Jump to content

TK's 1946 Roadmaster 76-S


Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...

So!  Transmission successfully removed from the '46 Roadmaster!
 
large.59e6ca382cc8b_(2017-10-07)001BuickTransout.jpg.c35ebcc0c90f2fd8f05f434b0d833655.jpg  There she is!  And the universal joint is still attached here.

 

I dug up several tidbits of useful information from other user posts within this forum in regards to this procedure.  I began by loosening all bracket bolts underneath the engine and transmission (I did NOT remove the bolts yet - no desire to flirt with an accidental drop!).  Instead of using the long-extinct J-part "Engine Jack" tools proscribed by the shop manual, I created a shaped wooden pad and used a bottle jack (with two jack stands) and lifted the engine at the bell housing (only enough to take the pressure off of the transmission).  Then, the speedometer cable and two shift linkages were disconnected from the transmission.
 
To prepare the transmission for a linear removal, the shop manual recommended swapping the top two bolts (connecting the transmission to the bell housing) for "Transmission Pin" tools.  Naturally, these are also long-extinct specialty J-parts.  But AACA Buick forums to the rescue!  I learned that all I needed to do was buy two 5.5" bolts... saw the heads off... and just like magic, perfect pins!  So one corner at a time, I replaced the top two bolts with the pins, and loosened the bottom two bolts.
 
The rear support bracket, which held up the transmission and universal joint, came free after removing the four bolts holding it up (I had the transmission supported by the bottle jack, so the pressure was off of the support bracket).  My dad came over to assist me with the final removal - we lined up a floor jack underneath the transmission so that it could simply roll backwards once we had the transmission resting on it.  So we positioned the jack to hold the transmission, removed the bottom two transmission bolts, and guided the transmission along the 5" of transmission pins until the spline shaft was completely free.  After lowering the floor jack, I placed the transmission into the milk crate you see above!
 
I've since dropped off the transmission and universal joint to be professionally rebuilt. 

While I'm waiting to hear back on that, I've got three other items I'd like to address while the transmission is out and the rear axle assembly is free (in no particular order):

  • Rebuild the fuel pump (since it leaks profusely... yikes.)
  • Replace the rear differential/torque tube gasket (since it leaks profusely)
  • Replace the shift linkage bushings

I'm certainly looking forward to the next drive, but at the same time, I love doing the stuff like this, too   :) 

Edited by Kaftan (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a disappointing post - the transmission shop I used called me up and requested I drive over to take a look at what they found. 

Here are pics of the worst damage:
 
large.59e8e509c37e7_(2017-10-19)001TransmissionWear.jpg.bba77ee0564e246b86167e7dd4bf8a17.jpg  This gear has been wearing into the side of the case (notice the teeth are entirely worn off of the end).
 
large.59e8e505e9741_(2017-10-19)002TransmissionWear.jpg.017a8c71fe10862042af5ada7f1022c2.jpg  And here's the hole it's been drilling into the side of the case.

Nearly all of the gears in the transmission were worn or slightly damaged in some way.  But it's the case damage that's keeping this particular shop from a rebuild, I'm told. 

It's a pretty sad deal!  I'd certainly prefer my rig to have a functioning transmission, ha.  The shop was able to find a single case available for sale (no innards) - and the gentleman is asking $2,200 for it.  That's substantially out of my budget, so it looks like I'll end up with a pile of dismantled transmission parts and a stationary car until a solution can be found.
 
I'll be posting a want add in the buy/sell forum here soon, but as always, I'm open to any advice/suggestions anybody has for me at this point!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, DonMicheletti said:

$2200 for a Buick transmission is rediculous!  He is no gentleman.


Ha... when this particular individual also told us "... and I won't guarantee the case is any good", I formed a similar opinion   :) 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

 That's the kind of thing we all run into from time to time, an assumption that everyone with old cars has buckets of money, and even those that do, have no sense at all.

 Post a "Wanted" ad  on the forum here, and perhaps someone will have what you want for a decent price.

