rockinroads

Wanted to Buy: 1996 Buick Roadmaster Estate

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G'day from Australia!

 

I'm looking to buy a 1996 Buick Roadmaster Estate so I thought I'd try the AACA Forum to see what it might turn up. Given my distance from the USA, I will obviously need to ship it over here and therefore, I'm after a very nice example as I don't want to have to do this more than once, nor shell out thousands in shipping costs alone just to get replacement parts sent over here. So, I'm hoping someone out there has one for sale or knows of one they could let me know about! I am flexible on the color of the car and fitted accessories but the following are must haves:

 

Exterior woodgrain trim

Low mileage

Leather interior

Tow package/grand touring suspension

 

I already have finance for a purchase and will work closely with the seller to ensure that full payment reaches them before the car leaves their driveway. I'm not a tyre kicker and do not want to waste anyone's time. I have wanted a 1996 RMW for a long time but distance has always been a barrier to feeling confident enough to buy one from the USA. I may therefore use an inspection referral service such as the one offered by www.cars-on-line.com to carry out an inspection before I commit to buying anything because naturally, I need to know that the car you're selling is the one I'm after.

 

So, if you're ready to sell your loved 1996 Roadmaster wagon, I might be the buyer you're looking for!

 

You can e-mail me here: rockinroads@hotmail.com

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

Edited by rockinroads (see edit history)

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G'day from Australia!

 

I'm looking to buy a 1996 Buick Roadmaster Estate so I thought I'd try the AACA Forum to see what it might turn up. Given my distance from the USA, I will obviously need to ship it over here and therefore,

<snip>

Given it will be left hand drive how do expect to drive it on Aussie roads?

2015-1996 = 15 years old car

I am very sceptical of post 1.

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Given it will be left hand drive how do expect to drive it on Aussie roads?

2015-1996 = 15 years old car

I am very sceptical of post 1.

 

Hi mate, yes we do drive on the other side of the road in Australia and our steering wheels are on the right hand side of the car. There are two options for owners of left hand drive cars out here. Either leave them as they are or have them converted from left hand drive to right hand drive. There are plenty of companies who offer that service but it's not cheap... it would be about $7,500 in your money. I have driven left hand drive cars here before and it's not all that hard once you get used to the size of your car. 

 

I had a feeling people would view my post with skepticism given the amount of fraud that goes on these days so perhaps I wont get any help from anyone on here. I don't know what else I can do to prove that I'm fairdinkum (that's Australian for honest) but I'm not giving up my search! I e-mailed Midwest Auto Collection last week about a 1996 RMW they had on their website but it had already been sold to a dealer in North Carolina. They did say they would let me know if any others come up though. There is simply no other way for me to buy one of these cars as they were never sold in Australia and as far as I know, no one has ever imported one. There are plenty of classic American cars out here (and newer ones too) and I have owned three Buicks in my time - one 1958 Buick Roadmaster, one 1966 Buick Skylark and one 1973 Buick Electra - but I am a married man now and have none! Now that I have started my own family, I really want a station wagon and this is the wagon I want! 

 

By the way, all cars made in 1996 are now 19 years old, not 15. So it's back to school for you and back to the search for me before the Australian dollar plunges any further and this dream becomes an impossibility!

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

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Glen, I can tell you're a legitimate car enthusiast.

Nigerian or Russian criminals don't write well,

don't post their pictures, and somehow one can tell they

are not honest.

 

I have noticed that many, many Roadmaster wagons

have 100,000 miles on them, and the low-mileage wagons

are seldom seen.  Roadmasters are the opposite of 1977-79

Lincolns and 1976 Cadillac convertibles, where low-mileage

examples can be found any day.  Since station wagons are

not being made in America any more, Roadmaster wagons

are among the very few cars of the 1990's that are already

collectible, though I myself never see them at shows. 

 

Speaking for myself, if you get a nice low-mileage example,

I hope you'll keep the mileage low, not drive it for daily use, 

and not alter it to right-hand drive.  We like to see cars

preserved for future generations!

