Linus Tremaine

Lincoln Collector Jack Passey

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All, 

I wanted to pass along the sad news that long time Lincoln collector Jack Passey has died. He was 88.

 

Jack was a great friend to myself and many other antique car enthusiasts. He helped countless people over his life and saved many lincolns from the recycler during their most vulnerable times. 

 

 Here is a photo of Jack and with myself, my car and two other Lincoln Owners Club members. Jack owned my car in the late 1960s.

post-103273-0-55356600-1440439162_thumb.

Edited by Linus Tremaine (see edit history)
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His inherent knowledge and wisdom can never be replaced. May he rest in peace and may his family and friend appreciate that this man made a significant contribution to the lives of many. Wayne

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So sorry to hear my friend died. A great gentleman and a true car collector. I visited him last year, and wanted to stop in and see him while at Pebble last week but was told by friends it wouldn't be possible. He will always be remembered as long as Lincoln cars of the thirties are driven, as he had touched so many of them with his own hands. Rest in peace old friend. ed

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That certainly was a great video, I wish I could have known the man personally.

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The video was great and so is his book, "For the love of old cars, the Jack Passey story." Great story, great man.

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Sadly, not unexpected. I was fortunate to have known Jack nearly my whole life. My dad had gone to college with Jack's brother and Jack back in the late '40s. They stayed friends for many years, and when I began seriously showing an interest in antique automobiles at about the age of 14 (nearly 50 years ago!), Jacks collection was the first place we went.

Jack had such a welcoming and easy-going manner, it was always nice to visit with him. Many, MANY, people considered him to be close and personal friends of theirs, and rightfully so. I was always glad to be among them.

Peace be with you Jack. You were one of the best of the best.

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I feel it should be added, that although Jack devoted a great deal of his energies to collecting and restoring Lincolns of the '20s and '30s, he was also a very well rounded collector. The first Stutz I ever saw up close was his, as were a couple of Locomobiles, a Pope Hartford, a Diana, a Simplex (he talked about the beautiful sound of those "chain drives singing" while on tour, "nothing else quite like it!"), and at least three Duesenbergs that I saw up close and even heard running.

I was visiting him and his collection about 40 years ago. He had recently sold his Duesenberg for a really good offer, then bought a dual cowl phaeton ('33 If I recall correctly). The phone rang, he answered, I never asked who it was But Jack was telling the other fellow on the phone about how he just couldn't turn down that offer for his car. Then he thought "But Jack Passey just can't not have a DUESENBERG! So of course I just had to go out and buy another one!" There were many times I heard him refer to himself that way, I found it quite charming.

He will be missed. By many people, and for a long time.

Wayne Sheldon

Edited by wayne sheldon (see edit history)
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Jack was a true gentleman, a trusted and a valued friend. I could always depend on his judgement when considering which cars to add to our collection. No matter what other obligations he might have had, when I phoned just to chat, or to ask his thoughts on a particular type of car, Jack was direct and forthcoming with his advice and often even knew the particular car, as well a current and prior owners. He was always totally unselfish with his time and the benefit of his vast experience.

 

Rest in peace, Jack, and our condolences to Mona and all their family.

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Unfortunately, I have not spent nearly enough of my time lately being active in the antique cars hobby. The curse of a needy family. So, many of my wonderful memories are from years ago. And as I approach "that" age myself, my memory is becoming less reliable.

I have been trying to recall the sequence of the three Duesenbergs I remember from his collections. I clearly recall talking with him, and his telling another friend about it on the phone, when he bought the dual cowl phaeton. As I recall, it was either a '32 or '33 J. What I do remember is his showing me how the front fenders had been updated by the Duesenberg factory when the car was only a couple years old. The fenders had originally been the more open sided style common in the late '20s up until about '32. Shortly after that, Duesenberg, along with most other quality auto makers started putting skirts on the back part of the fender behind the front wheel. This was a short-lived style change that soon disappeared into further styling and fender changes. Being an original "Classic Era" and factory modification, was considered correct either way by the CCCA. Jack seemed unsure of which way he would leave the car. The car was largely unrestored original, and a sort of off-green color if I recall correctly. I saw the car a couple years later at a show, and it still looked basically as it was when he had gotten it.

Another Duesenberg I remember was I think a 1925 Model A Duesenberg. It was at about the time he was moving from San Jose, and several cars were tightly packed into a back corner of his building. I only looked at it a little bit because access was tight, and I never wanted to crowd his cars. I remember that it was also green, and beautifully restored. Since I have always tended to prefer earlier cars, I really liked that one.

