Jump to content

1931 DB brakes all locked up


keiser31
 Share

Recommended Posts

Rolled the '31 DB DH6 out of the garage. Got my new wiring harness mostly done. Went to push the '31 back into the garage for the night and the brakes are all locked up. CRAP! That's what I get for letting it sit for so long. I guess it's time for a complete brake job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That happens to my DC if I don't drive it for a while. It has aluminium pistons in brass sleeved cylinders (done by the PO 25 years ago). The aluminium is at the top of the galvanic series so it corrodes and locks up in the cylinder. I just take it apart, clean it all up, scrape off the corrosion products and put it back together, perhaps with new cups if the edges are not so sharp any more. The brass is not affected. It is a chore, to say the least.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are, consider Hagen's in Washington state  . Did my '31 Dodge pickups last month all 4 cyl sleeved in stainless and rebuilt with what ever cups needed replacement . Even replaced rounded off bleeders with good original type and relined shoes . Every thing came back derusted  , sealed  and read to install .

  The turn around was 8 days door to door and price was the best .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've put this in here before. I don't have storage brake problems because I push the pedals down on my vehicles atleast once a month  when walking by them. An old mechnic told me to do it. He used to open the door and kick the pedal! It keeps the cylinder bores wet and prevents,to some extent, rust build up. Another problem is dry cylinders,master and slave,tend to 'chip' away at the lips of the cups and they start to leak. Our braking systems were expected to be used every 2 or 3 days maybe more by the engineers. They never expected that the systems would not be used for months on end.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've put this in here before. I don't have storage brake problems because I push the pedals down on my vehicles atleast once a month  when walking by them. An old mechnic told me to do it. He used to open the door and kick the pedal! It keeps the cylinder bores wet and prevents,to some extent, rust build up. Another problem is dry cylinders,master and slave,tend to 'chip' away at the lips of the cups and they start to leak. Our braking systems were expected to be used every 2 or 3 days maybe more by the engineers. They never expected that the systems would not be used for months on end.

Yep....I was doing the brake pedal push at least once a week while the car sat. I redid the brakes the last time I got the car on the road, but stupid me....I just honed the cylinders and did not do much with the master cylinder at all. I ill be trying to disassemble the system today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure it isn't just a mis-adjusted link between the master cylinder and the pedal or blockage on the relief port of the master cylinder?

No....I am not sure of anything at the moment except I cannot turn the drums or remove them....yet. I backed off the top eccentric bolts and still no turning of the drum/wheel. I guess I will have to find one of those big American made three-arm pullers. I probably have one, but my garage is more like a storage unit with all of the stuff piled up in there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No....I am not sure of anything at the moment except I cannot turn the drums or remove them....yet. I backed off the top eccentric bolts and still no turning of the drum/wheel. I guess I will have to find one of those big American made three-arm pullers. I probably have one, but my garage is more like a storage unit with all of the stuff piled up in there.

If hydraulic pressure not released (problem with master cylinder) then all wheels would/could lockup and backing off the minor adjustment (eccentric bolts) would not release it. It just seems strange to me that all the wheels locked up. Seems like if it were a problem on the wheel side of things then not all wheels would be acting the same.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If hydraulic pressure not released (problem with master cylinder) then all wheels would/could lockup and backing off the minor adjustment (eccentric bolts) would not release it. It just seems strange to me that all the wheels locked up. Seems like if it were a problem on the wheel side of things then not all wheels would be acting the same.

Yep....thank you for that. I will be removing the master cylinder this morning. I am pretty certain it will help. I am probably going to send all of the stuff to Hagen's as Tom mentioned.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have never found the master cylinder to be the problem. Last time, both front flexible hoses were blocked - not collapsed, blocked by dirt. They were dated 1964!

 

If the master cylinder were causing the problem, just releasing the pressure at a bleeder should fix all four wheels.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

If the master cylinder were causing the problem, just releasing the pressure at a bleeder should fix all four wheels.

I figured it would work that the very same way except for one thing. Not so in this case. I believe now that since I have removed the master cylinder and the shoes are still locked in the braking position, I have the problem of the aluminum pistons bonded to the wheel cylinders. The wheels still will not turn. Right now, I am trying to find an American made three-legged hub puller that bolts onto the studs. I certainly do not trust the Chinese items as I have heard of them breaking before removing the hub/drum.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You should be able to adjust the brakes inwards on the upper adjuster and if necessary on the fixed anchor too, to release the drum. I always get away with just the top adjuster.

 

The DC has a thread on the hub for a puller. That is a better way to pull the hub if you can get a puller. Pulling on the wheel studs makes it harder because of elastic deformation: it grips the outer end and opens up the inner end of the hub on the taper and can crack the drum. Remember that hammering on the end of a puller is transferred directly to the bearings and can damage them.

 

I had a puller made for the hub. Tip: get a fine thread on the centre bolt that does the work and lubricate it when you use the puller.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spinneyhill....My other 1931 DB DH6 coupe has the wood spokes and can use the type of threaded puller that you mention, however the car I am working on has the studs through the thick drum hub that was pretty much made for the stud-mounted style puller.

To all of you...I certainly do appreciate all of the helpful hints.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have brass sleeves in your wheels corroding with aluminum pistons . may be cheaper to have some brass cups made ,the design seem pretty simple .

 I know if ends are damaged you can get replacement 1 1/4" alum. pistons from later model Chevys' . 

I will be going with Hagen's and their sleeving with stainless. Then I will probably go with synthetic brake fluid so I don't have this problem again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do some more reading on silicone before you change . I was going to switch when I did total brake rebuild . There was something that stopped me . I do not remember if was that it does not absorb moisture which can cause a ice block in freezing climate . Or that it was developed for the hi -temps. of today disc system that keep it cleaned of condensate .

   I read of classic guys removing and going back to DOT3 .  

 

                               Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Dot 5 vs. Dot 3 argument has been done to death on these forums. You will get plenty of opinions from both sides. I'm going with silicon because mine will be a virgin system with new everything and because I'm sick and tired of Dot 3 eating the paint off anything it touches. I used silicon in my 48 Plymouth and never had a bit of trouble. Others will undoubtedly chime in with opposite experiences and I have no reason to doubt their veracity. Thie whole thing is like arguing who really killed JFK!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi John, I know the feeling on getting old. At present I feel about 80 as I have come down with a severe chest infection and to top that off I have had a fall from a ladder and done serious tendon and ligament damage to my left shoulder 

I told the love of my life that I would repaint the house on the outside before summer and this meant no shed time to work on the Dodge but in reality I had never finished the painting off 9 years ago and it was bugging me that it was not finished.Now I am laid up neither are going to much done to them  

Good luck with the drum removal John  Take care Ron 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FINALLY! I decided to use a 3 foot handled sledge hammer and BOOM, the last drum came loose. Now I can continue my brake job. Has anyone with a 1931 DH6 got the numbers for some brake kits from NAPA? I know i have them SOMEWHERE, but I can never find anything when I actually need it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Napa UP3595 and right side UP3596 are 1-1/4" and 1-3/8" step cyl . Check web site . If you want 1-1/4 straight you can only get  rebuild kits .

I had to have cyl. sleeved to keep mine same oem .

  Some other number I remember kit  WK7  ,  UP6353and 54 do remember what they do . Also UP7  Repair kit . Raybestos WC6354 is another number I have maked down .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...