Jump to content

New TV Show! This Saturday Night! Don't Miss!


Steve Moskowitz
 Share

Recommended Posts

There are many shows that don't pay their own way. All wrestling shows, most, if not all, religious programming, many sports shows like fishing and hunting, while enjoyable, are actually paid commercials, however subtle they may be. Maybe AACA could explore that avenue? Produce a series of shows sponsored by those companies that make money off the hobby. Same with books. Many authors pay a fee to Border's and the like for shelf space and the privilege of having book signings. A significant portion of local TV stations' income is dependent on these sponsored shows.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob, actually the show you are talking about may already exist! :D What new car show does not also include some attractive girl or young tatted up girl to "add" to the show.  In some form or fashion the contrived crap keeps being repeated and repeated despite the fact that we have heard that the cable networks are tired of reality.  Based on the new shows I have seen I have to question that...

 

Don, the money to do a new show is and has been available.  Being able to produce a show is not the issue.  Getting the network to run it is the major challenge.  Putting a show on some obscure cable channel is a possibility but to spend that time and money for relatively small numbers of viewers makes no sense. Many years ago TV networks would buy programming.  They do not have to do that anymore and actually in many cases it is the other way around. It is a tough business to crack and I think I heard numbers like 250 new shows a month being offered to the Discovery network alone (it might be a week).

 

I guess one of the reasons I have been doing what I can to promote the new series is that at least we are getting something out of a show. The show this Saturday is a good one and I think each feature is with an AACA member so I am happy for us.  I will always take it as a personal challenge to get some shows about car history produced but I may be in a pine box when the tide turns and this type of programming comes back.   

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

years ago there was show on PBS called "Connections" and was all about tracing back major events to the people and conditions that led to them happening. When you start talking about people like Billy Durant and Boss Kettering or Bunkie Knudson (have a GM background) and how they influenced the decisions that were made.

Plus all of the companies who had a great idea but found that was not enough or a critical person died and I suspect you have a basis for something.

Years ago I had a reel of Pontiac commercials ranging from about 1957 to 1978 on a VHS that became a three hour talk at a convention about the times and events that led to them and why they were important. That was fun.

ps near as I can tell the current crop of shows are tightly intertwined and the same people keep showing up in different places. Did notice the JC Taylor license plate at various points. SyFy channel is worse (see Colin Ferguson often and is even parodied occasionally).

So the best was to breakin is as a spinoff. Hmmmm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob, actually the show you are talking about may already exist! :D What new car show does not also include some attractive girl or young tatted up girl to "add" to the show.  In some form or fashion the contrived crap keeps being repeated and repeated despite the fact that we have heard that the cable networks are tired of reality.  Based on the new shows I have seen I have to question that...

 

Don, the money to do a new show is and has been available.  Being able to produce a show is not the issue.  Getting the network to run it is the major challenge.  Putting a show on some obscure cable channel is a possibility but to spend that time and money for relatively small numbers of viewers makes no sense. Many years ago TV networks would buy programming.  They do not have to do that anymore and actually in many cases it is the other way around. It is a tough business to crack and I think I heard numbers like 250 new shows a month being offered to the Discovery network alone (it might be a week).

 

I guess one of the reasons I have been doing what I can to promote the new series is that at least we are getting something out of a show. The show this Saturday is a good one and I think each feature is with an AACA member so I am happy for us.  I will always take it as a personal challenge to get some shows about car history produced but I may be in a pine box when the tide turns and this type of programming comes back.   

 I was in the car business all my life, but also in those years I did A LOT of house renovation / remodel. All the shows on DIY or HGTV are just like the cars shows. When HGTV first started it was great, but something happened to it just like the speed channel. With all that said there is one channel that does have restoration, renovation of houses and it's been consistent in it's quality for 40 years. Today the only guy's that have my respect are the guy's on This Old House.

 So what about PBS? What about Smithsonian? 

