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1912 Studebaker info DESPARATELY needed


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HELP!!!<P>I have found what I have been told is a 1912 Studebaker Touring. I am contemplating buying it. I can find no info on 1912 Stude's. HCCA roster lists none. Price Guides do not have a listing. Studebaker Club home page has a reference page that shows a 1912 and the pic and description match up (except the one I found is a Touring, and the web site has a picture of a Roadster.<P>How can I ID this car. It is in bad shape. Has the wrong wheels. Is missing the cowl lights, tail light, horn, radiator cap and filler neck. Maybe more. <P>Please respond and help me!!!!<P>Thanks<P>John (potential Studebaker Owner)

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Since your car is missing parts that could help I.D. it correctly you can only guess at this point. There were no "true" Studebaker's built in 1912. From 1904 to 1911 they are Studebaker-Garfords and then in 1913 the first complete Studebaker was built. During 1909 through 1912 the EMF & Flanders were built and sold through the Studebaker dealer network and are considered by many to be Studebakers, it was the EMF/Flanders factory that Studebaker took over in Feb. 1911 as the basis for building their own cars. 1912 "EMF's" and "Flanders" were sold by Studebaker until they could get their own models into production. "Flanders" were sold into 1913, the last "EMF" was sold in 1912. The first full Studebaker was in 1913.<BR> Now for your problem. Since you are being given information that may or may not be true as to the age of your car you need to look at what you do have and go with that. Check the engine. Look for a stamped in engine number (not a raised casting number) an engine number will be hand stamped into the metal of the block - not - a raised casting number. Measure the wheel base, measure both sides and then divide by 2. The wheel base for a 1913 Studebaker Model E 6 cyl. has a 121 inch wheel base. The 1913 SA"25" model 4 cyl. has an 102 inch wheel base, The 1913 Model AA"35" has a 115 inch wheel base. There should be a serial number tag on the frame or cowl. Also check for the type of engine design (a Flanders for example will have a 4 cyl. engine with cast in block construction with the exhaust manifold cast into the block). Also check to see if the transmission is part of the rear end, this was an early design that ended with the 1917 models. Look your car over very carefully, look for specific details and any numbers on the body, cowl, frame or engine that might help ID your car. Let me know and we will go from there.<BR>Mark Huston<p>[This message has been edited by ASCwebmaster (edited 06-20-2000).]

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More info on 1912??? Studebaker:<P>The plate on the firewall says:<P>"Manufactured by THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION<BR>EMF FACTORIES DETROIT MICH USA<BR>SERIAL NUMBER 44822"<P>THis looks ALOT like a 1912 EMF but the windshild is slanted. It has a rear treansaxle. THe engine is a 4 cyl. with the cylinders cast in pairs. Aluminum crankcase (I think). The headlights say EMF 30 (I think). Also, the hubcaps say EMF. The radiator has a Studebaker emblem on it, but looks like an EMF. The headlight bar curves in toward the radiator like a 1912 EMF. The spare tire carrier on the Driver Side (Right Hand Drive) is the same as a 1912 EMF.<P>Does this info help at all? THanks for the response above.<P>John<BR>

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