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Insert rods and bearings 1937-1949 Series 40-50


Dynaflash8
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Well guys, I sent a letter to the editor of ANTIQUE AUTOMOBILE regarding the Dynaflow story that appeared a couple of issues ago.  I disagreed that the 1950 Series 40 Special had Dynaflow offered.  I was wrong!  I made the assumption based on the fact that the 1950 Special, introduced in about June 1950 still had the 248cid engine, while the 1950 Super had stepped up to the 263cid engine.  You what what assumption means, right?  Well, I didn't check my chassis parts book before I shot off my mouth.  I have been roundly beat about the head and shoulders from readers.  So my apology is in order.  What I said about insert connecting rod bearings and rods in the 1950 Series 40 being able to be substituted for the old babbit bearing rods remains true.  I have no idea why the 248cid engine was continued in the Series 40, but the Series 50 got the new 263cid engine in 1950, but it is what it is.  No so-called expert knows everyting off the top of their head and I'm here to tell you, it always pays to check your sources before opening your mouth or using your pen!

 

Earl Beauchamp BCA #55

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The EZ way to tell a 263 from a 248 is that the 263 has a vertical rib on each cylinder on the exterior side of the block, and they do have hydraulic lifters. I think the 263 was made 3 years..

 

 Almost right.  263 built four years.  Yes, 1950 had inserts.  1949, I believe, saw ALL Buick's with inserts. The shop manual indicates all 263s have hydraulic lifters, but have heard some with manual transmission had mechanical.  Yes, a 263 will bolt in to your 1938. You would need to transfer the front plate, containing the motor mount, from your engine.  Also would need to use the 1938 bell housing or fly wheel housing, whichever you call it. This has the back motor mounts for the 1938.  The ribs  pont35cp is talking about are on the drivers side.  I have read these are to strengthen the block.

 

  Ben

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 Almost right.  263 built four years.  Yes, 1950 had inserts.  1949, I believe, saw ALL Buick's with inserts. The shop manual indicates all 263s have hydraulic lifters, but have heard some with manual transmission had mechanical.  Yes, a 263 will bolt in to your 1938. You would need to transfer the front plate, containing the motor mount, from your engine.  Also would need to use the 1938 bell housing or fly wheel housing, whichever you call it. This has the back motor mounts for the 1938.  The ribs  pont35cp is talking about are on the drivers side.  I have read these are to strengthen the block.

 

  Ben

Ben if I understand you right there was a 248 engine made in 1950 that had inserts, is that correct? Is the 263 with hydraulics still the same motor mounts and dimensions as the 263 that had solid lifters? Will my bellhousing bolt to the the hydraulic lifter 263 without modifications.  I am thinking of trying to find a 263 with hydraulics and rebuilding it for a long term project. 

Edited by LAS VEGAS DAVE (see edit history)
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The internals of the 263 cid will generally not interchange with 248 cid engines.  Some gaskets, the oil pump does, and other bits and pieces,but not the rods, pistons, ect.  ...the important parts.  And yes, the 1950 Special had the 248 cid and all of the guts interchange with 1j937-1949 248 cid, or at least most all...I'd better be careful and qualify myself there.  Always use a 1941-53 oil pump in a 1937-1940 Buick 40-50, and I think (guessing again) it will work in the 1934-1936 Special, or at least the gears and bottom plate.  No books here in the motel, only memory.  Read what I just wrote in the post-WWII section.  Use 1950 rods and insert bearings.  Another point is that the water pump and thermostat housing of a 1950 motor is like the later 263 engine and will not interchange backward to 1949 and earlier.

 

Finally thanks for all the kind comments concerning my post about my letter to the editor of Antique Automobile.

 

 

Earl Beauchamp  BCA #55

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Ben if I understand you right there was a 248 engine made in 1950 that had inserts, is that correct? Is the 263 with hydraulics still the same motor mounts and dimensions as the 263 that had solid lifters? Will my bellhousing bolt to the the hydraulic lifter 263 without modifications.  I am thinking of trying to find a 263 with hydraulics and rebuilding it for a long term project. 

 

 

  Dave, yes to the first two questions. I think yes on #3, as well. Please be aware that you will need a 263 from a STANDARD transmission car. The clutch/tranny end of the Dynaflow crankshaft is  slightly different. It can be modified. Just be aware of that.

 

  Have you ever been on teambuick.com web site? Lots of info on straight there.

 

 

  Ben

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Guest buickguyflint

I found  it interesting that when they went to inserts for the 248cu that rods were interchangable with

babbitted rods on earlier small series as they weigh the same and Buicks could be serviced by changing

only the rods needing replacement. Jim

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