Edited by helfen (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a shame to me, my opinion of course, that a television show that the AACA is both involved in and promoting is just about 100% about the MONEY aspect of the hobby.

 

I totally agree with David about this comment BUT after watching cable TV car shows for the last 10-15 years I have decided that the money fixation seems inescapable.  Years ago I realized that here in the Midwest few local car people know of Hershey at all; an event primarily about restoring, preserving, and prizing old cars.   But EVERYONE knows the TV auctions and Barrett-Jackson is considered the biggest and best venue of all, an event primarily promoting buying and selling cars as baubles for rich speculators (they have been marketing geniuses with this).  I support anything that gets a little grassroots old car love out for public viewing and hope that with a foot in the door we can kick it up in quality as things progress.  I guess show 'em the money first and then hopefully encourage viewers that the hobby can be inclusive for regular people too beyond just flipping cars, Todd C    

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just wish I knew how I could be of assistance wth this since have a lot of obscure information.

 

Agree B-J and Dana are marketting geniuses who also realize the value of keeping those with wealth well lubricated. Theirs is a different world from most forum members.

 

Do think of the antics of a few of the floor(wo)men would be considered assault in some states.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For obvious reasons I have been reluctant to post on the topic here. However, I think there are a couple of items I can address which may shed some light on certain aspects of the show. First of all we have to thank a lot of people for watching, and the majority who have been positive about the show.

Im not quite sure where to start here other than to say I first joined AACA at age 13, so it is near and dear as are the cars and all of my many friends who are now part of my extended AACA family. Several years ago, as Steve may have mentioned, several of us began talking about how to associate with or somehow bring a show to television, which would at least publicize our organization among the many unaffiliated thousands who do watch the programs available on Velocity and similar venues. In order to have the uninitiated appreciate AACAs segment of the hobby, they need to know we are here.

Too often these days most programming is dedicated to the high end or to chop cut rebuild shows. Its no longer the day when Ed Hermann hosted "Automobiles" on History Channel which was a GREAT show. Things have changed, and it can be argued whether that is good or bad ...nonetheless AACA efforts to get programming didnt succeed to this point.

A couple of years ago I was asked to do some consulting work for a production company which allowed me to gain some insight into the industry from both the production and network side. I applied that insight and newly gained knowledge when I contacted the Executive Director and owner of the company which now produces the Appraisers. He had an idea for a new show, and was somewhat receptive to weaving our segment of the hobby into the show. We talked and met many times as I was not originally going to be part of talent, but only work behind the scenes. Ultimately, I was asked to present as opposed to consulting only, and I invited Chris Ritter to audition. He did well, they liked him. The producers recruited Ben Neff, and the rest is history.

Every year Velocity receives well over 1,000 pitches for shows to take the few available open slots. We were quite fortunate to make it to air against those odds. Unfortunately, if this show fails, it will likely be replaced by a Chop, Cut, Slam, program or something very similar...so, Its hard to make it to air and also to sell a show which is exclusively representative of the AACA segment of the hobby.

Thankfully to this point most of the viewer feedback has been positive. I know we will never satisfy everyone or come even close. That is a fact of life.
To those who are on the fence, I ask you to consider a few points