 Keith

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

TYLER, I totally agree with  Keith on this. I do not believe that your transmission is a one year specific unit. Buy and sell would be my next step. One of these Buick guys will be sure to have what you are looking for at a reasonable price. Did you ask the guy with the case only if the GOLD plating on the inside was still intact? Good Luck on your hunt. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

While the transmission acquisition continues to shake out, and since I was mid-way through "winning the fight" with a small cold, I chose to look at something simple on the Buick this weekend:  A tail light assembly. 
 
large.59f0a4e836030_(2017-10-21)001TailLightAssembly(before).jpg.966971db20ce86451283f459c08af825.jpg  Here's the before shot of the driver's tail light.
large.59f0a4ec648e3_(2017-10-21)003TailLightAssemblyremoval.jpg.f386cb2cc69027dd1f40cfa923ca1945.jpg  And a shot from the inside.  Mmmmmm.
large.59f0a4f1070d6_(2017-10-21)006TailLightAssemblyRemoval.jpg.76b026a41f10b30a8a760478fda71cce.jpg    Nice rust hole!
large.59f0a4f60fba5_(2017-10-21)007TailLightAssemblyRemoval.jpg.c85a4d4506420f7f8847d32229462902.jpg  (Carefully) disassembled.
large.59f0a4fb8a2f6_(2017-10-21)008TailLightAssemblyRemoval.jpg.6da8d2bfa5f0fa0d90acd39f8dcd4650.jpg  Wires labeled prior to cutting off sockets.

It's certainly easy to see where stagnant water was collecting.  Ick.  But, the unit has enough structural integrity to continue performing its duty, so back in it will go!  I took the sockets to Napa to try and find some replacements.  With their patient assistance, we managed to find a reasonable replacement for the turn signal socket (the one I was most concerned about, since it has a proprietary shape that clamps to the assembly).  The stop/tail light looks like it can be further disassembled, so I'll work a little more on that before trying to find a replacement.
 
Looking at how much exposed wire I have on these, it seems like a miracle that any of these lights worked at all!

 

Before any of the tail lights get reassembled, I'd sure like to get them all "up to snuff".  Correct me if my logic is in the wrong place here, but I'm thinking media-blasting the rusted pieces, followed by applying a protective coating.  I've only heard bad things about the Harbor Freight small parts blaster, so I'm on the hunt for a alternate solution!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Kaftan said:

Before any of the tail lights get reassembled, I'd sure like to get them all "up to snuff".  Correct me if my logic is in the wrong place here, but I'm thinking media-blasting the rusted pieces, followed by applying a protective coating.  I've only heard bad things about the Harbor Freight small parts blaster, so I'm on the hunt for a alternate solution!

 

 

If you mean the tail light housing, I wouldn't blast it with much, you'll blow a hole in it.  I recommend a 24hr soak in WD-40 Rust soak, or evapo-rust.  I used this on my license plate light housings.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, wndsofchng06 said:

If you mean the tail light housing, I wouldn't blast it with much, you'll blow a hole in it.  I recommend a 24hr soak in WD-40 Rust soak, or evapo-rust.  I used this on my license plate light housings.

 

Indeed, that's what I mean!  Wow, I didn't even know rust-soaking was an option; it certainly seems like a gentler option.  Thanks for sharing the advice!!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Kaftan said:

 

Indeed, that's what I mean!  Wow, I didn't even know rust-soaking was an option; it certainly seems like a gentler option.  Thanks for sharing the advice!!

It's available at Lowe's  about 20 bucks for a gallon.  Biodegradable when finished.  great for small or delicate items.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 2 years later...

A'ighty, little update after 2.5 years of... nothing.  