 

All the best to you in your search!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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Glen, I can tell you're a legitimate car enthusiast.

Nigerian or Russian criminals don't write well,

don't post their pictures, and somehow one can tell they

are not honest.

 

I have noticed that many, many Roadmaster wagons

have 100,000 miles on them, and the low-mileage wagons

are seldom seen.  Roadmasters are the opposite of 1977-79

Lincolns and 1976 Cadillac convertibles, where low-mileage

examples can be found any day.  Since station wagons are

not being made in America any more, Roadmaster wagons

are among the very few cars of the 1990's that are already

collectible, though I myself never see them at shows. 

 

Speaking for myself, if you get a nice low-mileage example,

I hope you'll keep the mileage low, not drive it for daily use, 

and not alter it to right-hand drive.  We like to see cars

preserved for future generations!

 

All the best to you in your search!

Hi John,

 

Thanks for your post!! Yes I will definitely keep the car left hand drive. I'm not one for needless modifications and I certainly appreciate original cars in factory spec condition. You're right in that lower mileage Roadmaster wagons are hard to find now and on this 'must have' I might have to give ground. I don't drive a car daily as I catch the train to work and even if I did drive to work, I wouldn't be driving a V8! Fuel is a lot more expensive here than it is in the US. No this would be a seldom used car and one that I would want to improve and care for so that it is there for future generations.

 

We're still making rear wheel drive station wagons in Australia but not for long. After 2017 we wont even be making cars anymore. The entire auto industry here is about to vanish with Toyota, Holden and Ford moving their manufacturing overseas. I hope station wagons make a comeback in the US someday... there's nothing quite like a big American wagon!

 

Speaking of Nigerian scammers, I had one of them try to take me for $5,000 once when I was selling my 1966 Skylark. He even sent me a fake cheque!! He had purported to be from the UK but when the cheque turned up in an envelope with Nigerian stamps, it gave the game away. I copied the content of his e-mails into a Google search and bang - there they were almost word for word on scam alert websites. So I decided to play along for a while just to waste his time and after a few weeks I thanked him for the fun and told him to piss off! It's great fun playing them at their own game!

 

If I do manage to buy a Roadmaster wagon, I will post some pictures on here with Sydney harbour in the background.

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

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Glen,

My Daughter lives in Perth(met a guy when student teaching a couple years ago) We visited Perth and Sydney last year. Met great Packard collector in your fair city which was the best part of my trip. But to your topic, I also am kinda looking for a 90's Roadmaster sedan or wagon but with the tow package. See some rough ones every day on the way to work in Cincinnati. However, last week on business I saw a very nice maroon 94 limited Sedan with 67000 miles in Minerva, Ohio near Canton for sale. Arranged to see under the hood and drive the car. While it had the 5.7 engine, it did not have the mechanical fan thus no tow pack. I took it for spin anyway and drove well. New tires, brakes and alt according to the second owner who says it was always garaged. It is very clean with no visible rust. As I was not really interested I did not do a close inspection. He said everything worked but I did find the rear left power window did not work in my 10 min joy ride. Let me know if you can live with a sedan via a pm as I have contact info and maybe a picture on my phone.

Regards,

Tom Muth

Cincinnati, Ohio

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I am the technical adviser for the BCA on Roadmasters from 1991 to 1996. You are making a good choice for a very durable half million miles car.

 

Subscribe to this forum: http://www.impalassforum.com/

 

It has a section for Roadmasters and a Buy/Sell section. The Impala SS is pretty much the same car. I had two 1994 Roadmaster sedans that gave themselves up to the New York State road salt. The third of the breed that I bought is an Impala and I bought  a really good one for $9,000. This one is illegible and licensed as an antique car and is kept in a heated garage for the long term. A RM wagon should be $6,000 to $10,000 for the better examples. Be careful about paying less.

 

The last RM sedan I had could get 28 MPG US if you kept your foot out of it. As an automotive design for comfort and durability you really can't make a better choice. It is probably worth the steering conversion.

