LuxDriver

Favorite cars of the 70s-80s? Like to hear what the general thoughts are..

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Mostly have cars in the 20's & 30's but really like my 1983 Imperial. I enjoy driving / riding in vehicles throughout all the decades.

IMG_3301.JPG

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Beautiful Imperial, 4Hud!

 

Has it been a good and reliable car for you?

(I don't know how reliable those 1981-83 Imperials are,

even if the fuel injection has been converted to a carburetor,

and I've tended to shy away from cars if I'm not sure about their record.)

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9 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

Not completely true.  Very few Duesenbergs actually got scrapped.  They might have gotten cheap (relatively speaking) but they still rarely changed hands in the hundreds of dollars range.  By 1960 the prices were already climbing.  There was always somebody that wanted a Duesenberg.

I heard of one instance of a Duesenberg in the hundreds of dollars (asking price) range. My Grandfather said a gentleman drove up to his jewelry store about 1944 in a Duesenberg, J-580 to be exact. He was wanting to sell for $500 and knew Glenn D., my Grandfather, was collecting old cars. Glenn went out and looked at it and thought about buying....but then said no because of parts, service, fuel consumption, and gas rationing. The car actually stuck around in my hometown for a long time, my Grandpa kept tabs on it, and it wound up going down to one of the first Leake Auctions in Oklahoma and selling about 1974. An AACA Forums member named allcars can corroborate at least some of the story. Y'all know grandfathers would never tell a whopper to a teenager, right?

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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You should add 1968 and 1969.. the last year of the big blocks.. The 68 -  69 cars were not tuned down until the 70's..

spring.JPG

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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Somewhere I have a photo of a car lot taken in I guess the early 1950s. There is a Duesenberg on the lot for $450. Next to it is a '48 Chev. A Dues Limo changed hands here locally in about 1970 for $10k. Yes, there was a time when even Duesenbergs were very cheap.

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11 hours ago, nick8086 said:

You should add 1968 and 1969.. the last year of the big blocks..

spring.JPG

 You must have a Chevy in it. Pontiac never made a big block.

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Pontiac never really made a small block then either. Their blocks were all the same size.

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In 1968 -69  You could get  a great car... I just call them big blocks... for the horsepower they made.. Not the size...

 

 

"Pontiac did make the  gto  judge"  

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)

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22 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

Somewhere I have a photo of a car lot taken in I guess the early 1950s. There is a Duesenberg on the lot for $450. Next to it is a '48 Chev. A Dues Limo changed hands here locally in about 1970 for $10k. Yes, there was a time when even Duesenbergs were very cheap.

 

That 10k in 1970 would be a decent house in most parts of the country.   I know that 8500 got you a complete but needing full restoration Murphy conv sedan in the mid 60s.

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I remember seeing an ad for a Duesey (think it was a J) for $600 alongside one for a Merc 300SL Gullwing for $6k. Disremember when but a tract house was $5k.

 

70 was the last year for a high compression engine from GM, Ford and MOPAR offered for another year or two but by 73 all had been retuned for regular unleaded. Even the SD455 only had 8.5:1 compression.

 

It wasn't until DOHC and VVT I&e came along with 10:1 compression that could run on 87 PON that power came back.

 

Note: until 1971ish HP was measured at SAE Gross, after SAE Net was used. Net is about 30% less than Gross so a 350 hp engine in 1970 became a 245 hp engine in 1972 so the 290 hp 6 in my Jeep would be about 400 old style. At 6400 rpm.

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19 hours ago, Bleach said:

Pontiac never really made a small block then either. Their blocks were all the same size.

Pontiac made what we call a medium block which all use the same rough outside dimension, bore spacing, and connecting rod. In 1955 it started out as a 287, but engineers had a eye for things to come so they gave it room to grow. 287, 316.6, 347, 370, 389, 400, 336, 326, 350 really a 355, 421, 428 really a 427, 455-really a 456. and the short deck 301, 265 of the 80's 

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On April 14, 2016 at 8:18 AM, Tom99 said:

Very few people seem to have an interest in it, it's not a muscle car.

 

If you're on Facebook, you might take a peak at this fairly new page, dedicated to the GM N bodies:
https://www.facebook.com/BuickSomerset/?fref=ts

 

 

Cort > www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pigValve.paceMaker.cowValve | 79 CC to ?? Mercury Grand Marquis!!

"We all do the best we can" __ Blaine Larson __ 'How Do You Get That Lonely?'

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1970 Audi 100 SL 4 spd. Sunroof with leather interior. Cruising Miami Beach back when Wolfies ment something and all the hotels had high diving boards. 

1980 Honda Civic hatchback DX 4 spd. Scaling up sidewalks when traffic was held up because some rear drive car could not make it up the Jersey hills during snowy winter days. And driving and parking in New York was a blast. 

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Honda Wagovan's are pretty cool, and they even made a 4wd model with a super low first gear. 

