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46 woodie

Chrome removal

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Totally unrelated to antique cars, but can anyone suggest a method for chrome removal. I purchased a bunch of old coins and in the box was a 1896 silver dollar that someone used on a pendant or belt buckle and had it chrome plated. It's worth about $30, not rare  but worthless like it is. Someone suggested Easy Off oven cleaner?

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Soak it first in a strong solution of oxalic acid then in a dilute hydrochloric acid ( muriatic acid ) solution..........Bob

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Easy Off won't touch it. You use it to clean chrome oven grates. You'll probably spend more than 30 bucks to have it stripped

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I was advised by our chrome plater that muriatic acid will remove chrome. Available at most hardware stores.;

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The chrome plating is easily removed, it is the nickle underneath that presents the problem.  Reverse plating is done electrically.

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If you are a coin collector, you probably know that once the original patina is removed the value of the coin is dramatically reduced.  

A friend and I collected coins when we were kids. He got the idea to polish his pennies with Wrights silver polish; 1909 .S VDB  and all. Gross error !

Your silver dollar is probably worth scrap silver price. 

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If you are a coin collector, you probably know that once the original patina is removed the value of the coin is dramatically reduced...  

Your silver dollar is probably worth scrap silver price. 

 

Curti is right:  Even with the chrome removed, your

coin will not look original, and it will totally uncollectible,

NOT worth $30.  It will, however, be worth its silver melt value--

probably even WITH the chrome plating on it.

 

I wouldn't spend even a moment's more thought on

the coin.  Hundreds of millions of silver dollars

were made, and there are still millions around.

The huge production numbers--far more than were

needed at the time--were due to the political influence

of the silver-mining interests in the 1800's, to create

a "demand" for their product.  Many, many silver dollars

were stored in bank and government vaults for decades,

even being released in uncirculated condition in the 1960's.

Thus, there are still huge numbers even in new condition.

 

Your time has a value, and rather than spending time

on that defaced example, you could buy as many other

silver dollars as you wish--even hundreds at a time.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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Thanks for all your suggestions. Of course I know never to clean or polish coins. I got this coin in a box that I purchased at a garage sale and I just hate it when anybody does stuff like this. There were dozens of coins and the first 4 I looked at were worth more than the seller was asking, so I purchased the box. I was hoping a professional chrome shop could remove the chrome without altering the finish and a couple said they could, but the cost of removal was twice what the coin is worth. Oh well!

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Right now it it worth $11.44 in melt,  I doubt that you can get it stripped from $18.56.  Most any gold and silver buyer will give you melt for it.  I have traded gold and silver for years and unless it is rare, melt is all I pay and most everyone else does the same

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Thanks Dick, yes, the quotes that I have received from chrome shops are between $50 and $60 to remove the chrome. Not worth the price of the silver dollar, the sad part is that it was in very nice condition to start with. Only the face is plated and the reverse is what I would grade as MS-60. I have a couple hundred silver dollars in my collection and a couple have condition issues that I would have gladly given to who ever plated it, rather than this coin.

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The hardest part about stripping it is attaching a copper wire to the coin without drilling a hole.  The actual stripping is less than $5 

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 I got this coin in a box that I purchased at a garage sale and I just hate it when anybody does stuff like this..... 

 

Since the coin is already defaced, why not 

use it once again as jewelry?  Maybe attach

a pin to the back of it and your wife can wear it,

if she likes such things.

 

Or give it to a child, to whom it may be a treasure!

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I thought you just dipped them in mercury and they were all nice and shiny again. My science teacher showed me..... in 1964.

Bernie

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