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1965 Galaxy 500 Conv


Restorer32

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We've been asked by a friend to value her late husband's '65 Galaxy 500 Convertible. 352 engine. Car is in #3 condition. Decent repaint some years ago, no rust to speak of. In dry storage since '97. Very nice original interior. No idea when it was last driven or even run. Does anyone have a copy of Old Cars Price Guide handy? We don't normally get involved in valuing cars but would like to help her out. She has no illusions about the car's value.

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There are other sources and price guides other than OCW. Here are a few I use:

 

From www.collectorcarmarket.com:

 

1965 Galaxie 2dr Convertible

  #5      #4   #3          #2    #1

1375 4300 9175 13625 21425

 

 

From http://www.nadaguides.com/Classic-Cars:

 

MSRP      Low Retail     Average Retail       High Retail

$2,996       $4,850             $14,400              $23,300

 

Hagerty has value tools at https://www.hagerty.com/valuationtools/HVT/VehicleSearchbut they don't always have all the model years, as is the case with a 1965 Galaxie.

 

I'd say a value of $10,000 would be about right for a driver-grade car that may or may not need work. The price guides rarely agree, but at least they'll give your "gut" some backup.

 

Hope this helps!

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Had a chance to buy a decent one with really no rust last year but had been off the road for quite some time.  It really needed paint  and a top though.  I think they tried for some time to sell it for 4000-5000.

These are some of those cars that just don't have much following.  I found a few examples turnkey that looked nice being sold/advertised for around 10,000 at that time and they weren't moving.  I would say check ebay and see what actually is selling.  A very nice 64 just went through ebay White red interior all new top with a buy it now of 15,000 and the bidding was at a standstill at the end at 12,000.  They are alot more desirable. 

  I would say 6500-8500 depending on what it really needs to get it up and running and how Nice the chrome is in and out. 

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It will clean up to a nice driver. Interior is very nice. Has a new but old top that still looks fine. Chrome is not bad. She says she might keep it. Thanks for the help. We make it a point not to value potential customer's cars to avoid the inevitable "but you told me if we restored it it would be worth X ", but in this case I'm just helping out a family friend.

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  I would say 6500-8500 depending on what it really needs to get it up and running and how Nice the chrome is in and out. 

 

This is a lot closer to reality.  The old car price guides are based on a limited number of high dollar auctions and thus their values skew high (and usually aren't based on a statistically valid sample size).  I like to check completed auctions on ebay, where cash actually changes hands (USUALLY, but that's a different topic for a different post...).  In any case, driver-quality 1965 convertibles with 352 seem to be selling in the $5,000-$7,000 range in the last year.

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Old Car Price Guide says $8550. Incidentally if it is not running and driving it is not a #3. You should budget $2000 or maybe more for new battery, new tires, clean or replace gas tank, new brakes etc. or reduce the price accordingly. Depending how long it has been out of commission.

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I think at min get it running. Many folks will over pay for the dream and not mind putting tires on even if you have to jump start it. But your new the hobby folks want something to drives up the trailer for max payment.

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My experience says that having it running and driving will be the key to selling it. You'll have to discount it more than the cost of repairs to get it sold, probably a lot more. Most buyers don't have much "vision" for a car with needs and they probably won't take any seller's word for it that it "just needs a tune up," or something like that. All they'll see is a non-running car with an unknown black hole of costs in its future. There are too many other cars out there that do run and drive competing for their money. A non-runner is VERY hard to sell.

 

Getting it running will pay for itself in terms of how much you'll get for the car and you'll sell it that much faster, too. No run = no sale.

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We are calling it a #3 assuming we get it running and reliable first. The lady is not even sure she wants to sell it. She wants to get it up and running and maybe drive it a bit and take it to a few local cruise ins before she makes that decision. We'll post pics after we pull it out of storage and clean it up.

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I looked at one of those "urban legend" cars once. The widow had a price based on everything one could see without bending over. I had a copy of Hemmings Motor News in my car. So I showed her the section with appraisal services and recommended one in a nearby city.

I left the magazine with her but she seemed to think $250-$300 was an extremely high price to evaluate her $30,000 car

 

Her deceased brother who did the expert maintenance on the car was one of those guys who doesn't cut the end off tie wraps.

 

My wife has a list of prices she should get for all my stuff. Believe me it's a lot cheaper than my living price. If you hear about me dying call her quick!

Bernie

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