quick advice re Kelsey Hayes wire wheels

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Will be swapping from wires to plain rims on my Century. When I take the wheels and tires to have the tires removed, are there any precautions I need to spell out to the tire man to avoid damage. How about remounting in the future if I elect to go back with wires.?

 

 

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Ask the place you take the rims/tires to if they use a mag-machine.    I used these on every type of wheel and it is not as stressing to the wheel as a older style mounting machine.

 

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Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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Yes, my 3 speed Century.

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Are your tires run tubeless?  If not you want to do something to preserve the tubes.  You can use them in your steel wheels if you want, but if you do note that talc powder is spread inside the tire before installation of the 2nd bead and inflation of the tubes.

 

On the wire wheels, if you are not currently running tubeless, be sure that future installers do not cut the silicone seal around the valve stem hole to let the stem sit flatter against the rim. 

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Ask the place you take the rims/tires to if they use a mag-machine.    I used these on every type of wheel and it is not as stressing to the wheel as a older style mounting machine.

 

 

 

I'll see what they have, thanks Chris

 

Are your tires run tubeless?  If not you want to do something to preserve the tubes.  You can use them in your steel wheels if you want, but if you do note that talc powder is spread inside the tire before installation of the 2nd bead and inflation of the tubes.

 

On the wire wheels, if you are not currently running tubeless, be sure that future installers do not cut the silicone seal around the valve stem hole to let the stem sit flatter against the rim. 

Some good points John, The tires that are on the car now have tubes. Tires are dated 1988 so suspect tubes are also so will not be reusing them. The car has always been garaged and the tires still look good, NO CRACKS that I can see and good tread.

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I still have three 2003 tubes on the 56. I kept them in play as I hoped to have my WV rims repaired and put them back on the car.  They have not given me any trouble, but if there is reason to go into the current rims, I will be pulling the tubes out as well.

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gottem done, no problem. They did have the machine you mentioned Chris. Thanks for the help guys

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The Coats mag machines has saved many a rim from getting bent/scratched.   I spun tires for Mr. Tire and Goodyear.  This is my machine of choice as it was built to not harm wheels as tires are mounted.  It is nicely designed.

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)

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Ask the place you take the rims/tires to if they use a mag-machine.    I used these on every type of wheel and it is not as stressing to the wheel as a older style mounting machine.

 

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This is off topic but Chris:  Can you please expand on this machine.  For example, would this Mag Machine be the tool of choice to remove tires from a set of Speedline RUF forged aluminum 1st generation wheels made in Italy in the eighties that have the run flat technology outer rim ? The fronts are 8 x 17 and the rears are 10 x 17.  It would be scary and risky I would think to have someone with a standard spin / slide wedge bar setup attempt to remove tires off of these rims for fear of marring and possibly destroying this outer run flat rim and the delicate machine surface mark treatment on the rim as the rims are worth around $ 3,500 for a set of 4.

 

Edit: I bring this point up as I have heard there is a special wheel/tire machine out there for using on this kind of wheel but it was called something else if I recall.

 

 

 

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Edited by buick man (see edit history)

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Buick Man,  this machine does come with plastic coverings for the pry bar and swing arm assembly that contacts the wheel. Also, the swing arm portion that peels off the bead from the rim has a roller that rides the lip of the rim. Further, the swing arm can be locked just off the bead portion of the rim so as not to touch it.    The clamp used to secure the rim can clamp from the outside or can be closed, rim placed on the turn table and opened so it contacts and secures the rim from the inside. 

 

Further, this machine was designed for expensive wheels that are low profiles.  The machine has been available since the late 80's. I first used one at Mr. Tire(local MD tire dealer) and Goodyear for 11 years.    I handled low pros on Vettes/Camaros and a Ferraris owned by a customer down the street from my shop.  These rims also costly but not as costly as RUF rims.

 

To add, the bead is broken by a clamp on the side that uses the back of the rim as the support and the clamp arm on the bead closes breaking the bead from the rim. Also as stress free as I have used. 

 

So, to answer the question, I would clamp from the inside thus not touching rim where the bead mets the rim.  The pry bar would be covered in it's special plastic cover.  The pry bar only is in use for getting the bead up to the swing arm, removed, and arm then peels off the tire as the table spins.  It is as stress free on a rim during the process of removing a tire I have used.   Yes, I would have no issue using this machine to work tires off a set of RUF rims.  This machine is designed for such wheels.

 

 

Now this puppy here will ruin an aluminum mag wheel in no time.  The stress is on the center of the wheel.  The arm that breaks the bead pushes the edge of the rim and creates much stress on the center of the wheel.  The pry bar pries up the bead and also spins on the center post scraping along as it goes.  This is ok for older steel wheels but is truly outdated for tire work on todays modern wheels.  Modern meaning aluminum mags.

 

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Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)

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Back in the 60s I worked in a Flying "A" gas station and we used a hand machine. No air or motors all muscle. On a good day I could change out a set of 4 tires in 40 minutes.

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Back in the 60s I worked in a Flying "A" gas station and we used a hand machine. No air or motors all muscle. On a good day I could change out a set of 4 tires in 40 minutes.

 

 

We did keep the older tools for tire removal as sometimes they were needed or the new tools just did not work.      

 

I never did split rims.   Those always scared me.  Once a co-worker did a split rim.   When completed he put the tire assembly outside.  Not much later did we hear what sounded like a shotgun.  The ring portion of the split rim had blow off and when sailing over a 4 lane local main road that our store was situated on.  That did it for me. No split rims.

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Then there is this......run like the wind if you see this in the shop!

 

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I had one of those bend a rim from a 54 Plymouth once.  On the other hand I would like to have had one to service a tire when we lived in the country.  Situation:  Come out in the morning and tire is flat, spare has been flat for weeks.  Jack up with bumper jack, remove tire.  Use buddy's car to drive over tire to break the bead, repeat on other side.  Pull inner tube out after using assorted lug wrenches, screw drivers to pull the bead away on front side, pump up with hand pump to find hole and glue on a 'cold patch'.  Install tube and using assorted lug wrenches, screw drivers and hammer install tire on rim.  Pump up with hand pump and put tire back on car and head to the dance.  We could have driven the tire and spare to town for a proper fix, but then there would be no beer money!

Willie

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