nick8086

What do you think is the rarest regular production car you've ever seen?

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And in the middle was the Nash-Healy. I have seen the second design and is striking but have never seen the first design except in pictures.

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Reading through the post's I noticed there seems to be different interpretations of what is a "production car". I also think there is a difference between pre-war rare, post war rare and used car rare.

Myself I would have to say would be the 1923 Copper Cooled Chevrolet, only two are known to exist, I saw the one at Greenfield Village.The other survivor is in a museum in Nevada. From what I understand It was a good idea just with poor execution, supposedly they were all destroyed by GM. I am sure the ultimate intention was for aircraft use. 

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I didn't read all 4 pages of replies so someone may have already mentioned the '60 Edsel convertible of which only 76 were built....

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I didn't read all 4 pages of replies so someone may have already mentioned the '60 Edsel convertible of which only 76 were built....

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 Think where we are having a problem is with the definition of a "production car" and where are the boundaries ? For example consider a Hurst SSJ. It was catalogued and sold by Pontiac dealers & 470 were sold between 1970 and 1972 but at the bottom is just a Grand Prix with cosmetic changes. How about a Fordillac or Studillac ? Is being revewed by Tom McCahill enough ? How about the Cunninghams ? YWTK.

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 Think where we are having a problem is with the definition of a "production car" and where are the boundaries ? For example consider a Hurst SSJ. It was catalogued and sold by Pontiac dealers & 470 were sold between 1970 and 1972 but at the bottom is just a Grand Prix with cosmetic changes. How about a Fordillac or Studillac ? Is being revewed by Tom McCahill enough ? How about the Cunninghams ? YWTK.

Just enjoy the post.  This post is really interesting and educational. If not liked, the original OP could always take it down. Amazing only a hand full of people posting. Thought that there would be more traffic.

Edited by countrytravler (see edit history)

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It's perhaps not the rarest, but definitely one of the strangest. 

 

A friend traded in his Austin Mini Cooper for a new 1970 Chevrolet Camaro shortly after they were introduced.  He had to have one.  Looked nice in black, but it had a six cylinder engine and column shift with Powerglide.  The baby moon hubcaps were nice, though.  Often wondered what the value of it was when he sold/traded it.

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My dad bought a new 1957 Oldsmobile Super 88 two door post sedan. That's the rarest of that year and make.

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I have a couple of rare ones. A circa 1955 Buckler Mk. 16. Bucklers are neat little sports/racing cars from the U.K. Think very early Lotus, Elva etc. Google them if you are curious. The Mk. 16 was the 6" longer W.B. version of the Mk. 15.  Mk 15's were Morris Minor engine configuration, entry level club racers although a few were built up for road use. The Mk 16 was the same basic chassis extended by 6 " and set up for MG TD power, or later on MGA power. Unfortunately even the owners assn. doesn't know production numbers for either but I have seen estimates of 25-30 MK 15's. with a decent number of survivors. The club is aware of only my Mk 16 here in Canada and a single other that is in England, production can only be guessed at but I doubt it was more than 10

  My 1912 Staver Chicago. No production numbers survive but the highest numbered survivor is around 2000.  A grand total of 5 survivors as long as you are generous and count my basket case as a car. Mine is the only 1912, and the only model 40 thought to exist today.

  Up the street from me a fellow car enthusiast has a 1967 TVR Tuscan , factory 289 Ford.  Built long after Jack Griffith ceased involvement with TVR. 1 of 24 produced, so quite a bit rarer than either a Griffith 200 or 400.

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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Was part of the appeal of my new toy, a 1993 Pontiac Grand Prix GTP. CompNine reported 39,860 GT (GTP was an option) coupes built. Of the 39,860, 47 had five speed manual transmissions (rest were automagics). This was the last year a manual transmission was available in a Grand Prix. This one also has a DOHC 6, 4 wheel disk brakes with ABS, FE3 suspension, and AC. Click on .sig for details.

So this beats my 78 Sunbird (V8/4 speed, 66 built) and 70 Grand Prix (400cid, 4 speed Muncie, 329 built).

In 1970 I looked into a Monte Carle but the 4 speed was only available with the small block.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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Not the rarest, but bet very few of you have ever seen one.

