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PA Year-of-Manufacture Plates on Non-authentic vehicles

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A few years ago, Pennsylvania passed legislation to permit the use of YOM plates on antique vehicles.  After several years of failed legislation, this was exciting news to owners of authentic antiques.  It just completes the package.  It is gaining in popularity, as more YOM plates are being registered.  I have noticed many, if not 1/2 of them on non-authentic modified vehicles.  Here's a few examples: '41 Willys Gasser, a fenderless Ford Model A sedan with DUB wheels and rubberband tires, a '50's GM Aerosedan that was so chopped, sectioned, and customized, it's origin was almost unrecognizable, and of course the ever-popular Rat Rod.  None of these vehicles looked like that in their YOM, but proudly displayed the YOM plate.  Kind of misses the point.

 

The YOM process in PA involves first applying for Antique Vehicle registration, then upon approval of your chosen YOM plate and a large additional fee, you can display the vintage plate.  A photo of said vehicle is no longer required.  Therein lies the loophole.

 

I know several states have this option for owners of antique vehicles.   What do you see in your state?

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It's the same situation here in KY.  YOM/Antique plates are often put on vehicles that don't even have value and have questionable roadworthiness.  There is a 1984-85ish S-10 truck around here (in KY 25 years old is the mark for those plates) that is worth whatever scrap is going for in it's current condition, yet they have those plates.  It is completely rusted out and appears to have no exhaust and little to no lights that work.  I've never been a fan of inspections, but those vehicles make me think otherwise.

 

I don't mind it so much on modified vehicles that are actually safe to operate, but too often people use it as simply a way to avoid future taxes (in KY it's a one time fee to get them, then you're set for the life of the vehicle) on a vehicle that should not even be on the road.

 

Here you just take your 25 year or older vehicle tax bill in when it is due and say you want to change to antique/YOM plates.  You pay your normal tax bill and $3 for a new plate, and that's it.  You can display YOM plates if you want instead of the antique plate they give you, but you need to make sure you keep the antique plate somewhere in the car if you are stopped for any reason.  You never pay taxes again, just a minimal registration fee (under $20) every year.  They don't need to see the vehicle at all.  It could be a $100 car or a $1,000,000 car.

Edited by 39BuickEight (see edit history)

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I see very few year-of-manufacture plates being used

in Pennsylvania, and I'm in the heart of antique-car

territory.  The state's high fees, I think, have dampened

demand.

 

Since Pennsylvania has only a single license plate,

people overwhelmingly put their historic plates on the front

as a display, while keeping the standard-issue (official)

antique plates on the rear.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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NC has allowed YOM plates for years without registering the YOM plate. Instead you have to carry a current tag with you and show it if stopped.

Have not seen any rat rods with YOM tags, but I suupose there is nothing to stop it.

YOM tags sell well at Autofair.

Edited by Phillip Cole (see edit history)

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This argument has been discussed before.

If a police officer runs a number and it comes back as a 1932 Ford, but the car is fiberglass and has a GM engine is it really a 1932 Ford?

The answer is yes, it looks like one. If the cop ran a plate number and it come back as a 2015 replica it doesn't meet any description.

So if it looks like a duck it should be considered a duck.

So as for YOM plates the same rule applies. In Oregon I am thinking that if you have a fiberglass Ford with a GM engine you can use YOM plates. (I have seen them) Technically you can only drive it to shows and parades but nobody that I know follows that rule very closely. 

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In Oklahoma a YOM plate is registered as a specialty or vanity plate, $25 fee. Only one set of numbers may be registered as a YOM. For example, I have registered a 1952 tag number 19-1200. No other person may register a YOM numbered 19-1200. A current regular plate has to be carried in the car at all times.

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This is the same problem with historical plates. So many modified cars about with these plates will eventually make the authorities do something about it. Then what will happen is they will take the whole thing away. I know why so many of these modified cars have those plates.....to exempt themselves from emission testing because they have thrown away all the emission related equipment. My state has smog check back to 1967 and Federal law on cars with exhaust emission devises says it's illegal to remove any of it even if it's exempt from being tested or inspected. Many states like California also back that up.

