Jump to content

New Clive Cussler Novel Features Peerless


jeff_a
 Share

Recommended Posts

The 2015 book The Assassin is a an action/adventure historical novel taking place in the oilfields of Kansas and Oklahoma, New York, the Capitol, and Russia about the year 1905 and Peerless cars figure into the story(as does a Locomobile). Clive Cussler's many books often involve antique or Classic cars, such as the Dirk Pitt series, in which the hero fends off bad guys while driving cars like an L-29 Cord or a 1906 Stanley. This new one is from the Isaac Bell series with a private detective investigating problems in the oil business.

 

As many of you know, Mr. Cussler has a fine collection of antique & classic cars in the Cussler Museum in Arvada, Colorado(open May-September), with Auburn, Buick, Cadillac, Cord, Duesenberg, Hudson, Kaiser, Lincoln, Packard, Pierce-Arrow, Rolls-Royce, Stutz and other marques. No Peerless yet. To be fair, Peerlesses are rarer than those twelve marques (with the possible exception of Auburn and Stutz).

 

If you read this, Clive, I would be happy to talk with you about the Peerless cars and trucks still out there and what may be available. You may have a handle on that already, since you've been a car collector for some years.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And a wonderful collection it is, albeit stuck away semi-hidden in an industrial park!  Older stuff and Classics on one side of building, other side is mostly 50's convertibles....and everything pristine.....he has a great collection....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Dave,

When I mentioned the book I hadn't read it, but am now well into it. A Locomobile figured into the first chapter or two, but now 3 Peerlesses have appeared past the middle of the story. By odd coincidence, they are like the first car that drove into Salmon, Idaho in 1904: 4 cylinder, 24 h.p. Touring Cars. In the story, John D. Rockefeller owns the cars -- and a party of 5 are driving across parts of Russia in them, described as "...brand-new, rock-solid, Cleveland-built cars...able to run circles around Rolls-Royces." Where I'm at in the story, 2 detectives, 2 women, and JDR are trying to avoid bandits and other nogoodniks while driving from Baku on the Caspian Sea, to the Black Sea, with a belt-fed Maxim gun mounted in one of the Peerlesses.

 

The story is fiction of course, but Rockefeller did own Peerless cars, possibly as many as 6. If someone made a movie out of the book, it would be up there with Raiders of the Lost Ark...but lots more destruction. Cool that you've been to the museum.

 

Their site is: cusslermuseum.com and it has some good photography. I haven't been there yet. Last time I was driving through Arvada, they were closed. The books help pay for Clive Cussler's passion of antique car collecting. Old cars, as well as a certain amount of archeology, figure into a lot of the novels.  ---- Jeff

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Some natural elation is felt by the Peerless Company over the sale to John D. Rockefeller of a 40-hp. Peerless car. It has a limousine body, finished in deep crimson."

 

Automobile Topics, p. 1751, March 11, 1905

 

Same year the action takes place in the Clive Cussler novel mentioned above.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 years later...

Glad you liked this thread. There's a photo around of John D. Rockefeller riding in the back of a Peerless Touring Car(48-Six probably) out near his Cleveland estate in about 1914. I just sent a long technical letter to a chap in St. Louis who just bought a 1928 Peerless from a huge museum in South Dakota, and recommended he buy a copy of your Peerless book before the libraries find out about it and they sell out. I think he may know some of the St. Louis billionaires that have early Peerlesses.

 

Don't ever think of them as billionaire's cars, since only 8 or 9 have been owners! All the rest of the 1 or 2 hundred thousand owners are sub-billionaires, mere peasants by comparison.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...