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kevin_h

Advice on scratch repair

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Hi anyone - looking for some general wisdom on repairing a few minor chips and scratches on a classic sports car. The paint is original and looks fabulous so I'd prefer to preserve it with minimal respraying. However, I haven't really found any shop or micro repair technique that has any better answer than respraying the general area. Color matching is playing into the repair -- the shops want to spray within logical/perceptual or geometric borders which of course broaden the respray area well beyond the actual defect.

 

Should I keep searching for some miracle micro repair solution or just get over it and trust a reputable shop to do their thing?

 

thanks in advance!

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50 years of trying has convinced me there is no "miracle micro repair". It will always look like a micro repair to you, even if others don't see it (at first). Because you can never get a perfect color match better shops insist on spraying to geometric or perceptual borders. Reputable shops got their reputation by turning out only quality work - trust their judgement.

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 If it is a really ugly scratch, you can spray a few coats in the smallest area possible and then remove the paint on the surface with block sanding or buffing. (but only if you are good at it)

 

 Small chips may also be filled with paint applied by dobbing with a paper match stick, being careful to not go onto the surface of existing paint

 

This will fill the scratch and might not be noticeable on a dark and stormy night!

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Perfect answers guys, thanks so much. I think I will probably let go and trust the shop with my baby, damn hard as it will be!

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We just finished repairs on an antique car that had been involved in a minor accident. As often happens with really old cars the paint had been touched up before to the point where the front and rear of the car were two slightly different shades of the same color, requiring us to buy two pints of slightly different colors and blending front to back. The result is unnoticeable but we ended up repainting about 25% of the car.

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When going to school I worked at a body shop in the summer. When a request like yours came in, the painter would say " it ain't a going happen, take it somewhere else, cause no madder whut I do you ain't a going to be happy " ! Wayne

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I worked in a shop that built ambulances. One of my jobs was to touch up nicks and scratches in the fibreglass interior panels caused by careless installation. I got good at building up gel coat by touching up with a paper match then sanding down with 600 wet or dry to a flat surface, and polishing. I made some fairly gruesome flaws disappear.

 

A patient person can do this, if you can get paint that matches yours perfectly. If you have to pay someone $85 an hour to build up coats of  paint drop by drop, then sand it down with a sanding block the size of an emery board, and hand polish with a fingertip you will have an eye popping bill if you figure it out as so much per square inch. But it is possible to do it yourself if you are patient. Start with the least noticeable scratches, down on the rocker panels or on the lower back fenders and work your way up.

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 I will add that if the paint is not in very good condition you can clean, polish and wax and it will look pretty good from 20 or 30 feet away.  Even the most beautiful woman must get wrinkles and crows feet in time.

 

You could look up some videos about detailing old cars. There are some real magicians out there when it comes to restoring and preserving old paint.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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I agree with what Roger says about touching it up. If the car is really original then someone, in the future, will thank you for saving the paint as it was applied by the factory. If however you are a real perfectionist, and you do have a blend done, it will probably only be a matter of time before the car comes apart for a complete paint job. There are no short cuts to perfection! Many years ago I turned the corner away from needing everything perfect, and have been much happier loving them for what they are, and marveling at how they have survived.

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Solidly in the Capri camp. But love knows no price - '86 Toyota Celica Supra (MkII) in deep red. Not even sort of a classic classic but maybe gaining appreciation among 80's kids at least? It's a looker in any case and I've been told to hang on to it - no, not just by the voices in my head.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1vekj7mtkzd38r9/IMG_0261.jpg?dl=0

 

Not sure what my goal is here but I lean more toward the 'authentic' philosophy.

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For late model cars you can buy little bottles of paint with built in brushes at auto parts stores. Matched to your factory color formula. I use them on my daily driver to touch up stone chips, they work well and the paint is durable.

 

Carefully touch up, wet sand, then buff and polish and those minor flaws will disappear.

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