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West Peterson

Antique Automobile magazine July/August issue

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Many of you are starting to get your July/August issue. Just to let you know, we are fully aware of the caption problem on page 61 and 56. It is not a case of us (ME, only, really) not knowing the makes of cars and/or years, as the captions aren't even close to being era correct, let alone marque correct.

 

It's just a plain super-large screw-up on my part. It also cannot be blamed on proofreaders, as those two pages were not seen by the proofreaders. I am mainly sorry for those members whose photo captions were completely messed up, and the Kansas City Region (who worked so hard to put on an extremely well organized event).

 

My apologies. We'll correct this, somehow, in the next issue.

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West, got mine today, and yes there are some minor problems but, sheesh, you guys are doing great work.  Beautiful magazine, and we can live with a few mislabeled cars, since we all know better!  Of course, people want their name associated with the picture, and I'm sure they'll understand.

 

Getting more and more advertising, full page, and I'm sure that helps pay for the great paper and pictures, but it's distracting.  I'd be happy with fewer adds and more content, even in black and white.  Just my opinion, but the almighty dollar has really messed up a lot of antique car magazines, and don't want to see that happen, since you and your crew are doing such a great job with content.......

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Yes, West, don't flagellate yourself.  The magazine

remains excellent.  

 

David, I'd say, in my opinion, the number of ads remains

pretty modest throughout the body of the magazine,

and they aren't distracting.  As car enthusiasts,

we are actually likely to look at most car-related ads!

 

Some big glossy magazines on other subjects are

so overstuffed with ads that the reader has to search hard

between advertisements actually to locate the articles.

 I've seen some "prestigious" magazines so full of sultry

"glamour" ads that the Table of Contents is frustratingly

located on page 20 or so!

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As the editor of the Ohio Region CCCA magazine, I think West might be engaging in some pre-emptive damage control. My experience suggests that his E-mail box is about to fill with dozens, perhaps even hundreds of E-mails from people telling him about the mistake. Some will be helpful, some will be irate, some will be rude, some will act like they've discovered cold fusion, but they're all going to be pointing out the error.

 

I continue to think that the AACA magazine is the finest club publication of any I currently receive. I aspire to make our own publication as nice and have often drawn inspiration from West's work. Don't let a mistake get you down, West, a vast majority of the club is behind you, loves your work, and doesn't care about a mistake that was so obviously a mistake and not ignorance. Thank you for all your hard work.

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Every person on this site makes mistakes on a regular basis so forget about your small mistakes and celebrate your excellent track record ! You are a true professional that is to be commended. Keep up the great work! Wayne

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West, I think you do a great job, but I also think there are too many ads in the body of the magazine.  Can we have the ads at the beginning or at the end? I know I'm getting older, but the size of the print in the reader ads at the back is starting to look like Hemmings Motor News.  Would it take that much extra space to make the text a little larger.  Just sayin...

 

Frank

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Think you should make it into the largest mystery car contest ever for one magazine and let it go on its own.  Lots of fun identifying the cars.   Keeps us on our toes.

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West, you shouldn't have tipped everyone off - don't you do things like this periodically just as a "test" to see who is reading? 

Really, tho, you're entitled to a mulligan every so often, and as always, what an amazing publication.  Thanks for all the hard work making AA the premier publication of it's kind.  Wish we had a bit more time during the Va Beach meet to get together.  Don't forget to let us know when you are back in town to take pics at Bob's Chevy emporium.   You'll need to look at a Model T after all those bowties!

Terry

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West,

Don't beat yourself up over this.   Everyone is entitled to make an occasional mistake.   Bottom line is that you produce a fantastic magazine that is enjoyed by our members.   I look forward to every issue.

By the way, I recieved my July/August issue yesterday, July 16th.

Thanks for a beautiful magazine.

Rog

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Well, I guess I'm late getting to this party because I've been on the road, and the Louisville Meet was extremely well produced and managed - kudos to Fred Trusty and his entire group of committees, and all the members of KYANA Region.

