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kenbenn

steering wheel restoration

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Hi   I plan to refurbish my baketite steering  wheel from 1935 Hupmobile. I will fill, sand and paint to match , and coats of clear .

Anyone done tis ? and any advise.

 

Thanks Ken.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I've done it many times.  What I do may help, then others may have other ideas.

#1 I remove the steering wheel and inspect it.

#2 Thoroughly clean the entire wheel then wash with pep-sol (Like lacquer thinner or other cleaner solvent.

#3 Find all cracks, divots and imperfections and repair them.  I cut the cracks to a V, then fill them with a filler requiring a hardener.

#4 Shape, sand and prime to perfection.

#5 Paint with acrylic enamel with a hardener.  I always have black steering wheels and use a gloss black with a flattening agent to 

     give it the Bakelite look.

Very durable and lasts almost forever like Bakelite

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All as Paul said.  Clean, file out the cracks and fill with epoxy.  JB Weld is very good for this as it does not shrink and is easy to sand. 

 

I use epoxy primer and 2 pack paint to finish off.

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Thanks for the advice guys. that's sounds great I shall proceed down those lines

thanks Ken.

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I use a marine epoxy called "Aquqmend" .

It is like a clay and can be worked in and formed with your fingers. It also sands to a nice feathered edge ( it is not as messy as JB Weld) .

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Hi   I plan to refurbish my baketite steering  wheel from 1935 Hupmobile. I will fill, sand and paint to match , and coats of clear .

Anyone done tis ? and any advise.

 

Thanks Ken.

Be careful Ken..Some people rather fix a steering wheel on the car...A real pain, no doubt..but many have encountered real big problems trying to remove a steering wheel.. Remember.. these are old cars..many components are rusted solid together and to try to remove they could break many things. I have a 1933 ford, and try to do as little disassemble as possible unless I really have too.

Edited by FrankWest107 (see edit history)
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I find it almost impossible to get good paint coverage on a steering wheel that's still in the car.  May look good to the driver, but not through the windshield or from below.  Better to do it completely the first time.  I did my 34 Ford Tudor and no more black hands.  It

was done in the mid 70's and still was nice when I sold it in 1998.  I'd bet that it's still nice today.  I figure it lasted 40 years the first

time and materials were better when I did it, so maybe with less use, it's still good.  (Who knows, maybe the guy who bought it made

a street rod out of it.!)

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Thanks everyone.    I will look up aquqmend  might be available in Australia.

                                 Frank. Well I have already been down that road. I was determined to get the steering wheel of without damaging it

                                 copious amount of spraying tapping etc. even made up a puller. ended up taking box,  column and wheel of together, to work on the bench.

                                 Long story short wheel was not coming of .it defeated me, until I recruited the 5" grinder. I had another wheel which was in better condition,

                                 which is the one I will refurbish.

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Steering wheels can be a real problem to remove.. There are special pullers that work much better than others. In other words..It is a real problem to pull a steering wheel off an antique car. Be very careful.

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