Roger Walling

Kids fascinated by my older car.

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 I was driving my 55 Chrysler yesterday and a couple of kids were fascinated by my older car. It was like something that they had never seen.

 

 I though about when I was about 10 and a neighbor was driving his 1919 touring car back and forth from Florida. Wow was that ancient!  Now that I think about it, it was only 41 years old and my 55 is 60 years old.

 

Now a days, I think of a 1975 as a used car, not an antique.

 

 The highlight of my day was when I stopped to see a new train depot that was just built in a neighboring town ,and to admire the new train service in my area.While I was looking at the train, the train engineer was admiring my car!

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We were at a car show near Detroit on the weekend and there was a sign that read, " parents, keep your kids on a leash " ! I found it truly disgusting ! Wayne

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Due to too many parents just letting kids run wild with no supervision and no manners or consideration for other's property.

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 I was driving my 55 Chrysler yesterday and a couple of kids were fascinated by my older car. It was like something that they had never seen.

 

 I though about when I was about 10 and a neighbor was driving his 1919 touring car back and forth from Florida. Wow was that ancient!  Now that I think about it, it was only 41 years old and my 55 is 60 years old.

 

Now a days, I think of a 1975 as a used car, not an antique.

 

 The highlight of my day was when I stopped to see a new train depot that was just built in a neighboring town ,and to admire the new train service in my area.While I was looking at the train, the train engineer was admiring my car!

what country and state was this in?

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Due to too many parents just letting kids run wild with no supervision and no manners or consideration for other's property.

A little tact, diplomacy and common sense would have went a long way. In my opinion it demonstrated a lack of class. Wayne

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It is indeed a rare kid that notices old cars. I think when that happens that we're obligated to to engage

the kid in conversation to reward his interest. Hopefully he'll retain the interaction and develop some

interest in other old cars as well.

Sad part is that his father will see the greyhound radiator cap on my 34 Ford and ask, or declare that it

must be a Jaguar because of the hood ornament. When I explain that it's Greyhound on a Ford like the car

Bonnie & Clyde were killed in, I learn that the father & his friends never even heard of the movie.

At that point I tell the fathers friends not to go hunting with him, because he doesn't know a cat from a

dog.

Actually I had a more intelligent conversation with the kid, there is hope for him.

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I've noticed children (especially boys) staring at

my 1970's cars when they go by.  Even my

1979 Buick Electra is something they have never seen

and gets noticed.  My 1961 Imperial, with its

tall and sharp fins, passed through a parking lot

and had one 7-year-old with his jaw open in awe!

 

Yes, friends, there is hope.

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In the tiny town near me (one post office, one fire house, one general store) the store held a small off-the-cuff car show on Sunday.  Twenty cars showed up despite a lack of publicity.  A father (or grandfather?) was showing his 4- or 5-year old my car, lifting him up to look inside but telling the kid he mustn't touch the car.  I suggested he plop the kid right in the driver's seat, to his surprise.  (The seats are just vinyl, nothing valuable here!)  The youngster seemed to enjoy himself sitting behind the wheel, turning the steering wheel.  Within reason, I think car owners ought to encourage kids to get in the cars, so long as they clearly remind the kids (and parents) that most people do not like kids letting touching or getting into their cars. In this case, the father / grandfather was obviously aware of that.

 

It's not like the old days.  Kids nowadays are no longer gearheads as we were at their age.  It's all about video games and texting now.  They have to be enticed into sampling our world.   We have a selling job to do if there is to be an old car hobby in 20 years.

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In the tiny town near me (one post office, one fire house, one general store) the store held a small off-the-cuff car show on Sunday.  Twenty cars showed up despite a lack of publicity.  A father (or grandfather?) was showing his 4- or 5-year old my car, lifting him up to look inside but telling the kid he mustn't touch the car.  I suggested he plop the kid right in the driver's seat, to his surprise.  (The seats are just vinyl, nothing valuable here!)  The youngster seemed to enjoy himself sitting behind the wheel, turning the steering wheel.  Within reason, I think car owners ought to encourage kids to get in the cars, so long as they clearly remind the kids (and parents) that most people do not like kids letting touching or getting into their cars. In this case, the father / grandfather was obviously aware of that.

 

It's not like the old days.  Kids nowadays are no longer gearheads as we were at their age.  It's all about video games and texting now.  They have to be enticed into sampling our world.   We have a selling job to do if there is to be an old car hobby in 20 years.

Hear, hear ! Wayne

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Funny this subject should come up.

Just yesterday I was out in my '65 Mustang and met up with a former neighbor lady who was out walking with her 5-6 year old grandson whom I had taken for rides in my '19 Touring T and '25 Dodge.

I stopped to talk and her grandson said "I didn't know you had a Mustang.......Mustang is my FAVORITE car!"........  :P

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Funny this subject should come up.

Just yesterday I was out in my '65 Mustang and met up with a former neighbor lady who was out walking with her 5-6 year old grandson whom I had taken for rides in my '19 Touring T and '25 Dodge.

I stopped to talk and her grandson said "I didn't know you had a Mustang.......Mustang is my FAVORITE car!"........  :P

So ??? Did he get a ride in the Mustang ? Wayne

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My neighbor's two small children were amazed looking at my Ford.  They had never seen tires with "white on the side."  They were thrilled to operate the manual windows, having grown up with power windows.  Their dad couldn't believe I let them crawl all over the inside of the car.  The little fingerprints wiped right off. 

