wishbone

new engine has no power

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Hello guys, I have a 1949 Chrysler Royal.  I've owned it for a couple of years and I am still learning new things on it all the time.  I am trying to take the rear hubs off to check the brakes.  Which way do the bearing nuts turn to remove them?

John is correct, but I think you will have a better response with a new thread started. No bearing nuts in the rear. The nut holds the tapered drum to axle. Get a shop manual for your car if you are performing your own work. Only the front has a nut for the bearings. This is about an engine problem.

Make sure you have a heavy puller. Here is a video to remove rear drum that I made and yes, its amateur made.

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Did the shop check the valve seats for cracks? Did they insert hardened valve seats? If so, the exhaust valve seat may be coming out or not pressed in properly. Some shops do not, but I always lap the valves in to see that they are seating properly after doing a valve job on anything. Dandy Dave!  

 

Update:  Like I posted earlier, after giving the engine a compression test (just the easiest first test for me to give), I discovered that it was extremely low on cylinder 6.  I then researched how to do a leak down test in order to discover "why" it was low.  I made up a tester and only applied 50 lbs. to each of the cylinders at TDC.  No. 6, as suspected did not hold pressure...very little at least.  I could hear air coming from the tail pipe and the adjacent spark plug hole.   Exhaust valve and head gasket it would appear.  I removed the head and everything looked just fine.  Cylinder walls still show cross hatching, valve appear just fine, and the head gasket was perfect.  My guess is that the head is not flat and therefore the gasket wasn't sealing (??).  As well I suppose the valve and/or valve spring need replace.  I don't have a valve spring tester, so I figure I'll just order new ones.  Also, I'm wondering if the valve guides might be a little tight??

 

A couple of notes about the head gasket:  I did not paint it with copper of aluminum paint prior to installation.  Also I put in new head studs, but some of them went in deeper than others...so with the new chrome acorn nuts and thick chrome washers, I suspect that the nuts didn't have as many threads for purchase as others.  I may for leave out the washer or use a thin grade 8 washer instead of the shiny thick chrome ones.

 

Anything obvious jump out at anyone?  Something else to check while I'm at it. 

 

thanks,

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Hey all, thanks for the responses.  I finally had some spare time to get back to the Packard and it's low or no compression problem.  The leak down test pointed to the exhaust valve on cylinder number six as a possible problem so when I finally removed the head and look things over, I discovered that the valve was hitting the head (hammering it actually).  When the shop machined the head I guess they either took too much off, or it had been machined before and this time around it was just a little too much.  So it looks like I either have to track down another head (ebay...has a couple) or perhaps stack a couple of gaskets (??), or maybe relieve the area where the valves where hitting with a die grinder?  Along with replacing the bent valves of course.

 

Anyone ever relieve a head in this way?  Looks to be enough material there.

 

While doing this work, I also discovered the source of my coolant leak near the water inlet and it looks like I need a new water inlet housing.  If anyone has one, I'm in the market.

 

So mystery solved.  I'm glad I posted here though, because now I have a whole arsenal of good information for the next time I have a similar problem.  Thanks!

 

-E

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This is why when somthing is modifeid, (shaving of the head) have proftionals do the insulation. They would have check valve to head clearance with clay.

Glad that you have found the problem. No on the double head gasget. 409s use to do that on the high horse power engines but with steel head gasget. No go with a compound gasket. That is my opioin for the 60s engine and not with the older ones. Thanks for keeping us posted.

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Finding a replacement would be the proper and easiest.

Clearance the valves would be the most fun.

As Dave suggested, use clay.

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OK so you have an "L" head (flathead) engine thathas been milled and the valves are striking the head, correct ? My notes say that is an aluminum head so first thing is to have checked for warp and cracks. OTOH since the original was 6.3:1 compression, raising it a bit for modern gas would not hurt if you have enough cooling for the extra heat generated.

So milling a valve relief in a sound shaved head should not be difficult, just make sure there are no sharp edges. Do you have a feeling for how much you need ?

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Finding a replacement would be the proper and easiest.

Clearance the valves would be the most fun.

As Dave suggested, use clay.

I don't know where I've heard it, and I've never tried it, but instead of using clay, use a tootsie-roll.

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I have struck a problem with valves hitting heads on side valve engines, sometimes the result of new seats sitting a little high and maybe valves with a little more meat than originals. Surfaced heads can contribute too. To solve the problem, take some material off the crown of the valve and the head can have a little material removed to create the clearance required.  I have never struck a head that is skinny on material in the combustion chamber so you should be fine to take as much as .030" there.  

 

Regards

Al

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Alrighty then, no double head gasket it is.  I am leaning towards relieving the head like some have said.  My car is not a show car or very valuable money wise...so doing a little experimenting might be fun and okay.  I think that I'll buy the head I saw on ebay anyways...just in case I screw something up.  If I end up using the new head, I'll do the clay trick before having it machined so the machinist will have an idea of how much he can safely take off.

 

thanks again, E

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Update:  Well, I've relieved the head above each exhaust valve by .010-.012.  It's more than what I need by a margin...let's hope.  One thing I started to wonder is:  with the head milled so far down, did I lose too much flow?  Would it be beneficial (or necessary) to relieve the block like the hot rodders do in order to regain some flow over to the cylinder?  Now is the time to do it...although kinda hard and messy doing it in the car.  The only reason I'm questioning it is because the compression on the other cylinders was so darn high (130-135 lbs).  I think this engine is suppose to have roughly 87 lbs. compression.  Obviously my gauge could be off by a margin, but 40 lbs more seems to be a clear indication that my compression has been significantly increased by the loss of transfer area in the head.

 

Any thoughts?

 

thanks,

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Thought you said you had bought a spare stock head. Problem with milling the block is getting rid of debris you really do not want inside. I'd just give it a try but might take a liking to 89 or 91 octane.

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