Recommended Posts

Well this becomes interesting.  Yes, you have a 3rd week of December build date.  Yes you have windows that are pressed into a channel, and yes your doors bolt to the hinge from the door jamb.  My 03C built '64 has the same door bolts but has the bolt on window glass.  Perhaps a mid year production change.   Too bad those curved adjustment arms are not interchangeable side for side. 

 

Now, I want everyone who owns a '64 to 1) take a picture of the data plate, and 2) pull a door skin and take a picture of the way the window is fastened to the regulator.*

 

 

Does anyone have a collection of service bulletins that may address this?

 

You noticed that my earlier post #22, that I said most of the time it was only the driver's side that was broken - I see that your passenger's side is still intact.  We manly men and our determination to get that door shut tight - grab the top of the window and give it a hard fling.  The more gentile sex doesn't tear things up like we guys do so their stuff survives.  I have a few older bicycles - nine in fact, the earliest is a 1935 Elgin, and the newest is am '84 Schwinn - both boys and girls bikes.  The boys bikes I find are usually wrecks - dented fenders, broken spokes, bent pedals, scuffed seats, worn handle bar grips, but the kick stands are good - remember how we dismounted our bikes?  On the run and let them fall where they may.  Whereas the girls bikes are in pretty good shape but the kickstands are usually pretty loose.  The girls get off properly and stand the bike like it was designed.  Probably the same with cars or the side of the car in which each sex spent the most time.

 

Ed

 

* Just joking of course. ;) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

                   OK everybody with a 64......it's time to man up!  When you get home tonight after you have finished voting, you need to head out to the garage and yank off that door skin......Ed needs info for his survey!  It will seem less painful if you grab a Bud on the way out to the garage!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

Ed

 

* Just joking of course. ;)

Winston is a bigger joker than I am.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well this becomes interesting.  Yes, you have a 3rd week of December build date.  Yes you have windows that are pressed into a channel, and yes your doors bolt to the hinge from the door jamb.  My 03C built '64 has the same door bolts but has the bolt on window glass.  Perhaps a mid year production change.   Too bad those curved adjustment arms are not interchangeable side for side. 

 

Now, I want everyone who owns a '64 to 1) take a picture of the data plate, and 2) pull a door skin and take a picture of the way the window is fastened to the regulator.*

 

 

Does anyone have a collection of service bulletins that may address this?

 

You noticed that my earlier post #22, that I said most of the time it was only the driver's side that was broken - I see that your passenger's side is still intact.  We manly men and our determination to get that door shut tight - grab the top of the window and give it a hard fling.  The more gentile sex doesn't tear things up like we guys do so their stuff survives.  I have a few older bicycles - nine in fact, the earliest is a 1935 Elgin, and the newest is am '84 Schwinn - both boys and girls bikes.  The boys bikes I find are usually wrecks - dented fenders, broken spokes, bent pedals, scuffed seats, worn handle bar grips, but the kick stands are good - remember how we dismounted our bikes?  On the run and let them fall where they may.  Whereas the girls bikes are in pretty good shape but the kickstands are usually pretty loose.  The girls get off properly and stand the bike like it was designed.  Probably the same with cars or the side of the car in which each sex spent the most time.

 

Ed

 

* Just joking of course. ;)

Ed,

  Early `64`s have the `63 style arrangement. The arm breaks because the pivot point seizes. This happens most often in the driver`s door for the same reason everything in the driver`s door breaks more often than the passenger door, more duty cycles.

  Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed,

  Early `64`s have the `63 style arrangement. The arm breaks because the pivot point seizes. This happens most often in the driver`s door for the same reason everything in the driver`s door breaks more often than the passenger door, more duty cycles.

  Tom

Thanks Tom,

 

Between this 12C car and my 3C car we've narrowed down the dates of the change.  Can anyone give us info on cars built between these dates and how your windows are fastened to the regulator?

 

I would think that the more that something is used the less chance there would be for it to seize.  In your experience, have you figured out a solution for replacing/fixing this arm?

 

Ed

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Tom,

 

Between this 12C car and my 3C car we've narrowed down the dates of the change.  Can anyone give us info on cars built between these dates and how your windows are fastened to the regulator?

 

I would think that the more that something is used the less chance there would be for it to seize.  In your experience, have you figured out a solution for replacing/fixing this arm?

 

Ed

I have the VIN number transition but will have to look it up...use causes any lubricant to be consumed or dissipate, a 50 year old car experiences extended periods of inactivity, eventually the arm breaks when used. I have disassembled these and found the pivots in tact but completely frozen requiring much attention to free them up. I have a stash of in tact pivots to be used when I rebuild a door.

  Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 The gauge lens on both the speedo and idiots lights are cracked in various places around the edges. I have no idea what caused this and haven't seen it on another car. I'll have to try and find some replacements as I want it to look as perfect as possible. I've got a large quantity of parts that all either need re-plating, repainting or replacement. It will be nice to one day actually fix something...

 

i've got a couple of lenses here in perth you can have. they're not mint but they're pretty good. if they're better than yours then you are welcome to them.

post-154052-0-24455900-1456930214_thumb.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Norm,
 

You are a legend, thank you. They look a lot better than mine - I can't see any cracks for starters. Apart from being cracked all over the place mine have a lot of tiny scratches but once I cleaned them they look pretty clear to see through to the gauge. So as long as they're not cracked, tiny marks or scratches are okay by me. I'll send you a PM. Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ed,

Would I be right in saying this was made the 3rd week of December 1964? In which case I take back what I said about it being an early build.

