LuxDriver

Favorite cars of the 70s-80s? Like to hear what the general thoughts are..

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16 hours ago, Big Beat said:

If you look at old photos of car shows, the cars  in the background are now just as antique as the ones on display. Well, today I'd probably be more interested to stroll through a c. 1970s - 1980s parking lot than through that show field. 

 

Well said, Big Beat!  It would be interesting to see the

mixture of cars that were around back then.  It would give

us more insight into that part of history than what people

may remember many decades later.

 

And different parts of the country would show different mixes of cars.

A parking lot at a high-end California country club

--with more expensive and exotic cars, all rust-free--

would be quite different from a shopping center in New York State.

In that northern shopping center, cars would be more modest,

and the oldest cars would no longer exist due to salt and rust.  

 

I remember from growing up then, that a 10-year-old car was a rarity.

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I love the 73 Century Gran Sports. (Have a few!) Last year for a 455 Stage 1 with a 4 speed. Way better ride, handling and style than the Skylarks it replaced. 728 Stage 1's built. 92 Stage 1 4 speeds built. 45 Stage 1 SunCoupes built like the yellow SCO car shown, Black one is a 4 speed. Awaiting the finish of my Harvest Gold 4 speed hopefully in time for the Eastern NJ meet. The only American car in 73 faster was the SD455 Trans Am.

IMG_9759.JPG

IMG_6950.JPG

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Forgot about posting this one.  Mid 80's Toyota Corolla GTS.  I'm currently on the lookout for a clean hatchback. 

 

 

Toyota-1985-Corolla-SR5-hatch-c.jpg

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I remember growing up that every year the cars were better/faster and a car was considered worn out at 100k. Every kid knew every car by the taillights. Was a time when a three year old car was "old" and a Chevvy convertible with AM radio, 283 2bbl powerglide & power steering but manual brakes was obviously a rental.

 

Of course I also remember seeing rusty new cars on dealer's lots.

 

BTW I won a lot of autocrosses (and surprised a few Z-28s) with my '70 GS. Bit lighter than a 73.

 

buvette2.jpg

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, padgett said:

I remember growing up that every year the cars were better/faster and a car was considered worn out at 100k....

 

I came a bit later.  I remember, growing up, that every year

the cars were lighter and flimsier, with more plastic than

the cars that came before!  

 

Hmmm.  That might be one reason why today's youth

have less interest in cars.  But it's also a reason they COULD be

intrigued by the old ones---

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        Posted 13 hours ago (edited) · Report post

I remember growing up that every year the cars were better/faster and a car was considered worn out at 100k. Every kid knew every car by the taillights

 

 I assume you are talking about cars from the 50's 60's. I know you are a smart enough guy to know  that cars of the 70's 80's 90's+ etc. were changing also, just in a different way. Examples would be in the realm of safety and emissions. Once the emission problems were brought under control, the next thing was to concentrate on mileage, after we got better mileage under control we started to work on performance again so that where we are today we have better mileage, better performance, and a much safer car. As far as body styling goes, much of styling is dictated by weight of the materials in a car, what happens in the wind tunnel, and safety equipment requirements.

 When I was a kid ( like five years old ) my dad would point to a car and I would be able to tell him make and most time year, however today most cars seem to look alike is what I hear. If I were to take a 32 Ford roadster, and a 32 Chevrolet roadster and ask my great grandson ( 7)  from 30 feet what was Chevy or Ford I know what he would say. " They both look  the same".

Ask yourself about this strange phenomenon; You buy a new car and suddenly you seem to see your make of car everywhere you drive.  

 

 

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3 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

I came a bit later.  I remember, growing up, that every year

the cars were lighter and flimsier, with more plastic than

the cars that came before!  

 

Hmmm.  That might be one reason why today's youth

have less interest in cars.  But it's also a reason they COULD be

intrigued by the old ones---

We all know the usual distractions kids have these days, but consider this. These days if you want to go fast you are better off buying a fast factory car and that equals in most cases big bucks. Unlike the days of installing 2X4's and manifold, a hot cam a set of headers, and a turbo 350 or 400 and a 4.10 posi. on your 56 Chevy. Most kids today don't have the shop classes or knowledge we had, or consider this; unless a part has a CARB # you can't modify your car's engine or exhaust in any way legally. Safety inspections and emission testing have killed all the fun in modifying a new car in today's world.