 

West's ongoing and amazing performance with our ANTIQUE AUTOMOBILE speaks for itself, and we certainly have the hobby's premier publication, thanks to his efforts. 

 

We know what the cars in the photos really are, and some of us even know who the owners really are. As for the captions - we would certainly recognize that those cars were possibly also scheduled for inclusion, and we can appreciate that sometimes our own cars are the victim of lack of space.

 

West, thank you for your continued efforts.

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Hi West, 

   I got my Antique Automobile Sat. the 18th. When I thumbed through it did not find any typos. Had to read about it here before I noticed them. Remember, those upside down airplane stamps they made a century ago are ultra-desirable now. Some magazine did a story about prominent collector Ele Chesney's cars and captioned the only full-page color picture "1934 Packard V-12 Convertible Victoria", a car she has, only it was her 1931 Peerless Limousine. Now that it's been a decade, it makes a good Rodney Dangerfield story, about  how Packards get a smidge more press than Peerless.

   Jeff

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West;

       Please don't trouble yourself over a minor problem.   I appreciate the upgrade on my Crosleys!!!  Given the outstanding body of work you have done, this is insignificant!!! 

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You guys are letting him off easy! The boss is hammering him! :) Glad you are not being incensed but trust me some people will feel that the ultimate sin has been made and will castigate him (us) unmercifully!

We do have a limit on our ads but sometimes based on conditions and the number of regions that need ads we go over. We are well aware of making sure we have an appropriate number of ads versus articles and will continue to review that subject. However, we are greatly appreciative that our magazine has the value it does to advertisers. We cannot do what we do without their support.

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Consider you must allow it to be in to the most significant secret car or truck contest at any time for one mag in addition to neglected without attention. Many enjoyable figuring out this cars. Will keep all of us on our own toes and fingers.

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Also in the newest issue of Antique Automobile is article by West Peterson telling “How Not to Treat a Packard”. Apparently Patty Packard (His 1940 Packard)can be a problem child. In his story of taking a 115 mile trip the get help in diagnosing an overdrive noise, Patty Packard opened her rear door at highway speed.

That's story I can empathize with. On the 1998 Glidden Tour in Bretton Woods NH, a late start and an early AM gas stop in our 1934 Ford Tudor (With suicide doors), haste got us moving without a fully latched drivers door. As I shifted into 3rd gear at about 50 MPH, BOOM! The drivers door opened, snapping the safety strap and slamming the left rear fender. Thankfully, I thought not to grab it or it might have ripped my seat belt anchors out of the floor, ejecting me into on coming traffic.

The bent hinges would only let the door close to about 8” of latching, leaving us with an open air scoop on the left side of the car. My belt was re-purposed to hold the door to the windshield pillar and we were off again to the next open garage. A bright old timer got a crow bar and inserted it into the

opened door hinge and we repeatedly closed the door on the crow bar that bent the hinges enough to get the door closed & belted.

Now were were ½ hour later than our late start on a day that was to take us by back roads to Center

Harbor NH on Lake Winnipesaukee for a steam ship ride on the M/S Mount Washington to Wolfeboro.

A quick look a the map and we choose to make up time via the 3 lane Interstate 91 instead of following the tour route. With my belt holding the door tight, we found out why Bonnie & Clyde liked the 34 Fords so much. We flew past the “Old Man on the Mountain” so fast that his face fell of not long after that.

As we arrived in Center Harbor, the M/S Mount Washington was blowing her whistle and the gangplank was removed as soon as we boarded. The rest of the tour was un-eventful except for running out of gas once and getting to meet 4 lovely AACA folks in a 28 Chrysler who made a U-turn to rescue us.

Did this sour us on touring? Heck NO, we still do every tour we can find, knowing these old cars can be fixed and keep going even when we were 1500 miles from home..

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I am not soured on touring at all, either. In fact, the car is home now and I'm making plans to drive it back to Hershey in October, and to New Orleans in November.

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