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oil filler cap

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Oil filler cap is fully oil saturated.  Is the standard practice still was in gasoline and put a couple drops of motor oil in it.  What oil is recommended.

Thanks

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The lubrication chart in my '33 Plymouth "Instruction Book":

Oil Filler Cap (Air Cleaner). Remove, wash in gasoline. Re-oil with S.A.E. No. 50 (Heavy) fresh engine oil every 2000 miles. (see page 67)

 

On page 67 is says:

Crankcase Ventilation

 

The oil filler cap is provided with an air cleaner of copper mesh constructino similar to that of the air cleaner. This prevents dust entering the crankcase with the ventilating air. Every 2000 miles (3200 km.) or oftener, if operating in an abnormally dusty condition of roads, the oil filler cap should be removed, washed in gasoline, and the copper mesh should be dipped in S.A.E. No. 50 (heavy) fresh engine oil.

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I will stop by a napa on my way home to get some 50 wt oil.  I am installing the james peterson regulator on a 33 plymouth I just picked up that I saw your write up on and noticed the plug wires and side of the engine block was wet with oil.  Its an unrestored car with 66,000 miles on the odometer.  WIth it sitting there idling it was misting oily air and the filler cap was really wet.  Probably hasn't been cleaned in a long time or do you think there may be an underlying problem?

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I'm not at home at my own computer and can't go look up my oil filler cap but I'm sure that it has a movable tab on it that you "open" for Winter and "close" for Summer or vice versa,it's in the book. You might want to check it's setting.   

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I'm not at home at my own computer and can't go look up my oil filler cap but I'm sure that it has a movable tab on it that you "open" for Winter and "close" for Summer or vice versa,it's in the book. You might want to check it's setting.   

My oil filler cap does not have any summer/winter tab. The lower end (standard/business/roadking) models sometimes had a tab you set for summer or winter on the heat riser.

 

On the opposite side of the engine from the oil filler at the back is a draft tube. The way the system is supposed to work is a slight vacuum on the draft tube is caused by the motion of the car. This draws fresh air in through the oil filler cap and the flow of air through the crankcase rids it of combustion byproducts that have gotten past the rings.

 

If you are having an oily mist come out of the oil filler cap, it is the result of blow by within the engine. At rest, when there is no Venturi effect on the draft tube, that is not uncommon but should not be a large amount. You may want to verify that the filter screen in the draft tube (if so equipped) is clean and not blocked as that would interfere with the ventilation and require that all bypass gasses be expelled through the filler cap.

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This is what I saw when I put the voltage regulator on which seems to work great. Head gasket?

 

Color me confused on what you have, are working with and are asking about. Your profile image is of a 1934 PE and your engine looks like it is a 1933 PD. Looks like it still has the automatic clutch. Does it work? That would be pretty rare.

 

What generator do you have? I guess if they kept the '34 PE generator it would have a voltage regulator (voltage and cut out only, current regulation would still be by third brush).

 

For what it is worth, it looks like the correct oil filler cap to me.

 

And your question about the head gasket is what? ('33 and '34 use a different head gasket than '35 and up.) If you are referring to oil in that area, it is most likely crankcase blow by coming out the oil filler cap.

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You are 100 percent correct. The 34 pe in my picture ran into some engine problems from the motor builder not doing some things correctly. The crank is being welded, straighten and reground. The picture is of my unrestored 33 pd I am putting into service so we can enjoy that till I have time to get the 34 back on the road.

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Here is a picture of it. I have not tried the auto clutch because I am not 100 percent sure how it all works yet. I noticed the oil marks on the motor when I put the voltage regulator on the generator that I read about on your website. Being fairly new to these flathead wasn't sure what to make of it

post-104213-0-32403400-1433857047_thumb.

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Okay: Voltage regulator is for the '33 and is a modern electronic one mounted inside the generator. Oil on '33 PD block appears near the oil filter. And I was not fully reading/understanding your post where that was mentioned.

 

There is no oil gallery in the block that high up, so it is highly unlikely that it is coming from inside the engine. The location looks to be well defined and is behind the distributor, away from the oil filler cap. I'd look closely at the plumbing for the oil filter as the most likely source for that leak.

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As far as I know all '33s had the sliding tab on their oil filler caps. I assume you no longer have an original?