You must remember when I or most of us on this forum were a kids our society was a can do society and today it's a can't do society. A example of that would be when I was a kid ( I lived in the outskirts but in the city of Los Angeles ) I could put my 22 rifle over my shoulder and walk down my street and go to the fields nearby and go dove hunting. Today that neighborhood is much the same and some of the fields are still there but if you did that especially at the age of ten, not only would you be in trouble but social services would have you taken away from your parents and tossed your parents in jail. Back then the conversation would be my mom saying what have you brought home for dinner?

 

Edited by helfen (see edit history)

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"The rules are different here" (Florida slogan from a few years ago. We have no CARB. No inspections or emissions testing (removed in the 70's). And despite all of the snowbirds clogging the Interstate there is still a hundred mile stretch of the turnpike with one exit.

 

Personally I really like FI but am a sucker for lotsa carbs. Need to decide whether to put dual quads or a 66 tripower on the Judge...

 

ps: never had a .22, did have a .44 mag though.

 

pps 73 SD 455 Trans Am was fast but the 89 Trans Am was faster (had a six).

 

 

carbs.jpg

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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25 minutes ago, padgett said:

"The rules are different here" (Florida slogan from a few years ago. We have no CARB. No inspections or emissions testing (removed in the 70's). And despite all of the snowbirds clogging the Interstate there is still a hundred mile stretch of the turnpike with one exit.

 

Personally I really like FI but am a sucker for lotsa carbs. Need to decide whether to put dual quads or a 66 tripower on the Judge...

 

ps: never had a .22, did have a .44 mag though.

 

pps 73 SD 455 Trans Am was fast but the 89 Trans Am was faster (had a six).

 

 

carbs.jpg

 You know even though your county or state does not have emission testing, cars that were built with exhaust emission controls are requited by the federal government to have those devises on the car. Sometimes it makes it very hard to get a car registered when a car is sold out of a county or state by some moron who removed all the emission equipment.

I had that .22 when I was ten. If you had a .44Mag when you were ten you must have been one big fellow and used two hands. 

Edited by helfen (see edit history)

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10 hours ago, helfen said:

I could put my 22 rifle over my shoulder and walk down my street and go to the fields nearby and go dove hunting. Today that neighborhood is much the same and some of the fields are still there but if you did that especially at the age of ten, not only would you be in trouble but social services would have you taken away from your parents and tossed your parents in jail. Back then the conversation would be my mom saying what have you brought home for dinner?

 

That must have been the same time Granny asked Jethro the same thing!

 

Craig

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24 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

That must have been the same time Granny asked Jethro the same thing!

 

Craig

Nope, ten years before the Beverly Hillbillies

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It's really nothing special, but it is mine, and I bought it new in June 1985.

My Oldsmobile Calais has a 5 speed manual transmission, HD suspension, and some other odd options.

85_Olda_Calais.jpg

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For me the best cars in the 80s are the 20 year old cars that were in the used car lots of the time. :-)

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4 hours ago, Tom99 said:

It's really nothing special, but it is mine, and I bought it new in June 1985.

My Oldsmobile Calais has a 5 speed manual transmission, HD suspension, and some other odd options.

85_Olda_Calais.jpg

Been to a car show with it? I bet it would attract attention. Have more pictures??

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6 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

With all the talk of hunting and small game,

I had to scroll up to the top to remind myself

what the original topic was--

It was a metaphor.

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19 hours ago, helfen said:

Been to a car show with it? I bet it would attract attention. Have more pictures??

I've only had it in one show. It was an Oldsmobile Club of America zone show. My car received Chairmans Choice, and class awards.

Most of the shows here in Houston are 1979 and earlier, or it is put in with newer Mustang's, Corvette's and Camaro's. I don't bother

showing it. Very few people seem to have an interest in it, it's not a muscle car.

The car is all original, except the two outside mirrors have been repainted, and I know have different wheels on it. The 205 70 R13's are hard to find, and

they are expensive. For driving, I have American Racing wheels, and 14" tires on it.

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6 hours ago, Tom99 said:

...My car received Chairman's Choice, and class awards.