Mozzie,

Just to make things a bit clearer, a 12C build date would be the third week in December 1963, not 1964.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Darren - that would make sense. I'm guessing they call it a 64 model but actually release it late the year before.

Anyway, I've progressed some more with the dismantling.  I removed most of the firewall components. The heater, AC, park brake, steering column etc. The front panels and radiator are also off. I had a problem getting the transmission lines disconnected. The nut would not turn on the line so as I undid it the line twisted. In hindsight I should have applied some heat or something (I used WD40 to no avail).. I've found places that make stainless lines for a 65' model which I would have thought were the same but you never know with these cars. Otherwise I'll have to get some made but I'd prefer to buy off the shelf as they will have the most accurate bends in them. 

I originally planned on not replacing the heater core or blower but now that I've seen how hard it is to remove this stuff I think it's wise to just replace as much as possible. The firewall insulation also came apart so if I replace that I don't want to have to pull the heater ducting off it again at a later date. The grommet for the AC lines does not seem to have a replacement so I guess I'll have to reuse it. There is also a rubber seal around the opening for the duct that connects to the blower assembly on the firewall - this is not much good but once again, I see no replacement. One of the problems with having a car blasted and rebuilt from scratch is you have to remove absolutely everything so some parts that no one ever removes end up coming off. In the end it will be a nice build but I'm being very careful to document everything. Anyone can just pull a car apart but as I can't remember what I did yesterday I don't trust myself to remember in a years time how this thing goes together. I bought a label maker and seal-able bags. Everything I take off I photograph and label. Usually I show the screws next to their holes then put them all in a bag. I also number each stage so I can reference the photos back to the parts. Very nerdy I know - but I'll thank myself in future.

One thing I was extra careful of was the vacuum lines. I labeled the colors on the heater controls and pulled out the whole bundle through the hole in the firewall. I'm planning to replace them with new ones (someone had a link in another post for Ames Performance - GM seems to use the same color coded tube on everything). One thing I noticed is the hose that goes from the vacuum reservoir was quite loose and did not seem like the right size. When I unplugged it the hose just fell on the floor - it didn't seem to be connected to anything! The fitting on the manifold for vacuum has been blocked off. Am I right in assuming this is where the line from the vacuum reservoir goes? There was obviously a problem on this car (or many) and the system was disconnected and the belts for the AC removed and replaced with non AC belts. I'm just assuming that everything has had it because I don't want to put it all back together all nicely painted and find things don't work. 

p.s. I notice all my previous pictures are not visible - I hope it's something that's only temporary with the new webpage update. Not much point in having a build blog otherwise.Facebook2.thumb.jpg.50f1ec0edd923fdc60b3Facebook6.thumb.jpg.24a2ba951a979cc8cf24

  • 15-climate06.thumb.jpg.35b7fe9dee7317a4c15-climate05.thumb.jpg.127264509a0801fc1Facebook5.thumb.jpg.ac3cb35f3633319fd17415-climate03.thumb.jpg.fb0626a33d359a64f15-climate04.thumb.jpg.35f304bf05cc245eb15-climate07.thumb.jpg.16c913b1dd346735a

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been a while since I posted any progress. I've pretty much stripped the body completely now and fortunately didn't find anything else bad. Everything is photographed, bagged and tagged except for the obvious stuff. I've also ordered about 6.5k USD worth of parts which is going in a container next week for delivery to Australia. It's an expensive process getting it all here and I decided to do it in two lots. The next shipment will include all interior and any remaining small stuff to finish it off. This order was for all air con, heating, suspension, front end, rubbers, muffler and various other parts to finish the rolling chassis.

Todays job was to finally get the body off the chassis and onto the rotisserie. Being a full chassis this is tricky as the front rotisserie mount needs to go where the engine is. In the end I bought a gantry crane to lift the front up and half the rotisserie to lift the rear. I jacked up the back under the diff, put axle stands with wooden blocks next to the chassis mounts and then lowered the chassis down leaving the body with enough room to fit the rear brackets. I took the rear wheels off for this part to get a bit more room. The front half I lifted with the gantry and put some wood packers under the sills to distribute the load a bit more evenly. The rotisserie in the fully extended position gave only about an inch clearance from the rear suspension to the floor to roll the chassis out of the way - lucky. I used the trusty Subaru to pull the chassis out of the way as there were only two of us for this job. Then we mounted the rest of the rotisserie in place. I haven't tried rotating it yet but it will probably need a little extra adjustment. It all went quite smoothly with no damage to anything. The brackets for the rotisserie were modified with angle welded on to use the chassis mounts. Obviously the rear suspension chassis mount position is not supported with this set up but I'm thinking I might put some stands with lengths of wood at those points so when I'm not working on it the body is fully supported as it would be on the chassis.

Next part is to restore/paint the chassis and everything on it. A job made much easier without the body in the way. The body will be going off to get blasted and will be primed in epoxy with the underside fully painted before it goes back on the chassis. After that I'll do some more work before it goes for the rest of the body and paint. 

Rotisserie02.jpg

Rotisserie03.jpg

Rotisserie04.jpg

Rotisserie05.jpg

Rotisserie06.jpg

Rotisserie07.jpg

Rotisserie08.jpg

Rotisserie09.jpg

Rotisserie10.jpg

Rotisserie11.jpg

Rotisserie12.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now