The J series Duesenbergs may be most collector's favorite, but I always favored the model A. Of all the J series Duesenbergs I have ever seen, whether in person, or in photographs, my absolute favorite was Jack's 1929 Murphy bodied roadster. It was mostly black, with a little red accent here and there. The look, the balance, the flow of the body lines was perfect. I know it was more than forty years ago, but I cannot remember just where in the sequence he had that one. I watched him drive it into his shop one day. What a sweet sound.

 

All those Lincolns, more than 60 at one time if I recall correctly. The many Horseless Carriage automobiles I preferred, The Pierce Arrows he sometimes called a "Lumbering car" while rolling his shoulders around (yet he had several and drove them often, clearly he liked them a lot).

 

Yes, he may have been best known as the "Lincoln Collector", and one of the foremost authorities on early Lincoln automobiles. But Jack was an expert on many of the world's greatest automobiles. His was a very well rounded collection. And he was a wonderful, and charming person.

 

Me? I just wanted to bounce this back to the top for another day or two. For Jack.

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:(  RIP, Jack.

 

 

Cort :) www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve

 

"My time here is over" __ Patty Loveless __ 'How Can I Help You Say Goodbye?'

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I should have bought the book years ago. But never did. It may go up in price now. I never had enough money for the cars I wanted, and although I have about a hundred antique automobile books (and a few hundred other collectible books), I always seem to put off buying books trying to put my money into cars instead. Jack's book, and Carl Pate's early Ford book have been on my Santa Claus list for years, but I am still waiting for them. Just to be clear. I have never met Carl Pate.

Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2

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Wayne, 

Last I heard they were out of print. It looks like you can order one still though? They say 4-6 weeks which seems to imply that it has to be printed. Will they just print one for you? I dont know. I think they will wait until enough orders are placed to make another production run. I would try to order one asap and see what happens.

 

ANYONE who likes antique cars should have this book. It is a priceless view into the history of the hobby.

 

L

 

http://mtpublishing.com/index.php/soon/love-of-cars.html#.VeXIJ_lVhBc

Edited by Linus Tremaine (see edit history)

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Jack will certainly be missed. I first met him in the 1970s, at that time he owned an old warehouse in Freedom CA. In addition to his car collection he had a hobby shop in one corner of the building. It was about a mile from where I lived and as a kid I'd ride my bike to his place to buy a model airplane or model car. Over the years since then, I'd often run into him at local car events or see him driving one of his Lincolns around town. He was one of the most open and helpful car guys you'd ever meet. He didn't own his cars for status or showing off he was a true car oficionado. One thing that struck me was how he kept his collector cars. None were covered, every tire was pumped up, no dust anywhere, just awsome looking cars to enjoy. I last visited his collection with a group of friends in 2011 and snapped the attached picture. RIP Jack.passey.jpg

Edited by Dean_H. (see edit history)
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Jack was a long time friend of the John Carlson family from Canada. Jack and Mona and the kids traveled with us on many CCCA Caravans in the 80's & 90's.

 

We were lucky & grateful to spend a full week with Jack & Mona in April, 2015 just 3 months before he passed. He loved to tell a good joke/story and smiled often. Always a gentlemen with twinkle in his eye.

 

One of many things Jack collected were 'period' model airplanes (new in box) & early pre 1955 model engines. The 'Passey Hanger' was Jacks former hobby shop in Watsonville. Jack had one of the most significant model collections in the USA.

 

His book "The Jack Passey Story" says it all and is a must read. God bless my friend. Sincere condolences to the family.

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No better place for it than the museum. We were speaking of Jack today at the shop. Ed

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Linus Tremaine, et al,

Well, I guess my special Santa was listening this year. I got the "For The Love Of Old Cars" book as well as Carl Pate's "Early Ford Encyclopedia"!

I have barely begun leafing through them, but I looked at the Duesenberg area for a few minutes. I found the Phaeton with the skirted front fenders pictured on page 75. I mis-remembered the years slightly on both it and the other J pictured on page 74. According to the book, they were both '31s (and the roadster I recalled was a convertible coupe!). (What can I say? I was still in college back then.)

 

I will spend many pleasant hours going through both books over the next few months. 

 

Merry Christmas to all!

W2

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