 

Oh, I may be able to dig around and find some 1969 pictures of my ship, the USS Arlington AGMR-2 in Sydney harbor, a little different kind of boat (don't confuse it with and AGER, I know nothing.)

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

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Glen, you might also look for the 1977-79 and 1980-90

Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, and Buick station wagons,

the predecessors to the Buick you mention.  Low mileage

examples are equally scarce, but it might widen your search

if you like their boxier styling.  I think they look excellent.

 

Is there any reason you are specifically requesting a 1996

Roadmaster wagon, when that same styling was virtually

unchanged from 1991 forward?  Specifying a single year

may make the search even more challenging.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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Glen, you might also look for the 1977-79 and 1980-90

Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, and Buick station wagons,

the predecessors to the Buick you mention.  Low mileage

examples are equally scarce, but it might widen your search

if you like their boxier styling.  I think they look excellent.

 

Is there any reason you are specifically requesting a 1996

Roadmaster wagon, when that same styling was virtually

unchanged from 1991 forward?  Specifying a single year

may make the search even more challenging.

Hi John,

 

I'm not a fan of the earlier boxier models but I do also like the 1970 Buick Estate wagon. I narrowly missed out on an excellent example on ebay recently. Seamist green, rally wheels, vinyl roof... it was perfect!!! Anyway, it wasn't to be.

 

Although the styling is virtually the same across the '91 through '96 RMW's, there were several technical and mechanical improvements as the years rolled on. Here's a minor summary I found on wikipedia:

 

  • 1992: A four-door sedan joined the Roadmaster wagon as an early 1992 model. The 5.7 L 180 hp TBI (Throttle-Body Injection) V8 engine replaced the 5.0 L.
  • 1993: Window lockout feature and the addition of a new spoke wheel cover mid-year.
  • 1994: A redesigned dashboard included a new instrument cluster, with climate controls mounted higher and a knee bolster below. Dual airbags were also installed. The 5.7 L TBI LO5 is replaced with a 5.7L MPFI LT1. This LT1 had cast-iron cylinder heads and produced 260 hp (194 kW) (40 less horsepower than the Corvette). A new electronically controlled 4L60E four-speed automatic transmission replaces the 4L60 (aka 700R4).
  • 1995: Only a handful of minor changes were made to 1995 models, including long-life automatic-transmission fluid. Larger, foldaway style mirrors were installed as well, and radios received bigger controls. Sedans wore new bodyside moldings, while Estate wagons added a shade for the "Vista Roof" as well as a cargo cover. Heated seats also became an option.
  • 1996: Final year. Engine coolant could last 5 years or 100,000 miles (160,934 km), and automatic climate control became standard. General Motors also updated the on-board diagnostic system (OBD I to OBD II). The Roadmaster Estate Wagon and the Chevrolet Caprice wagon would be the last American full-size station wagons.

So the 1996 model is the best of the bunch and therefore the one to buy. It was also unfortunately the one they made fewest of, with only 22,939 leaving the factory, down from the high of 85,309 made in 1992. I'm used to challenging searches... I used to own a 1958 Roadmaster!! Finding parts for that was a nightmare in the days before the internet! I have attached a picture of me and the '58 taken about 20 years ago.

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

post-154161-0-21015200-1437523859_thumb.

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Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. If you don't find the car in the condition that you seek and want to consider a project car, I recently saw this on craigslist. It is cheap and ugly but possibly has potential for you as a project car.

 

http://wilmington.craigslist.org/cto/5111775142.html

I hope it doesn't come to that! I don't have the time or space to deal with another project! Perhaps when I retire in about 30 years from now and have all the time I need I might take on a project then. Right now it's full time work, nappies, bottles and interrupted sleep!

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I looked at a long-term chart of the Australian dollar

versus the American dollar, since Australia left the

pence-shilling-florin-crown-pound sterling system.