1. This is a first year production, and there are learning curves etc. It simply isnt going to be perfect in content, delivery, or in personalities for that matter.
2. We did not have Jay Leno or Top Gears budget, and probably wont ever have that.
3. The Executive Producer did produce family programming with no gratuitous cussing and drama. What humor is injected is our own...good or bad. We own it ; )
4.This is the first time AACA has had the opportunity to receive this much on air National and Worldwide attention. Whether you like the show or not, we are causing the uninitiated to ask about and investigate who AACA is and that is a plus.
5. We were not scripted...not AT ALL...tough to do, we should all have to go through that ; )
6. We will feature cars that you dont like...we will even feature cars I dont like, but if you will check out the website photo gallery at
   http://www.appraiserstv.com/gallery.html   You will see some of the cars featured in future episodes. I think all of us will find a lot to like about those featured for the remainder of the season. As presenters we can suggest, but both the Network and Producer have ideas as well. They do listen though.
7. We feature cars all of makes, models, sizes, and values as you will see if you watch the entire show season. We cannot simply appeal to any one grouping as it wont support viewership, and again we get replaced by chop, cut, slam.
8. If you have suggestions, or if something crosses you (no chance of that happening on this forum right? : ) ) . Don't just complain. Try helping to make it better through your input..email me and I will pass along suggestions  tntoldcarz@gmail.com . Remember, this is the first season.
9. In short, it aint perfect. We serve many masters. Watch the show, you will find something to like. Preserve its position/slot by watching and telling others to do the same because its gong to be hard to get another shot in the near future. After you watch, be sure to email and tell us how much and why you loved or hated it, but most importantly try to be helpful through suggestions. We have already made note of many,....and if you dont like me, Ritter is one heck of a great guy!...something or someone for everyone . Thanks for giving it a look and watching : )

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry but you are talking about the first generation that created the wealth (and few would be at an auction since they tend to not retire). Many I've seen in the sky boxes during prime time don't need to ask the price, is more emotional.

Best deals are usually on the first day & mornings unless there is something specific.

Note: these are generalities, there are always a few genuine motorheads who also have money but are unlikly to have a fluted glass or be far from the runway..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7. We feature cars all of makes, models, sizes, and values as you will see if you watch the entire show season. We cannot simply appeal to any one grouping as it wont support viewership, and again we get replaced by chop, cut, slam.

 

8. If you have suggestions, or if something crosses you (no chance of that happening on this forum right? : ) ) . Don't just complain. Try helping to make it better through your input..email me and I will pass along suggestions  tntoldcarz@gmail.com . Remember, this is the first season.

9. In short, it aint perfect. We serve many masters. Watch the show, you will find something to like. Preserve its position/slot by watching and telling others to do the same because its gong to be hard to get another shot in the near future. After you watch, be sure to email and tell us how much and why you loved or hated it, but most importantly try to be helpful through suggestions. We have already made note of many,....and if you dont like me, Ritter is one heck of a great guy!...something or someone for everyone . Thanks for giving it a look and watching : )

 

 

Thanks Tom for your concise explanation of how The Apprai$ers came to be; I didn't quote your entire post, as it's already there for all to see. Knowing you and Chris, I never thought for one moment that you were scripted, but foreknowledge of the cars you'd be featuring certainly gave you lead time to ponder your approach to each vehicle.

 

I'm still amazed that the show debuted in prime time Saturday, rather than being buried in a slot competing with infomercials about memory-foam pillows and "collectible" gilded coins. It gives global exposure to the AACA and for that, all involved should be very proud. We now have probably the world's best club publication, and a prime time TV show with mass appeal. Way to go!

 

Thanks for including contact info for feedback, and best wishes for the show's continued success. 

 

TG

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, thanks Tom, excellent post and a look behind the scenes.

 

We who criticize often don't think of the effort and work that it takes to produce and air such a show, as mentioned many are pitched but few are chosen.

 

I also know from my slight exposure to filming that sometimes it is exciting, sometimes it is boring.  I was once on a set with Jack Warden, and I asked him (during a bout a 2 hour break between scene shots) about all the time spent not acting (I worded it in a way that didn't sound like "is it always this boring?").  His response, talking about an acting life and with a grin, was "it has it's moments"....

 

Thanks to you, Chris, and Ben for your efforts!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 Buick, I agree with you 100% about Steve.  He seemed like a terrific guy, great sense of humor but his love for his cars really showed.  Maybe not the cars everyone on this forum like but it is great to see someone who enjoys cars like he does.  Of course if I got to drove one of those regularly I might have a sunnier disposition too!  

