dibarlaw

1937-248 Overheating

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Dave, that is not the way this stuff works. You fill the entire cooling system or the block and radiator individually and just let it set. I spoke with

the technical department at Evapo-Rust and that was the instructions from their lips to my ears - let it set. The longer the better for severe rust and

repeated applications if necessary once the solution turns black.

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Larry,

 

It looks like a lot of work and money but it sounds like you're finally getting to the root of this overheating issue. Anyway I sure hope so. My car overheated for years while I chased different solutions. It sure felt good when I finally got it solved. As I've said before there ain't much farfegnugen in Buickville when the car is overheating all the time.

 

Dave

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After reading this thread one thing comes to mind.  NO ONE has mentioned the by-pass valve on the thermostat housing.   READ the shop manual.  If 73 years of age has not yet rusted the spring in there to the failing stage, it will soon fail.  This is the valve that lets water go from the cylinder head straight to the water pump  (the 1 7/8" hose that goes between the head and the water pump) if it fails or gets weak. It is located below the thermostat and is part of the thermostat housing.  The water never sees the radiator! Its well worth checking this part out!. 

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I attended to the by-pass valve before I even tried to drive to Springfield. I consulted my old  37-38 Torque Tube magazines from the early 90s about how they were to preform and how to check. I was thinking that if it was removed it may be contributing to the engine running hot (usually 185 degrees). When I opened up the thermostat housing the valve was there and all was in good shape, just needed removed and cleaned up. The spring had good tension and appeared solid.(the rest of the pieces were brass). Again, my most serious problem was the plugged radiator.

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post-121302-0-64341600-1437853262_thumb.post-121302-0-36743200-1437853292_thumb.post-121302-0-61170600-1437853321_thumb.post-121302-0-73356500-1437853348_thumb.I had flushed out the block after the 2nd treatment of the EVAPO RUST, with about 10 gallons of water at hose pressure. All came out clean but the water had the same yellow green tint as the ER. Yesterday the radiator was plumbed in. I ran the engine for 40 minutes at idle and it seemed to not go above 170 on the gage.

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post-121302-0-27214200-1437853893_thumb. Yesterday I reinstalled the re-cored radiator. I had to clean up the sides and mounting area and did some touch up. When the shop put in my new wiring harness apparently they already replaced the radiator and routed the wires on the engine side over top of the radiator. So while the radiator was out I took the opportunity to route the harness correctly to the front side of the frame where the clips are. Made for a much neater appearance.Today I took the 37 out for about a 10 mile drive. 85 degree day here. Just doing weekend errands. Stop and go in traffic pulled some grades on route 30 west of Chambersburg. Had it at 50 mph for a time and my temp gage stayed around 160 through all conditions. Even after hot shut down the temp did not go above 180 degrees. The Gano filter did already pick up some stuff. Hope this is the final solution to the problem.

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Congratulations, Larry!

 

Wow, that was a lot of work to get your '37-41 back to running in the normal operating temperature range. Looks like you have finally got it nailed.  Over heating issues are no fun. Been there myself. 

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Good job Larry! I think you've got licked this time. Let the good times roll Rollin' down the the road in a 37 Buick. :)

Dave

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Larry and Joan,I hope you can use your 37 Buick as you always have wanted to do.

Sorry to say Larry but the wheather are still really bad here in Sweden,rain almost every day.The badest summer ever what I can remember.Yesterday we was on a "swap meet"in Rättvik Dalarna.Our oldest soon and his fiance on the picture,he was selling some car parts.

Leif in Sweden.

post-76677-0-51473000-1437909050_thumb.j

Edited by Leif Holmberg (see edit history)

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Leif: :

 We hope we will be driving the 37 to Tennessee in September for a 1936-1938 Tour. I still have to change the manifold gaskets. I wanted to make sure I had the overheating problem solved before I did the manifold.
Our weather in Pennsylvania has been the best in some years. But it is promising to be in the 90+ F heat and very humid the next week. Just in time for our "Macungie" swap meet which is usually hot and humid.

 My friend Terry Wiegand in Kansas has already had many days at over 100+F heat and high humidity. I had the 1925 out today for a 7 mile drive. Beautiful day. Now I have to get to those gaskets on the 37....