I'm sure at a AACA event that a car that shows up with these emission devises missing that there will be points deduction or disqualification from showing.

Tell me, what historical significance does a modified car have, other than a race car? NONE !

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Minnesota is the same way but hot rodded cars normally carry "Street Rod" plates.  Maybe it is cooler to have "Street Rod" plates but I rarely see rodded cars with YOM plates.  It seems to me the "original" car guys care a lot more about having YOM plates.  My 1928 and my 1929 cars carry my wife's Great Grandfathers license plates, had to dig them out of the grainery.

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It's worse than that here in California. Everyone is familiar with the iconic black plates from the 60's. Well, now that the DMV has finally agreed to the use of YOM plates, I have seen several cars from the 90's and 2000's with their current issue, seven digit plates painted black and yellow! I can't believe they don't get hammered for this by every cop that spots them.  :wacko: 

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I have an idea.... Why not let the police and the DMV in each respective state handle the problem.  Why does it bother some to see YOM plates on a 'used' car???

 

Frank

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Pa must have softened in the last 30 years on antique plates. When I applied for mine in '84 I had to jump through hoops! Had to get the serial number validated , had to send in about 20 photos of the car and wait about 6 weeks! By the way, it's technically illegal to mount any plate, vanity, license or decorative on the front of cars in PA but I don't think that the police pay any attention to it. It's one of those things everybody does.

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I have an idea.... Why not let the police and the DMV in each respective state handle the problem.  Why does it bother some to see YOM plates on a 'used' car???

 

Frank

I agree with Frank. If you were born in 1952 why not 1952 plates on your car no matter what the year! Wayne

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In Minnesota they do care, my friend was driving his 1940 Ford 2 TON cab over truck he has collector plates (YOM) on it.  He thought it would be fun to haul some grain for the neighbors.  You can not use collector plates for "utilitarian purposes" in MN.  He got a $150 fine and had to buy standard truck plates.

 

I like the "utilitarian purposes" idea, keeps you from driving to work, and the hardware store...but can you go to get gas?  seems pretty utilitarian...

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In Minnesota they do care, my friend was driving his 1940 Ford 2 TON cab over truck he has collector plates (YOM) on it.  He thought it would be fun to haul some grain for the neighbors.  You can not use collector plates for "utilitarian purposes" in MN.  He got a $150 fine and had to buy standard truck plates.

 

I like the "utilitarian purposes" idea, keeps you from driving to work, and the hardware store...but can you go to get gas?  seems pretty utilitarian...

 

This is the norm in most states that have YOM or antique plates.  Naturally, you often hear stories of authorities taking this to excessive levels.  Here in VA, there are stories of police stopping pickup trucks with antique plates on their way to a car show with a cooler and lawn chairs in the bed and writing them up for using their "antique" vehicle for "hauling cargo"...  :rolleyes:

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In Minnesota they do care, my friend was driving his 1940 Ford 2 TON cab over truck he has collector plates (YOM) on it.  He thought it would be fun to haul some grain for the neighbors.  You can not use collector plates for "utilitarian purposes" in MN.  He got a $150 fine and had to buy standard truck plates.

 

I like the "utilitarian purposes" idea, keeps you from driving to work, and the hardware store...but can you go to get gas?  seems pretty utilitarian...

r

With all due respect what does it hurt driving to the hardware store or to work? It's his car let him do what he wants. Wayne

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I hear you, I have taken mine to work and the hardware store, but not very often. 

 

My MN collector plates are $20 for lifetime, per car, they must be piggybacked with one normally registered MN vehicle.  I always have the option to buy regular plates and drive it anytime I want. 

 

I am good with the rules, I have 8 collector cars, license cost $160 lifetime.

 

The part I like best about the collector plates is the cars are registered to me.  In MN any unlicensed vehicle drops off the books in two years.