Link to comment
Share on other sites




("I understand economics, and the things that drive getting a show on the air aren't always the things that everybody wants to see.  Sure better than watching The Rifleman reruns!)


 


 


I wasn't going to chime in here until I read this scathing comment made by a member about the Rifleman television show.  Of course you know that offhand opinions like this can cause serious harm where it hurts.  I'll have to sell my Rifleman Lunch box with thermos now before this catches on and the price goes down!!


 


I read the posts about the new show and wasn't all that excited but I did call  a car friend and told him about it.  I watched the first episode and it reminded me of “What’s My Car Worth”. I looked at what cars were on the second and bailed.  Now I know that the show is new so I will not be critical of it but instead offer some suggestions.  I agree with trimcar about the MONEY aspect.  Every show has “BIG PAYDAY" as it's underlying beat except for one and it is my favorite one right now.  Jay Leno's Garage is a great show because it doesn't promise anything so how could it disappoint. We all know that Jay is a car guy and he's out having a good time and taking us with him.  What a novel approach!  NO money is changed hands except for his salary and he looks like he would do it for nothing but the fun of it.   "The Appraiser" is going to show some appraisals of cars that I might care about or might not.  Odds aren't good and I have diverse interests.  Why not take one model for the full half hour and give me a visual version of Classic Car magazine.  Make me interested in it.  Why would I care if the dash should be woodgrained  if I don't care about the car. Does it have some strange options?  A record player under the dash??  You must be kidding me!  That's INTERESTING.


 

I used to watch "Chasing Classic Cars that end in a vowel" just to see how much money he would lose on a car.   Wayne is told about car,  travels to get  car,  fixes car in five minutes,  brings car to auction attended by people with clever accounting practices,  hopefully sells car.  It's not all about the chase it's about the MONEY.  People applauding when the car goes over ten million one week, twenty the next.


 


Something happened to "Chasing Classic Cars that end in a vowel" last week.  Wayne found a REAL car.  The Stutz episode was viewed multiple times in this household.  This was the closest to what the show should always have been. I would have liked more info about the car.  What was offered by Stutz .  Other surviving examples.  More on the cars repair, etc..  If you must have the auction then show it over the credits.   This week they had a 1910 Buick model 16.  A great car that needed more air time.  I can't remember if they ever had a Buick on there.  It ends in a "k" but it was painted RED.


 


The Appraiser should actually show the experience of searching, buying, restoring or cleaning up an original, and KEEPING it.  The appraiser comes in to play when buying the car to make sure everything is right with it.  His superior knowledge would help if the project hits a wall but wouldn’t it be nice to use the members of the AACA as the “copilot” in the project.  Social Media can allow suggestions to be sent to the show after each episode.   This would take up a number of shows.  Maybe have  a few projects going on at the same time but with regular car folks not DEALER involvement.  The members are an untapped resource.  Follow all of this on the show’s website also. 


 


 How about a segment, “My first car”  where an AACA member hunts for his first with the help of the Appraiser.  Think "America's Most Wanted" but with cars. Some fine upstanding gentleman sitting at home  sees


a guy on the show looking for a certain car and his neighbor has the same model sitting in the garage for years.  The Appraiser shows up and looks at the car with the neighbor and the owner to make sure it checks out then they call the lucky dude who gets to relive his youth.  Could be me looking for a dark red 1973 Camaro LT.  Lots of background story there.  Why he had sell it,  etc..  I would tune in every week to see how the searches are going.  My actual car was junked in 1992 in Connecticut but have been looking for years for its’ twin.


 


I hope that I made some sense to somebody out there in TV land.  I will give the show a chance to find itself  but have a feeling that I won’t be parting with my “Chasing Classic Cars”  lunch box anytime soon.