For many years, the Aus. $ was worth about 70 to 80 

American cents.  It was just in very recent years, with the

weakness of the American economy and low interest rates,

that the Australian dollar climbed to unusual levels.  Or

perhaps more accurately, it was the American dollar that fell.

 

So don't feel bad, Glen, if prices here seem to be rising for you.

The currencies just seem to be getting back to a long-term norm.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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I am the technical adviser for the BCA on Roadmasters from 1991 to 1996. You are making a good choice for a very durable half million miles car.

 

Subscribe to this forum: http://www.impalassforum.com/

 

It has a section for Roadmasters and a Buy/Sell section. The Impala SS is pretty much the same car. I had two 1994 Roadmaster sedans that gave themselves up to the New York State road salt. The third of the breed that I bought is an Impala and I bought  a really good one for $9,000. This one is illegible and licensed as an antique car and is kept in a heated garage for the long term. A RM wagon should be $6,000 to $10,000 for the better examples. Be careful about paying less.

 

The last RM sedan I had could get 28 MPG US if you kept your foot out of it. As an automotive design for comfort and durability you really can't make a better choice. It is probably worth the steering conversion.

 

Oh, I may be able to dig around and find some 1969 pictures of my ship, the USS Arlington AGMR-2 in Sydney harbor, a little different kind of boat (don't confuse it with and AGER, I know nothing.)

Bernie

G'day Bernie,

 

Thanks for writing to me.

 

If you're the technical advisor for the BCA on '91 through '96 Roadmasters then you might also be my new best friend! No doubt I will have problems that will baffle me until I get to know the car better so it's nice to know there are people out there who might be able to help.

 

The last 1996 Roadmaster I found that ticked all the boxes was advertised for $12,995 at MidWest Auto Collection. It had 67K miles and the ad is still up so you should be able to see it here: http://www.midwestautocollection.com/web/used/Buick-ROADMASTER-ESTATE-COLLECTORS-EDITION-1996-Addison-Illinois/20481586/

 

I did enquire about this car but apparently it has already been sold. The asking price was a little too high for me so I made an offer of $10,000 but he said RMW's for that price normally have around 100K miles. Midwest also currently have a 1994 RMW with 43K miles... they're asking $17,995 for that!!

 

Lastly, I would love to see pictures of the Arlington in Sydney Harbour if you can dig up those photos! I work for the City of Sydney and I'm sure our Archives unit would be fascinated too.

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

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American old-car dealers often ask higher prices than others--

sometimes double what hobbyists would consider reasonable,

and double what they just paid for the car.

Big dealers would be better able to coordinate overseas shipping

for you, but you would be paying for the convenience.  Arrange shipping

yourself, and you wouldn't be beholden to their high mark-ups.

 

My observation is that the high-priced dealers--unlike hobbyists--

hold onto their high advertised prices like grim death, hoping 

someone like you will come along.  But after many months, they

quietly sell it on Ebay or elsewhere for a better price, and never

tell anyone.  If they revealed that the "$18,000" car sold for $12,000,

then they couldn't ask an unreasonable $18,000 for the next one they got.

If you can deal directly with a sincere individual, you should pay less.

 

I have seen Roadmaster Estate Wagons with 100,000 miles

advertised for $5000, so don't accept the dealer's pricing statements.  

In our AACA regional newsletter 3 years ago, a 1996 Buick wagon

with 96,000 miles was locally advertised for $5000.  It was or is in

Pennsylvania, and if that interests you, I could call to see whether

it is still around.  I don't know anything about the car otherwise.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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I looked at a long-term chart of the Australian dollar

versus the American dollar, since Australia left the

pence-shilling-florin-crown-pound sterling system.

For many years, the Aus. $ was worth about 70 to 80 

American cents.  It was just in very recent years, with the

weakness of the American economy and low interest rates,

that the Australian dollar climbed to unusual levels.  Or

perhaps more accurately, it was the American dollar that fell.

 

So don't feel bad, Glen, if prices here seem to be rising for you.

The currencies just seem to be getting back to a long-term norm.