 

13845186-EA41-4CC9-91AA-9E26872AC905.jpg

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On ‎2016‎-‎04‎-‎15 at 10:25 PM, John_S_in_Penna said:

Beautiful Imperial, 4Hud!

 

Has it been a good and reliable car for you?

(I don't know how reliable those 1981-83 Imperials are,

even if the fuel injection has been converted to a carburetor,

and I've tended to shy away from cars if I'm not sure about their record.)

Yes, it has been good, the previous owners kept good care of it. The fuel injection system on the 318 was removed by the dealership and the digital dash still works fine.

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22 hours ago, 4Hud said:

Yes, it has been good, the previous owners kept good care of it. The fuel injection system on the 318 was removed by the dealership and the digital dash still works fine.

 

Did they use a Bendix EFI system also?

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1 hour ago, John348 said:

 

Did they use a Bendix EFI system also?

Hey John, The car had a significant industry first: continuous flow electronic fuel injection developed by the Chrysler engineers who had worked on the Apollo space program, combined with a on-board flow meter to measure the quantity of fuel fed to the engine and send date to a air cleaner mounted computer with the usual sensors for input.

 It is interesting to me how Chrysler gave up on this system and retrofitted the 318 with a carburetor, when VW, Porsche  ( and probably MB & BMW ) who had been using CSI mechanical injection up through 1983 had switched to Electronic CSI in 1984 and beyond without mishap.   

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It was my first car.. Mine was blue:

 

1970 Chrysler station wagon.. It did not have the best  gas mileage Maybe 3-5..MPG...

 

Sometimes hard to find.. They were not crushed by used at the county fairs... for the Demolition Derby..

big blockk.JPG

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, nick8086 said:

1970 Chrysler station wagon.. It did not have the best  gas mileage Maybe 3-5..MPG...

 

Nick, I'll bet that, if your family measured the gas mileage,

they would find much better than 3-5 miles per gallon.

 

Maybe 8 around town, maybe 10 or 12.   I can't say for sure;

but I've read contemporary road tests of similar cars.

 

I had a 1973 Cadillac Eldorado convertible that achieved 

6 m.p.g around town and 10 on the highway, for a consistent

average of 8;  and that was exactly what Consumer Guide

measured on their test of the same model, built after pollution

controls sapped power and efficiency.

 

Since many car fans read this forum, I wanted to give my input.

We wouldn't want to dissuade today's collectors from getting those cars!

I know 8 m.p.g is bad, but it is 167% better than 3, and I don't think

any well-maintained production car could ever have gotten 3.

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When I ran the FEA National Fuel Economy Challenge in Miami, I tried to find a Chrysler 440 wagon but had to settle for an Electric Buick with a 455 because it had nearly as bad MPG. Was a matter of reading the rules which graded cars by the % improvement. That car was tuned so tight it squeaked. Part of the test was an exhaust sniffer. Car in front read low , the Buick read zero. Much head scratching. In the end the award was received in secret because we didn't fit the profile and the numbers were a bit absurd. On TV the award went to a family in a Chrysler Station Wagon (am told, never saw the show).

 

fea.jpg

 

ps the rated MPG of a '75 Monaco 440 wagon was 10/16 and the Electra 455 was 11/15

pps the 1957 Rochester FI was a constant flow unit but all mechanical. I used a TCS switch on my 65 to control the inevitable leak in the cranking signal valve.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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The car had 178,000 miles on it . 440 - 4  barrel carburetor. 16 years old...

I am  sure it got 3-5..MPG.. in town... Gas was 67-72 cents...

 

1970 Chrysler station wagon.

 

 

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Pretty sure it was in fall '76 but someone from the Florida region (Miami) SCCA should know, they put it on. The Federal Energy Administration was merged into the DOE in 1977 and think the '75 Buick Electra 225 was a year old. Just sent an eMail to the Florida Region and asked if they have any record.

75buick.jpg

 

ps Hard to believe that was 40 years ago.

 

pps 72 Wagon 400/4bbl  got 15 mpg on the road, 12.5 with AC on or towing race car (used to win tow car races). Had a special order "economy" axle: 3.08 posi and turned 3000 rpm at 70. 6.5-7.5 liter engines turning over 3k at 70 with barn door styling like the Buick was a good part of the reason for poor corporate fuel economy in the early 70s. Sometime I'll talk about the 67 Camaro with a FI 327 that got 25 mpg on the Interstate and won autocrosses in 1972. My first economy run was sometime in the early 60s.

 

pps the basic Pontiac V8 had common dimensions but were small journal (up to 400 cid) and large journal (421, 428, 455). The main differences were the heads and the cranks (though if you put a 6X head (eight manifold bolts - ask anyone who has tried to seal a 7K3 knows why) on a 421 or 428 (personally never cared for the 455) you could make a lot of power).

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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