 

( opinions expressed or implied in the above are just my opinion and really should be taken as such. I’m just one of thousands of grumpy old men getting more grumpy every day. ) 

Edited by bubba (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First of all, given Mr. Moskowitzs last comment about having a sunnier disposition like "Lambo" Steve, makes me think we should fundraise to buy one for Mr. Moskowitz!!! Although the thought of him being chipper all the time is pretty disconcerting : ). Nah....we're used to him as he is.

 

Steve was a great guy to work with. He loves the exotic cars ,and its written all over him. He's a great guy. Frankly the honest truth is that every last person we worked with was absolutely fantastic, and I am not embellishing that. We can all be proud that our hobby has such great people in it. The best part of this whole experience was talking to and getting to know that car owners. It was great!!

 

Yes the perspective of being directly in the mix is interesting...Im sure we could have been bored between on camera times, but having no lines etc...we were busy stressing out... to make sure we covered what we could on camera about the cars etc. since it wasn't scripted.

 

Also, as mentioned, certain aspects before, during, and after editing can be annoying...heck I annoyed myself on occasion, so some annoyances will exist...course that happens here on the forums now and then too ; ) .

 

The MONEY issue comes up a lot, and I understand why some of you have issues with it, but its a fact of life. People like to know what everything is worth...not all of us mind you, but a very large percentage nonetheless, and the Networks, Sponsors, and Producers cant simply ignore that...especially today when there is so much fragmentation of the viewing audience. You have to appeal to the largest potential audience at times. You have to make money to stay on the air unless you have a guaranteed funding source similar to an infomercial or other promotional programming.

 

Even Jay Lenos show ,which many seem to like, has Money/value woven into the show via David Osborne's segment.  He and Jay discuss the valuation and return on investment of three cars, pitting them against each other to determine which is the best investment.

 

Bubba (above) mentions a reunion type of show, I briefly worked with a production company that was contemplating a show based upon re uniting people with lost cars or cars exactly like ones they had in high school etc. but it was doomed due to the HIGH budget they required. Im sure someone is out there working on that concept yet.

 

We hope you will keep watching and giving us suggestions while finding something to like. Send them to me tntoldcarz@gmail.com .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"heck I annoyed myself on occasion"...not as much as you annoyed the rest of the crew I am told! :D  Tom, keeps giving you guys more info on the "whys" of this show and I hope it helps you to better understand the world he now is involved in.  I will keep stressing that in order for the antique car hobby to get more publicity, the AACA and a show that will be renewed you need to keep giving it a chance and let the show get better in coming years.  Again, this week's episode has a GREAT segment with a true car guy with a somewhat Horatio Alger story (yes I know his stories were a myth).  A local guy who is a graduate of Milton Hershey School has gone on to lead a successful life and a hard earned wonderful collection. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sheesh, I didn't know my comment about The Rifleman was scathing.  I actually liked and like the show, of course now I'm kinda shocked they show it on reruns, a man who solves all his problems with a rifle.  Hmmmmm...

 

The Model 16 Buick shown on CCC was a nice one, but, since I have one and am both versed in the model and egotistical, there were numerous things not historically correct with the car that he found.  It still sold for a good sum, in fact it was.....oh, wait, I'm the one who complained about dollars, so never mind!  I was a little apprehensive about how Wayne cranked the car, did anyone notice?  Crank at 2 o'clock position and he pushed down to start....a really good way to get a Ford Fracture (look it up, it's real)....

 

I hereby retract any scathing comments made on this forum, good job to all concerned getting the AACA name on prime time television, go forth and....ummmm...have more shows!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave,  Now that you bring it up I did notice something strange about he way he started it.  Maybe he couldn't get it going and they just put in the sound effect of it starting later.  Will have to watch it again.   Nothing on TV is what it appears to be.  I think I gave you a copy of the Buick 16's owner or parts manual.  Somebody bought that 16 not knowing what wasn't correct or maybe they did and just didn't mind.  All I know about them is that motor has a problem with the jugs cracking.  