Yes you're right, they are getting back to a long term norm. I really should have done this about 3 years ago when one Aus dollar was buying US $1.10. At 73c now, I have to add 27% to every price tag. It's going to keep going down from here to as low as 50 to 60 US cents. I'd like to get in before that happens!

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American old-car dealers often ask higher prices than others--

sometimes double what hobbyists would consider reasonable,

and double what they just paid for the car.

Big dealers would be better able to coordinate overseas shipping

for you, but you would be paying for the convenience.  Arrange shipping

yourself, and you wouldn't be beholden to their high mark-ups.

 

My observation is that the high-priced dealers--unlike hobbyists--

hold onto their high advertised prices like grim death, hoping 

someone like you will come along.  But after many months, they

quietly sell it on Ebay or elsewhere for a better price, and never

tell anyone.  If they revealed that the "$18,000" car sold for $12,000,

then they couldn't ask an unreasonable $18,000 for the next one they got.

If you can deal directly with a sincere individual, you should pay less.

 

I have seen Roadmaster Estate Wagons with 100,000 miles

advertised for $5000, so don't accept the dealer's pricing statements.  

In our AACA regional newsletter 3 years ago, a 1996 Buick wagon

with 96,000 miles was locally advertised for $5000.  It was or is in

Pennsylvania, and if that interests you, I could call to see whether

it is still around.  I don't know anything about the car otherwise.

Hello again John,

 

Yes you're right, dealers typically mark their cars up more than an individual seller. I have certainly noticed that the wagons available through dealers are generally more expensive but usually also in better condition and better presented. Still, I would rather buy from an individual seller to avoid dealer mark ups. I will definitely be arranging shipping myself and have already made enquiries in that regard. The best quote I have found so far is $1,875 although I'm sure that wouldn't include other hidden costs.

 

I very much doubt that the RMW advertised some 3 years ago would still be available... but I guess there's no harm in trying. If you do get a chance, please do ask. I don't want to put you out though so don't go through too much trouble!

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

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I called the owner of the Roadmaster wagon.  It sold only

in November 2014, almost 2 years after it was advertised

in our newsletter.  The daughter of the now-deceased owner

said it was "really nice," and had been admired at a Carlisle show

they took it to.  Because they were eager to sell it after

her father's passing, It sold for $3000.

 

It's really a buyer's market for most cars here in the U. S.,

and if a car is optimistically priced, you can call an owner a year

or more later and it's likely still for sale.  A private owner will

likely be more flexible, but a dealer will probably still quote

his high price.  So get out your 2013 and 2014 Hemmings Motor News magazines!

 

The woman will look up the name of the man who bought it,

who lives in central Pennsylvania. He has other Roadmasters,

she said.  Maybe it would be for sale again.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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Here's an Ebay link to a 1994 Estate Wagon with 

a stated 30,000 miles.  It was bid up to $12,000 and

did not sell at that price.  I realize it's not a 1996, but

it is on the U. S. West Coast, which would make 

shipping easier for you:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1994-Buick-Roadmaster-/151695038652?

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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1994-1996 used the LT1 engine (not a Corvette) with reverse cooling. That is the one to pick. The cooled water from the radiator enters the engine through the heads. This allows a higher compression ratio and more advance. That gives it the 260 HP rating. The heated water travels to the block where the stable warmer temperatures help give long life to the cylinders. Most of the cars still run well today.

A 100,000 mile car in good condition today would have been used and maintained moderately. A 60,000 mile car would have been sitting around and possibly used for short trips that are what I like to call benevolent neglect. A really clean 100-125K car would be the least risky. I bought my Impala in 2011 with 86,000 miles on it. I just turned 93,000 last Friday. I don't drive it as much as I should, but when I do I always try to drive 30 miles, Friday I went 250.

 

Members of that Impala SS club whom own Roadmasters would be the best source. They baby their cars, for the most part, and spend money on them to keep them in top shape. Look for one from a collector, but not a hoarder.