1968 Cougar GT-E 427 side oiler. Less than 500 made, and some of the 500 didn't have the 427 side oiler.

I bought a black cherry new, site unseen, the last one I saw at an auction sold for $182,000.00

$5,200.00 which was high for a 1968 model.

NO I don't still own it.

Dale in Indy

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Re: Studillac and Cunningham. Briggs Cunningham ran 2 Cadillacs at LeMans in 1950. He wanted to run Fordillacs the next year but was not permitted to, as they were not considered a production car under the rules. So he started building his own Cunningham sports cars which were allowed to race. Since the Studillac was the successor to the Fordillac, built in the same shop by the same people I think that answers your question.

 

In any case a Studillac, Fordillac or Cunningham would be considered a rare car at least by me.

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Lots of Studillac's and especially Fordillac's were built by independent builders. There may have been a particular shop{ Frick, Tappett ,Momo, Cunningham } that is considered the origion  of the concept, but there were many who copied and even improved on the concept.

 Cunningham on the other hand is considered a unique make. Others may have built sports racing specials along the lines of Cunningham produced cars, but no one then or now conciders them Cunningham's.

 A Fordillac or a Studillac  is considered such regardless of who built it. Sure the most desirable have a Frick/ Cunningham history, but they are after all just a Ford/Stude car with a Cadillac engine. And many were built without any connection with Frick, Tappett , Momo or Cunningham.

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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It is the same body shell and interior as the 1966 American Grand Prix, grill's, bumpers tail lights, all the same. It has a different roof and rear window  than a regular Pontiac Catalina, Bonneville or Parisienne.

 I have been asked to bring it to a POCI meet by a member and if there is one close enough to me I will someday, maybe. The conversations and arguments can be entertaining or ridiculous, depending on the persons involved.

  So far I've resisted the temptation other than a cruise- in at the Steve Plunkett Estate where the Fleetwood Country Cruise is held and it got some arguments going there!

The also put 327s, 348-409s in the Pontiacs.

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Edited by countrytravler (see edit history)

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Not the rarest, but bet very few of you have ever seen one.

1968 Cougar GT-E 427 side oiler. Less than 500 made, and some of the 500 didn't have the 427 side oiler.

I bought a black cherry new, site unseen, the last one I saw at an auction sold for $182,000.00

$5,200.00 which was high for a 1968 model.

NO I don't still own it.

Dale in Indy

My friends 68 Cougar XR7-G Sunroof-427-4 speed.

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The also put 327s, 348-409s in the Pontiacs.

These photos of the 61 Pontiac were taken at the 348-409 convention, Great Bent, Ka, Sept of 2014. Were you present?

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These photos of the 61 Pontiac were taken at the 348-409 convention, Great Bent, Ka, Sept of 2014. Were you present?

Wished I was. I have a lot of 409 friends that keep me posted on the 490 events. I have built about 20 09 cars and I did the clone of Profitts car in 1980 but I put a Z11 in it at the time. Here is the 409 meet at the Great Lakes Dragway in 1980-81.I was a member of the Mid-West 409 club at the time. The 63 pictured is me running a 409 with small heads on a 2 barrel back in the mid 80s

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I am fortunate to own two fairly rare production Pierce-Arrows:  a 1930 Model B roadster (134-inch wheelbase, highest body number known = 106, total differently numbered roadsters listed with Pierce-Arrow Society since 1957 = 6), and a 1934 Pierce-Arrow model 840A (8-cyl, 12-cyl is 1240A) Silver Arrow coupe (highest 1934 body number known for both 8s and 12s is 43, at least 5 of these -- by known-to-PAS body number -- were built for 1935, and four are known to have survived into this century).  Pierce-Arrow production records were fed to the furnace when the company was liquidated in May 1938.

 

The SA coupe is on a 144-inch wheelbase otherwise used only for 7-p sedans and limousines.  The "production" SAs of 1934-35 used conventional P-A front clips and modified (widened) rear fenders.  The very famous 1933 SA concept/halo cars (5 built, 3 survive) shared no sheet metal with any production Pierce.  The SA coupe was available with or without sidemounted spare wheels; I think the lack of sidemounts shows the wonderful lines much better.

 

Both are regularly toured and driven, 9.000 miles on the roadster since its 2002 acquisition and 12,000 miles on the SA since its 2006 acquisition. 

 

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