 

Tom, as to the David Osborne segment on the Leno show,  it did bother me on the first show but they do it with interesting cars.  I have only seen one "Owen Magnetic" in my life . I guess the money segment is there to appeal to the masses like you say but it is informative.  My favorite show of his was when he pulled the Deusenberg out of the garage in Burbank I believe.  I was yelling at the set, wanting them to tell us what the other car was hiding under the junk in the garage. They never mentioned it.  There are so many ideas that can be auto related.  The car is woven into our lives.  I always wondered what today would be like if the car was never invented and everything else happened the same way. Midtown Manhattan at rush hour has everybody on horseback trying to text.  There's a show and it ain't about nothing.  (copywrite under the laws of the USA),  Hey, money is money.

 

All kidding aside I wish the guys involved with the show the best of luck.   I was in the biz for 22 years and it's dog eat dog.

Edited by bubba (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The entire history of how the car has helped make America great has not been told in depth.  Bugs me but we will keep trying to find someone who might want to do a documentary some day...Ken Burns are you listening!

 

A documentary by Ken Burns like that would be awesome!  Sure enjoyed his "baseball" series some years ago.

 

 

Cort :) www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve | 1979 Caprice Classic  (awaiting new owner)
"It's snowing in the pines" __ Alabama __ 'Christmas In Dixie'
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Velocity ran the third episode tonight. Once again the music was playing when they were talking. There is nothing wrong with music, but not playing when someone is trying to give a history lesson about Milton Hershey, or any of the cars that were featured. Chris had a full interview with Keith Miller about the Pierce Arrow with music competing for attention. It didn't matter which interview, constant competition by the music. There was a rerun of the first episode and the part about the 41 60S Cadillac Chris said the Cadillac weighed 3,700 lbs. I had read something about the 48-49 Cadillac switch of flat head V-8 to OHV V-8 and they said Cadillac had cut the weight of the engine by several hundred lbs. Turns out the old flathead weighed in at about close to 1,000 lbs. So I went to my standard Cadillac book and found the weight of a 41 60S # 6019S at 4,230 lbs. and a 41 6019SF at 4,290.

This is not a endorsement of Ruf manufacturing, It is only one part out of four parts. The point I'm trying to make is how to use music appropriately when talking about history or describing cars. This You Tube of Ruf history show how to do these kind of things with class. I would like Steve, Tom to view this so they can suggest to the producers and show how music can be use effectively without the wife bolting out of the room or the viewer going crazy trying in vain to control the volume. Please view this;

RUF History part 1 - YouTube

Video for ruf history▶ 9:29

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Point well taken on the suggestion related to the music. I've already passed the input here along, and I believe it would receive the attention you would like in a second season.

 

Just finished reviewing the show on tape last night Tom. I did not even notice the music in the background of the show, was well done. 

 

On another note though? I would have lost $100.00 just like Ben. I was sure that '56 Corvette was worth $100,000. Maybe the powerglide turned them off? I was also surprised to see what the woodie brought too. You can surely (don't call me Shirley) understand why I'm not in the appraisal business! :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Automotive shows need to take a lesson from the  FLIPPING TRAILERS show.

 

No BS, just showing how they do their work, and the B4 and after results.  We all know work places have their employee fights/disagreements, but we don't need/want to see them, give us the NUTS and BOLTS of the operation.  to many producers want to be CUTE.

 

Dale in Indy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just finished reviewing the show on tape last night Tom. I did not even notice the music in the background of the show, was well done. 

 

The reason you have a problem noticing it is because not only have TV shows, but also the film industry have been abusing our ears very gradually. Ever sit in a movie theater lately watching almost any movie? You sometimes need ear attenuators! You should have picked up on this. Even a TV news cast opening show themes blast you out of your chair. When this first started appearing it was the TV commercials. Don't you remember you would set the volume of your favorite show and be watching quite comfortably and then a commercial came on and blasted you out of your seat. Take some time and go back on you tube and watch a old TV series of the 50's or 60's and you will see the difference. Or watch a old movie. Listen to the soundtrack of Lalo Schifrin's music that he wrote for the movie Bullitt, or when he wrote themes for Mission Impossible or Mannix. Watch a few episodes of Peter Gunn and you will see how Henry Mancini coordinated his music with the series. The same hold true for Michele Legrand and his music for Steve McQueen's Movie LeMans or Thomas Crown affair.