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In the tiny town near me (one post office, one fire house, one general store) the store held a small off-the-cuff car show on Sunday.  Twenty cars showed up despite a lack of publicity.  A father (or grandfather?) was showing his 4- or 5-year old my car, lifting him up to look inside but telling the kid he mustn't touch the car.  I suggested he plop the kid right in the driver's seat, to his surprise.  (The seats are just vinyl, nothing valuable here!)  The youngster seemed to enjoy himself sitting behind the wheel, turning the steering wheel.  Within reason, I think car owners ought to encourage kids to get in the cars, so long as they clearly remind the kids (and parents) that most people do not like kids letting touching or getting into their cars. In this case, the father / grandfather was obviously aware of that.

 

It's not like the old days.  Kids nowadays are no longer gearheads as we were at their age.  It's all about video games and texting now.  They have to be enticed into sampling our world.   We have a selling job to do if there is to be an old car hobby in 20 years."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 I bring a dragster to a few car shows and if I see a small child looking at it I tell the parent to lift the kid in and take a pic.

 

 It's funny that when the parent has a few kids, the older one (about 12) does not want to take part in the photo shoot. (to mature for that kind of stuff)

 

 

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We've got the Charlotte Autofair this month. After judging our region show, I'll spend most of Saturday afternoon letting kids --and parents-- sit in one of our DPC cars. It's a great way to talk with young families about our region and AACA.

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Here is a link to some fun: http://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

 

I was 30 years old in 1978 when I purchased my 1964 Riviera for $2100. I also had to pay tax at about 30% to have the $2100 in hand, about $2700 to earn. That's about $8,000 in discretionary money for today's youth.

 

We old farts saved a lot of cars. My daughter is young. Her extra money is being invested in her future, not my memories.

 

Bernie

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So ??? Did he get a ride in the Mustang ? Wayne

 

Not this time Wayne........his grandma would have a pretty hard time getting into the back seat........but it WILL happen....... ;)

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I've noticed children (especially boys) staring at

my 1970's cars when they go by.  Even my

1979 Buick Electra is something they have never seen

and gets noticed.  My 1961 Imperial, with its

tall and sharp fins, passed through a parking lot

and had one 7-year-old with his jaw open in awe!

 

Yes, friends, there is hope.

. Last Sunday I drove my '75 Olds convertible for the first time in nearly twenty years. With the top down and all accumulated patina, I went to the nearest gas station a mile away. While at the pump, teens and preteens pointed and smiled. The patron at the next pump commented "hey, nice car!" I replied, "it was even nicer when I bought it forty years ago".

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Not this time Wayne........his grandma would have a pretty hard time getting into the back seat........but it WILL happen....... ;)

I am sure it will may friend, I am sure if will! Wayne

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I was working in my garage on my 1931 Reo Royale which is in pieces . A little 5 year old girl passed by with her father and told me . " You should go to the car store and buy a new car " . I agreed I would go to the store laughing and get a new car . The father said nothing and left with the his child . Sometimes the children these days are the more interested ones .

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I was working in my garage on my 1931 Reo Royale which is in pieces . A little 5 year old girl passed by with her father and told me . " You should go to the car store and buy a new car " . I agreed I would go to the store laughing and get a new car . The father said nothing and left with the his child . Sometimes the children these days are the more interested ones .

Smart kid.

 

On the shelf above me is a copy of  Ralph Stein's Treasury of the Automobile It arrived at our village library in 1961.

 

There two pictures dramatically affected my life. One is an unrestored Mercer, the other is the completed restored car. In 1961 I thought "I can do that!". Fifty years later I realize I should have thought "How can I get that guy's car!"

Bernie

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Within reason, I think car owners ought to encourage kids to get in the cars, so long as they clearly remind the kids (and parents) that most people do not like kids letting touching or getting into their cars. In this case, the father / grandfather was obviously aware of that.

 

It's not like the old days.  Kids nowadays are no longer gearheads as we were at their age.  It's all about video games and texting now.  They have to be enticed into sampling our world.   We have a selling job to do if there is to be an old car hobby in 20 years.

 

I agree about encouraging kids to get into the cars to check them out, within reason.  I have noticed at car shows that people are generally watchful over others' vehicles.  It is frustrating when parents who don't care about cars let their kids run amuck amongst the cars ... disturbing & perturbing many owners.

 

That selling job is going to get tougher & tougher, given today's technology.  BUT, I have seen some glimmer of hope here 'n' there.  Sometimes, I'm surprised by the kids who ARE interested in older cars, if that makes sense.

 

 

Cort :) www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve | 1979 Caprice Classic
"Let's don't let a good thing die" __ Elvis Presley __ 'Suspicious Minds'

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A guy was asking me why I was pumping the gas pedal.

 

I told him there was no choke plate in the carburetor, then he was really confused.

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A guy was asking me why I was pumping the gas pedal.

 

I told him there was no choke plate in the carburetor, then he was really confused.

 

It's easy to give a novice an answer that confuses him;

every hobby has its jargon.  The challenge, Jack, is to

explain so he'll understand and even increase his interest

in old cars!

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I explained it. But he had never owned a carburetor.

Youth is wasted on the young.

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