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r

With all due respect what does it hurt driving to the hardware store or to work? It's his car let him do what he wants. Wayne

 

Here in VA, it matters because the antique plates exempt the vehicle from annual safety inspections. This is why the DMV doesn't allow these vehicles to be used for daily driver purposes.  Also (and likely the real reason) is because of the significant reduction in registration fees.

 

By the way, in VA there is a little known provision in the YOM plate law that does allow you to use them on a daily driver, so long as you get annual inspections and pay the annual registration fee.

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Iowa is interesting, If you vehicle is more than 25 years old you can bolt on YOM plates and throw the modern state issued ones under the seat. No registration of YOM plates required! And absolutely no record of your vehicle with that YOM plate number anywhere! I've never been pulled over for them on my 1930 or 1940. I get pulled over once a month in my 1986, I have a copy of the vehicle code in the glove box and present it to the officer, I actually have several copies because they normally crumple it up and throw it back at me.

Edited by Plyroadking (see edit history)

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I have an idea.... Why not let the police and the DMV in each respective state handle the problem.  Why does it bother some to see YOM plates on a 'used' car???

 

Frank

Great point Frank, I don't have time to bother looking at "Antique" Connecticut plates on 25 year old used cars the house painters drive around here. Bob 

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We in the state of Washington have had YOM for many years, I know of no heavy handed interference by any police agency. I think that problems of misuse of your collector car would be of more interest to your insurance company.

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In Michigan you can apply for a Historical Plate or Authentic Plate (YOM). They both carry the same restriction. To qualify, you vehicle has to be at least 26 years old, owned solely as a collectors item and can only be driven to historic club activites, car shows, parades, etc. except in August where it can be driven anywhere in the state w/o restrictions. We have a car show in every other town all summer so you can drive often without getting harassed.

For the YOM plates they have to match the historic vehicle's model year (which is subject to interpretation with some cars). The plates cost $35 to register and are good until you sell, scrap or modify the car. Not sure the definition of modify.

The plate has to be the original color and cannot be a repro. You photograph the plate and send that with copy of title, proof of insurance, $$,and simple application to the Secretary of State.

We do not have a state inspection or emission certification in Michigan, although we should to get some of the junk driving around with missing sheet metal, bungee corded bumpers pumping out burning oil or black unburned hydrocarbons, etc. off our our roads.

Scott

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Those restrictions are to severe ( Michigan ) ! You can't even pick up the grandkids and take them for ice cream. They take much of the enjoyment out of the hobby. Obviously the law makers don't own an antique or a classic. Wayne

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I agree. If you abide by the letter of the law here it is very restrictive except in August where there are no restrictions. I have never seen anyone get pulled over or ticketed (maybe someone will chime in and prove me wrong) and I think a lot of people do drive to the ice cream store or church or just take a drive without issue. I don't let it stop me from those activities and would argue as to the intent of the law....not that it would get me anywhere.

Scott

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I went to the Michigan Secretary of State website and the verbiage there gives a bit more "wiggle" room vs the actual application form....

"To qualify for an authentic license plate, the vehicle must be:

26 or more years old

Owned solely as a collector's item

A vehicle registered with a regular historic plate or authentic historic plate cannot be used for general transportation. The vehicle can only used for participating in historical club activities, exhibitions, tours, parades, car shows, swap meets, and similar uses."

So me driving to the ice cream store is an exhibition in my mind or maybe one of those similar uses.

Scott

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I went to the Michigan Secretary of State website and the verbiage there gives a bit more "wiggle" room vs the actual application form....

"To qualify for an authentic license plate, the vehicle must be:

26 or more years old

Owned solely as a collector's item

A vehicle registered with a regular historic plate or authentic historic plate cannot be used for general transportation. The vehicle can only used for participating in historical club activities, exhibitions, tours, parades, car shows, swap meets, and similar uses."

So me driving to the ice cream store is an exhibition in my mind or maybe one of those similar uses.

Scott

(bolding mine)

 

That's my belief , too.

Alabama has a similar ordinance.

I was filling the Roadmaster with gas the other day, A lady asked me where the car show was. I replied, "Wherever I decide to drive it"

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