Quincy Jones soundtrack for Steve McQueens movie The Getaway never got in the way of the dialog.

I remember a TV show with the host Arthur Godfrey doing a entire 1/2 hour on the "New" 1950 Pontiac line. The interview was with CE Wilson, Boss Kettering and Pontiac's General Manager Harry Clinger. There was NO need for music.

A friend who is a retired sound engineer from the movie industry is appalled what has been done in the industry, to the point he won't watch some of the shows. The days of spotting and dubbing, the music so that the music blends, but not interfere with the dialog are long over it seams.

Wayne...go back and see the difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just finished reviewing the show on tape last night Tom. I did not even notice the music in the background of the show, was well done. 

 

On another note though? I would have lost $100.00 just like Ben. I was sure that '56 Corvette was worth $100,000. Maybe the powerglide turned them off? I was also surprised to see what the woodie brought too. You can surely (don't call me Shirley) understand why I'm not in the appraisal business! :rolleyes:

 

I don't know how you did not hear it, The same A D and E Texas blues shuffle was used on all three shows, sort of reminds me a ZZ top riff in 1/2 time, there is no need for it especially over the speakers.

 

Please, someone explain to me how referring to Chris (the only character tied to the AACA through the show) as a 'car geek' delivers any positive message? I think it is great having a young face tied to the club

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just watched the third show. Am already hearing impaired but with my Sennheiser headset the voices were clear over the music & could just ignore it.

 

Was a little disappointed there were not more engine/interior shots.

 

One thing I did notice is that with all of the "stock is stock" comments on the forum, what I could see was that few of the cars displayed were.

 

ps hope I never make it to "collector", would rather remain an enthusiast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please, someone explain to me how referring to Chris (the only character tied to the AACA through the show) as a 'car geek' delivers any positive message? I think it is great having a young face tied to the club

 

Chris's own website and Facebook page is called, "The Car Geek Journal", and he wears the appellation as a badge of honor, not one of derision.

 

When your computer breaks down, you may take it to the "Geek Squad" for repairs, the company (within Best Buy) that recently posted an estimated $1-Billion in revenue. 

 

As for the connection to The Apprai$ers, here's my take, though he doesn't need anyone to answer for him. 

 

As a lifelong car guy (50 years-plus), an avid automotive history researcher and sometime writer, it's encouraging that the "Car Geek", Chris Ritter's, profession runs in the opening credits. It's downright refreshing that his passion is backed up with the vast resources of the AACA Library & Research Center; he knows where the cool stuff is and how to access and use it to the show's advantage.

 

Rather than basing their info on hearsay and what they've read on the Internet, the show actually has a librarian in its cast, something for which I am very grateful.

 

TG

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A bit off topic I know, but I heartily agree with the music is way too loud guys. Not only in this show but almost all shows. We often turn an otherwise interesting show off because we can't hear a word said because of the show's loud music sound track.........Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John, I appreciate you looking out for me but, as Tom (TG) pointed out, it's cool to be a "geek" these days. I've been called much worse! :-). Call me whatever you want but I do know that I am lucky to be part of a great team spreading the word about the old car hobby to an international audience.

I can echo Tom Cox's comments too that all constructive criticism is greatly appreciated as we think about future seasons. All of the episodes for season 1 are fully edited and composed as Velocity requested, and, spoiler alert, there's more music in future episodes! If the music is THAT distracting just start dancing - you can thank me for the exercise next time we meet at an AACA event.

Thanks to everyone for watching and supporting the show!