Most of the shows here in Houston are 1979 and earlier....

Very few people seem to have an interest in it, it's not a muscle car....

 

Tom, EVERY car, before it's appreciated, goes through a period of being ignored.

Even Duesenbergs languished on car lots, since who would want an outdated gas-guzzler?

 

Just take the apathy in stride, and appreciate the fact that you're preserving history.

Eventually people will wonder where they all went, and you or your children will have one.

You could even put a card on the windshield explaining that it has a factory stick-shift--

that alone might bring it some more attention!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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52 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Tom, EVERY car, before it's appreciated, goes through a period of being ignored.

Even Duesenbergs languished on car lots, since who would want an outdated gas-guzzler?

 

Not completely true.  Very few Duesenbergs actually got scrapped.  They might have gotten cheap (relatively speaking) but they still rarely changed hands in the hundreds of dollars range.  By 1960 the prices were already climbing.  There was always somebody that wanted a Duesenberg.

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I think the Studebaker Avanti set a record in recovering from the depreciation cycle to its original selling price. I don't think there are many others that come close.

 

Today a 1991 car is eligible for all the benefits of an antique car. And it reflects in my online searches. I have a mushy spot between the ears for the V12 BMW coupes and it is a sweet spot for the Silver Spurs. A 1991 5.7 Fleetwood Brougham in the right color would be a great score and probably on a $6500 budget. Imagine the car you could get for 10K. That's is a little less than the equivalent value I paid for my Riviera in 1978.

 

Even though my Impala SS is only 22 years old it is recognized as a desirable variation of the Caprice and has had collector insurance since it turned 20.

 

Looking for a bigger building!

Bernie

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2 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

I think the Studebaker Avanti set a record in recovering from the depreciation cycle to its original selling price. I don't think there are many others that come close.

 

Today a 1991 car is eligible for all the benefits of an antique car. And it reflects in my online searches. I have a mushy spot between the ears for the V12 BMW coupes and it is a sweet spot for the Silver Spurs. A 1991 5.7 Fleetwood Brougham in the right color would be a great score and probably on a $6500 budget. Imagine the car you could get for 10K. That's is a little less than the equivalent value I paid for my Riviera in 1978.

 

Even though my Impala SS is only 22 years old it is recognized as a desirable variation of the Caprice and has had collector insurance since it turned 20.

 

Looking for a bigger building!

Bernie

The only problem with a Fleetwood of that age is it's got a Chevy V-8. Cadillac owners don't like that.

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I say none although the 70 Chevelle SS has possibilities as the 70 Corvette with the solid lifter motor.  I guess I am not interested if it isn't solid lifters and two fours! :):) 

Robert

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The '91 5.7 IS desirable because of the SBC. It departed from the 4-6-8, the 4100 HT, the Olds 307; and the upcoming Northstar. A sailor in Shanghai couldn't make that many mistakes, even after 4 months at sea.

 

Last year Cadillac came out with the Dare Greatly ad campaign. Listen closely to the words of its background song:

 

Three decades of blunders nearly destroyed our image, but we have no regrets. We fumbled around and now we have made alphabet soup.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

The '91 5.7 IS desirable because of the SBC. It departed from the 4-6-8, the 4100 HT, the Olds 307; and the upcoming Northstar. A sailor in Shanghai couldn't make that many mistakes, even after 4 months at sea.

 

Last year Cadillac came out with the Dare Greatly ad campaign. Listen closely to the words of its background song:

 

Three decades of blunders nearly destroyed our image, but we have no regrets. We fumbled around and now we have made alphabet soup.

Bernie

That's why the only desirable ones are before 81 with real Cadillac people. Chevy in a Cadillac = Chevy

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Pontiac was the first with the soup. Remember the '81 Gooole ? T1000 ? At least the Europeans referred to the engine size.

 

ps Guess you never saw a LT1 distributer dripping coolant.

 

pps had the Super Blackhawk in Texas after an all expense paid tour of SEA. Used it to blow up milk cartons full of water mostly to shut up the kid next door who was plinking away with a .22 far too early in the morning. Open frame was a touch loud.

 

ppps note that three of the cars in my sig (and in my garage) are from the 70s and 80s and the bottom one is a '93 (made in '92 so an antique next year). All are interesting.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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