 

Keep an eye on Ebay "sold" prices. That is a good indicator. Asking prices are just asking prices.

 

Here are the questions and desirable answers:

1. How long have you owned the car? More than two years.

 

2. Is the car licensed and insured in your name now? Yes.

 

3. Could we take it for a drive today? Yes

 

4. Have you done any major work since you owned it? (All cars need something. If they proudly say "Nothing" you get to do what they didn't.

 

5. If you were to keep this car what would you like to do if you had some extra money? (Again, if they have intimate knowledge of the car something, a carpet, touch up, tires, some modest repair should come to mind.) It will give you an indication of how anal they are about maintaining the car.

 

Oh, dealers do mark their cars up. If they make a profit and are incorporated they have to split it with the US government. If they have employees they have fixed percentage amounts to pay in tax, benefits, and unemployment insurance. There are a lot of expenses added that an individual selling a car doesn't bare. A car from either a dealer or individual is fine if you do your homework. Just expect to pay the dealer a little more. They might still be in business if you need them again.

Bernie

 

Good cars sell fast. Good luck.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

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I have been looking for one as well. Be patient. They're out there.

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I have been looking for one as well. Be patient. They're out there.

Well I'm definitely a patient man... it's just the Australian dollar that worries me! If it keeps falling I'll be priced out until it recovers again. It might not plunge to depths predicted - it just depends on a number of factors. if it does go into free fall though, I'll need to be a little more patient than I already am!

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Glen, you probably shouldn't be overly concerned

about the Australian dollar's value in the future.

Wise investors realize that the "experts" cannot

predict the future, whether in stock markets, currencies,

or anything else.  The experts really have no idea,

though they always give it a shot.

 

One especially wise commentator wryly noted that

American economists "have successfully predicted

ten out of the last five recessions!"  In fact, the human

tendency is to see a past trend, and extrapolate it

indefinitely into the future, which is probably what your

concern of a 50-cent Australian dollar is based on.

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G'day to you all in the USA!

 

Well, it looks like my search is over. I literally cannot import ANY Buick made after 1989!! Only cars included in the Australian Government's Specialist and Enthusiast Vehicle Scheme (SEVS) can be imported into Australia if they were made after 1989. If you want to see the list, here it is: http://rvcs-prodweb.dot.gov.au/sevs/sevsindex.htm

 

1989 is a moving date so next year it will be 1990, then 1991 and so on. So, when 2021 rolls around, I will be able to import a 1996 Buick Roadmaster Estate. Even then however, the car will need to be converted to right hand drive. The only way to get around that is to wait until 2026 (or 30 years after manufacture) and then I can leave the car as is. 

 

So!! I will be back in 11 years to resume my search!! In the meantime, I will start a new thread in search of another car made well before 1985 so I can keep it 100% original!

 

Bloody rules!!!

 

I'd like to thank everyone on this forum for all of your help and kindness so far. I have met some wonderful people on here and you have been very generous with your time and assistance.

 

Cheers,

 

Glen Camenzuli

 

 

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Maybe some forthcoming change in legislation will shorten

your wait, Glen.

 

Car-collecting lobbyists should tell the Australian government

that collector cars can be under 30 years old.  They should

develop some sort of registration for "classics" that limit their

use and mileage, but still allow an under-30 car to be imported

without meeting current government rules.

 

Our own forefathers formed our country so we would have

a government that served us, not ruled us!  But it's easy

for government workers to forget that ideal.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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Glen, do you like the General Motors station wagons
from 1971 to 1976?  They had a novel "disappearing tailgate,"
in which the window glass retracted up into the roof,
and the lower half of the tailgate could be lowered down
into the body.  (Some lowered by hand, but electric
operation was an option.)
 
I know you mentioned 1970 Buick wagons, but the 1971-76
wagons have this interesting feature that will amuse your
family and onlookers at shows!  I live in an active antique-car

area, but I have not yet seen one of these at shows.

 

Please see picture attached.

post-91841-0-58394200-1438002082_thumb.j

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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