Chris

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just watched the third show. Am already hearing impaired but with my Sennheiser headset the voices were clear over the music & could just ignore it.

 

Was a little disappointed there were not more engine/interior shots.

 

One thing I did notice is that with all of the "stock is stock" comments on the forum, what I could see was that few of the cars displayed were.

 

ps hope I never make it to "collector", would rather remain an enthusiast.

I thought perhaps it might be helpful for me to comment on this, given that I could take constructive critique back to the producer, and also speak from a vantage point which is vastly different for obvious reasons. I have perused the forums regularly for years, but seldom got too much into the fray outside of pushing for action on Legislative issues affecting the hobby,...the main reason being that some of you guys seem to wake up on the wrong side of the bed too often and love to complain. Much of that contention is supported by the fact that none of you who are grousing the most have emailed once (I gave you my email) to make suggestions. Sorry, it is what it is, in my very humble opinion ; )

 

As to the comment above regarding episode 3 which states "few of the car displayed" were stock. I would point out that all of those cars are AACA eligible. I'm just sayin...... Frankly to my recollection, there are only two vehicles featured in the ​entire season which would not qualify to be shown in AACA if 25 years or older.

 

...and while I'm here, ; ) regarding Chris Ritters moniker of "Car Geek" . It is both an endearing as well as a positive statement about him and his level of experience and expertise. As a librarian with a Masters in Library Science Chris has earned the right to label himself as what modern interpretations of the word "geek" imply according to the latest Meriam Websters Dictionary; "an enthusiast or expert especially in a technological field or activity" . I don't think I could describe Ritter any better except to say that he is EXACTLY the type of person this hobby needs.

 

So,...now that I have probably ruffled your feathers, I will close by saying that we all need to relax a bit, and try to enjoy each other while promoting the heck out of our hobby because if we do not do that in every possible way that is available to us, our cars will have no caretakers in the future who respect their history or heritage. That is the truth, ....or we can be cantankerous and scare off all the newcomers and young people rather than imparting valuable knowledge to them which is fast disappearing. "HEY YOU KIDS...GET OFF MY LAWN" sound familiar?? : )

 

Thankfully there has been a lot of very positive feedback about the show along with good suggestions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

The reason you have a problem noticing it is because not only have TV shows, but also the film industry have been abusing our ears very gradually. Ever sit in a movie theater lately watching almost any movie?

 

"THE LAST MOVIE I WATCHED IN A THEATER WAS AN OLD SHERLOCK HOLMES MOVIE. AND YOU'RE RIGHT, THAT'S WHY I STOPPED GOING."  (Sorry for the caps!)

 

You sometimes need ear attenuators! You should have picked up on this. Even a TV news cast opening show themes blast you out of your chair. When this first started appearing it was the TV commercials. Don't you remember you would set the volume of your favorite show and be watching quite comfortably and then a commercial came on and blasted you out of your seat.

 

"DON'T HAVE THAT PROBLEM AS I EITHER MUTE THEM, OR MOST OF THE TIME, I TAPE THEM AND WATCH THEM 30-40 MINUTES LATER SKIPPING THROUGH ALL THOSE COMMERCIALS"

 

There was NO need for music.

 

"HERE'S THE DEAL. WE ARE VERY LUCKY TO HAVE OUR FIRST AACA TV SHOW. WE SHOULD BE VERY PROUD OF THIS AND NOT GRIPE ABOUT THE MUSIC. THESE FIRST SHOWS WERE DONE A VERY LONG TIME AGO, AND I'M SURE THERE WILL BE SOME CHANGES COMING UP WITH THE NEXT NEW GROUP. I'M SO PLEASED THAT TOM AND CHRIS HAVE TAKEN AWAY FROM THEIR PERSONAL TIME, AND BUSINESS TIME IN TOM'S CASE TO WORK WITH THIS SHOW. AS I SAID EARLIER, JOB WELL DONE!"

 

Wayne

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...