Nellie519

1964 Impala Super Sport 327 250 HP

Recommended Posts

This was in a Morton Building for 39 years.  It is running but has all of the chrome, seats are in good shape and interior is nice. Power top is original with small tear.  It is mine now given to me by an elderly gentleman. 90,000 miles  Don't know what do with it.  Restore or sell.  What would it be worth?

 

Title is clean.  Body is solid except front fenders need work.

 

I also have 12 SS wheel covers and don't know what value they have.  Any comments would be helpful

post-154843-0-86908700-1443105550_thumb.

post-154843-0-58258100-1443105569_thumb.

post-154843-0-38890600-1443105587_thumb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The car looks definitely restorable.

 

I would recommend restoring it, but it's your personal choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that if you check the Old Cars Price Guide or the NADA website for "Classic" car prices, you'll discover that it's definitely cost effective for an OEM-level restoration.  Not one of those super-slick paint restorations, just use modern paint to re-do it to OEM levels of niceness, which should be obtainable.

 

Although the car has been inside, ALL rubber items will probably need to be replaced . . . INCLUDING all of the fuel lines and fuel pump, plus suspension bushings.  Interiors should be available from vendors already done and ready for installation over new foam padding.

 

Plan on a new convertible top, too, somewhere along the road.  Just as with the tire cords and seat upholstery, "dry rot" happens.  That top might look good, but is really pretty fragile at this time.  Probably need to look at the hydraulics of the top, too, as a maintenance issue for a vehicle of that age.

 

It might not have the 300 horsepower 327, but the 250 horsepower 327 is a pretty nice running vehicle.  PLUS, there are probably some Chevy enthusiasts that start drooling when the words "Impala" and "SS" are used together, even for the earlier versions.  So, even if it might take a few years to get it all up and going, it's going to be a good investment AND a car you can enjoy driving in modern traffic with very good dependability and comfort.

 

Just yesterday, by chance, I saw an older gentleman driving a white '61 Impala convertible on the sunny day we had in Fort Worth.  White, blue interior, white walls, wheel covers, and twin rear-slant antennas.  The top was down.  He had on his sun glasses ... AND he was smiling as he drove down the street.  It was a restored vehicle, probably pretty recently.  It just looked great!  And I smiled too!

 

NTX5467

Edited by NTX5467 (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 327/300 HP engine should have a Carter AFB, instead of the Rochester 4GC. Of course, the intake is different but it also has larger runners?  The intake valves are bigger, 1.94?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that if you check the Old Cars Price Guide or the NADA website for "Classic" car prices, you'll discover that it's definitely cost effective for an OEM-level restoration.  Not one of those super-slick paint restorations, just use modern paint to re-do it to OEM levels of niceness, which should be obtainable.

 

Although the car has been inside, ALL rubber items will probably need to be replaced . . . INCLUDING all of the fuel lines and fuel pump, plus suspension bushings.  Interiors should be available from vendors already done and ready for installation over new foam padding.

 

Plan on a new convertible top, too, somewhere along the road.  Just as with the tire cords and seat upholstery, "dry rot" happens.  That top might look good, but is really pretty fragile at this time.  Probably need to look at the hydraulics of the top, too, as a maintenance issue for a vehicle of that age.

 

It might not have the 300 horsepower 327, but the 250 horsepower 327 is a pretty nice running vehicle.  PLUS, there are probably some Chevy enthusiasts that start drooling when the words "Impala" and "SS" are used together, even for the earlier versions.  So, even if it might take a few years to get it all up and going, it's going to be a good investment AND a car you can enjoy driving in modern traffic with very good dependability and comfort.

 

Just yesterday, by chance, I saw an older gentleman driving a white '61 Impala convertible on the sunny day we had in Fort Worth.  White, blue interior, white walls, wheel covers, and twin rear-slant antennas.  The top was down.  He had on his sun glasses ... AND he was smiling as he drove down the street.  It was a restored vehicle, probably pretty recently.  It just looked great!  And I smiled too!

 

NTX5467

thank you for the information.  still looking at options.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be a pretty comprehensive restoration job, but a sweet car if you go that route. I've had to pull the trigger on a few potential project cars in the past and commission them to the bone yard.. sometimes better tahn losing money. Just have to play it smart! 

 

Id recommend checking out some local junk yards before making a final decision. Obviously KBB the shit out of it too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now