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Larry, that is great news about the success on your '37.  I replaced the bottom freeze plug on the back of the block in the '16.  The Evapo-Rust solution went back in yesterday afternoon and everything is dry as it should be.  I am going to leave this batch in until next weekend and drain it out to see where things are.  I know that it is going to take a second application to get to where we need to be.  I think I remember some famous company's slogan of 'Better Living Through Chemistry'.  Very applicable here in this situation.  Will keep you guys posted of my

progress.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Who was your radiator man?  In Chambersburg?  I am thinking of having my '38 Special's radiator rodded or recored, but may have the same problem already mentioned - not too many who do this anymore.  I am in Dayton, OH, so a stop in Chambersburg could be on my Hershey to-do list.  (If I cannot find someone locally.)

 

Thanks,

Jeff

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Jeff:

 The fellow near me is at KEYSTONE RADIATOR.717-264-6911. He is in a one man shop. I know he got the cores for the 37 and my1925 from a place in Pittsburgh. At Hershey last fall I believe I talked to the people who were doing these cores from there. I misplaced their contact folder. There is also POWELL  Radiator Service in Wilmington Ohio 937-382-2096 . This information I had from a 2010 Hemmings publication. I hope this helps.

 Larry

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Guys, I have a 1939 Special radiator here in Kentucky if that helps anyone.  Message me if there is any interest.  It was last in a driving car in the summer of 2013.  As far as I know it works, but does show evidence of prior repairs.

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Was your replacement core to the original specs, or a higher capacity alternative?  I found an outfit here in Dayton to do a re-core, and he said it would be same as original.  I later learned of other higher capacity alternatives (more tubes, more fins) that would still look reasonably stock, but this guy does not know of any sources.

 

Were you ever able to come up with the name of the core source in Pittsburgh?

 

I am still debating whether to pursue higher capacity options or go with a dead stock replacement.  It was ok in the day, but with today's traffic, more capability might be a good thing. 

 

One source (that my local shop has not used) is US Radiator - they have something called the Desert Cooler - not sure if it can be made in the size I need or not.

 

Any further advice on core selection would be very welcome!

 

Thanks,

Jeff

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I am still debating whether to pursue higher capacity options or go with a dead stock replacement.  It was ok in the day, but with today's traffic, more capability might be a good thing. 

 

Any further advice on core selection would be very welcome!

Thanks,

Jeff

 

In today's environment I agree that you can not have too much cooling capacity.  IMHO

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I just found the info on the Pittsburgh company. Universal Carnegie Mfg. 1-800-867-9554 66A Arch Street Extension. Carnegie, PA 15106 www.ucvintagerad.com

My re-core does have more tubes and fins than the old unit.

Edited by dibarlaw (see edit history)

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Larry and all fellow sufferers, I had the same in my two 37s. I tried all the litany that has been described in this blog as well as in many others before. My conclusion is that all mentioned activities probably help a bit, but nothing can turn around the situation as effective as a new cored rad. Of course, if all the mud is still in the system, it won´t take long until the new rad is as clogged as the old one. Chemicals have all kinds of side effects on gaskets etc., so I am not sure if the potential risk is worth it.

When you get a new core for your rad, some companies can offer high performance cores that look basically like the old ones but are much more effective (e.g. 4 rows of tubes instead of 3 rows).

So my recomemndation is: 1. get the rad cored; 2. use the time when the rad is in treatment to open the freeze plugs (you might want to remove the manifold as well) and get all the sh..t out of the block that you get hold of. Just flushing isn´t enough. Use an old wire hanger to sratch the baked stuff and then flush the mess out. You will find most of it near the last two cylinders. Don´t worry about the freeze plug opposite to the fire wall, you´ll get by this area with a wire from the last side-plug; 3. Check or block the intermediate thermostat valve; 4. if your spark plugs show a light brown surface, don´t worry about carb adjustment or ignition timing. 

It´s a bigger and not cheap project, but hey, it´s a good feeling to start a spin and being sure that you´ll return on your own 4 wheels in good shape, ain´t it? With both my cars I can go now uphill 7-10% at 100 degrees outside without any boiling for miles.

Good luck!

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Bottom line... if the heat doesn't get out of the block into the water, all the front end work (radiator, fans & etc) is money down the drain!!

 

Remember, Buick built cars that did work many years ago. While traffic is different today, thermodynamics has not changed.

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Well put Don. After doing all the above I am confident we will be OK on our trip to Nashville from here in PA.  I will keep you posted.

 Larry

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