  

  The vacuum operated clutch is connected to the "FREEWHEELING" knob on the dash panel. All the way in and freewheeling and the vacuum clutch are both engaged. Half way out to the 1st stop and just the freewheeling is working. All the way out,which is about 3" from dash, and the tranny and clutch are working as normal,the freewheeling is locked and the vacuum can't get to the vacuum servo unit anymore. The half way point with the freewheeling in operation makes for easier shifting. The "drag" that the rear axle and rear wheels would normally put on the tranny is eliminated through a kind of clutch on the rear of the tranny. You don't have to double clutch anymore. Don't listen to anybody telling you that freewheeling is dangerous because you have no "engine braking" and will lose control of the car. That's pure nonsense. It works just fine. Automatic transmissions on our modern cars all go into freewheeling when we release the gas pedal. I think the problem arose because many cars still had mechanical brakes and the owners had to rely on engine braking to stop the car in the next mile or so. With the control all the way in, the vacuum from the bottom of the carb is routed to the vacuum servo clutch at the time when you and I would want to put our foot on the clutch pedal. If you go through the shifting of the gear shift ,including putting your foot on the clutch pedal to stop, all that motion is done by the can with the piston in it connected to the clutch throwout arm. It was basically the first semi-automatic transmission. You only have move the gear shift lever to select what gear you want. And actually if you are on flat ground and no traffic making you "move it" ,you can put the tranny in 3rd gear and not shift at all. The car then drives as it would if you had an automatic transmission. The later "HY DRIVE" did exactly that. The set-up was the same as the '33 with a clutch and gear shift.(Although the gear shift was on the steering column.) The vacuum servo clutch was supplanted by a bucket of oil called a "fluid coupling". But the end operation was the same as the '33 PC/PD system. You put the tranny in 3rd (Hy=high gear) and the fluid coupling did the same job as the vacuum servo clutch had in '33. I think this is missed in most writeups about the vacuum clutch system and the Hy Drive of the 50s. No one seems to have connected the "dots". They seem to think the Hy Drive was the first time Chrysler had such a system. Actually the only change was from mechanical coupling to fluid coupling. (I believe you have to engage the clutch pedal the first time you drive away in 3rd gear in the Hy Drive but not after that? I think the reason is the fluid coupling,unlike the vacuum servo clutch, cannot be brought to a stop to get the car into gear the first time. After that the slippage in the fluid coupling takes over and allows the car to sit still in gear. But if the car is shut off,once again the manual clutch has to be engaged to get the car into gear the first time.)                      

Edited by DodgeKCL (see edit history)

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As far as I know all '33s had the sliding tab on their oil filler caps. I assume you no longer have an original?            

The oil filler cap on my '33 looks exactly like the one rageracing posted above and matches the illustration in the original '33 Plymouth DeLuxe Six Instruction Book. And there is no mention of a sliding tab on the filler cap in the text of the book.

 

I'd like to see a photo of the oil filler cap you are describing.

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Here is a picture of it. I have not tried the auto clutch because I am not 100 percent sure how it all works yet. I noticed the oil marks on the motor when I put the voltage regulator on the generator that I read about on your website. Being fairly new to these flathead wasn't sure what to make of it

Oh man I'd sell my bones to own that one..  I think I have a couple of those vac.clutch's somewhere.  They are pretty well bullet prof . That little pendulum has to be

lubed with light oil time to time.  

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Oh man I'd sell my bones to own that one..  I think I have a couple of those vac.clutch's somewhere.  They are pretty well bullet prof . That little pendulum has to be

lubed with light oil time to time.  

Bullet proof? The one on my car has a worn out valve mechanism which looks like it would be inevitable as there is no filter on the air inlet so any dirt will be drawn in and act as an abrasive. I don't see any viable way of sleeving the valve tubes but maybe boring them to a consistent diameter and then building up the interior rod(s) with plating and then grinding them to size would fix them. In the meantime, I have mine disconnected from the manifold to keep from having a vacuum leak.

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After running the car alittle last night, the clutch pedal does pull in alittle when I get off the gas and push out when on the throttle.  I have the cable pulled all the way out of the dash.  The cable is very tight so I might have to take it out and maybe soak it to loosen it up.  I might do as ply33 said and block off the vacuum lines because the car does run like it has a vacuum leak.  The free wheeling part of the trans is noisey when engaged but does work.  Throwout bearing seems to be a little noisey when idling with the clutch out, how does do I grease that properly?

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. . . Throwout bearing seems to be a little noisey when idling with the clutch out, how does do I grease that properly?

Not sure about '34, but on '33 you have to remove the lower clutch housing cover to get at the grease fitting on the throwout bearing. And to get that off you need to remove the return springs for the brake and clutch pedals. Not sure, but you may also have to remove the lower bolt on frame cross member/steady rest. (At least I had that off at the same time, but I was replacing the oil pan gasket and it was keeping me from getting the pan located properly with all the gaskets in place.)

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