TRANSMISSION

Thanks to another angel user from this forum (who has since deleted his account, so the only shout-out I can give is "Greg"), another transmission and ball joint were located!  Those were purchased in late 2017.  The trans had a couple damaged pieces which I was able to scavenge from my existing dead trans.  The original plan was that I'd follow the shop guide and perform the rebuild myself, but since the cost of mistake would be so high with this unit, the plan changed to paying a professional to go through and repair the unit.  That happened in early 2019.  Cleaning up and replacing ball joint shims and seal was the only remaining task I had before sticking the trans back in, which was performed last night:

large.622394113_(2020-05-18)Transmission-testingshifts.jpg.4ecd69ba751a71c6451b93eb8b44f2d8.jpg    Verifying the gear and shifting mechanisms...

large.1714873607_(2020-05-18)Transmission-cleaningballjoint.jpg.b660d05262c8a75349d003dbc8df11e0.jpg    Disassembling the ball joint for cleaning... preparing to replace the existing seal

large.145693943_(2020-05-18)Transmission-Reassembly.jpg.da1c426f578f3adbe320536585ae9bbd.jpg    This dirt bike stand worked perfect for holding the trans sideways.  Rebuilding the ball joint and centering the shims/seal from top was much easier.

Reading through the shop manual reprint gave me the knowledge necessary for the ball joint service.  With the joint being lubed by the transmission oil... jeez the cost of the seal failure would be high.  Pretty important seal, ha, for the entire trans lubrication system to depend on.  I anticipate spending the rest of the week cleaning the transmission mounting crossbar (etc) under the rig - hopefully I'll be able to dig up some help lift this trans back in within the next week or two.

LIGHTS

No progress on the tail lights aside from purchasing the rust soak, ha.  Just so I address the question posed to me 2.5 years ago.  I'd like to include running new wire as part of the re-do, but accessing that is proving more challenging than I imagined, ha.  (rightfully so?).  

Managed to get my hands on a new fog lamp (bevel and glass) to replace the one which was previously missing.  After removing and disassembling both fog lamps, the internals are fiercely corroded.  Purchased new electric guts to rebuild; will likely need to run new wiring here, too.

OTHER

Can't seem to figure out a method to get the oil plug to stop leaking.  It's abundantly clear that over-torquing the plug will cause the pan threads to cave, which seems like a bad route to go.  Perhaps some kind of adhesive/sealant will do the trick.

The stock fuel pump gave up, ha.  Prior to transmission removal, I had attempted an engine start - the fuel pump tried, then spewed gas out of its crevices. I have the rebuild kit, so that is just a matter of time (I hope).

The steering wheel compound is crumbling away, making driving hazardous (or at the very least, uncomfortable, ha).  Still investigating solutions for that.  Now that I bring that up, I'm wondering if there are steering box lube points I should give attention to. Hmm.


Hopefully I'll get the Buick back in the sun soon!  She needs to stretch the old wheels!

Edited by Kaftan
grammar (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tyler, so nice to hear from you again after so long! Glad some progress has been made on the car.

There are places that sell repro wiring harnesses, Rhode Island....., and Harnesses Unlimited are two I know of. Not cheap though! I bought mine from the latter place, and was very satisfied with it. I believe Rhode Island, sorry I can't remember the full name, sells the harnesses in sections, which might help you out. A bit of a pain to install, unless the car is all apart, even then its' tricky. Most of the original insulation will be going bad, if not now, as you use it you will likely run into issues.

 The issue with the oil plug might be the washer, I've seen them get chewed up over the years. There are a few places that sell repros, but perhaps you might be find a replacement at a good parts store???

 Steering wheels are tough, there are a few places that will recast them, but they are a bit costly, plus it'll look a bit odd if your car is otherwise original. At times you might be able to find a used one in better shape, to use as a driver quality, but the biggest issue is that old plastic which doesn't stand up well over the years. I've heard some folks use body filler to repair it, but that is not easy, and the wheel needs to be cleaned so that the crumbly bits are gone, which might mean everything! Sorry I don't have a better answer for you right now.

 Anyway, hope this helps you a bit.

 Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello again, Keith! I appreciate you sharing your advice and referrals. 
As I was trying to gather the knowledge necessary to begin wiring, I hadn't thought that there would be a small business out there who would already have custom wiring at the ready!  The learning curve is still there, ha, but the only way to overcome it now is to get my hands dirty!
Ha, you called it:  The steering wheel is entirely made up of crumbling bits.  The "BUICK" buttons on the dash radio unit are in an equally fragile state from the decades of weather exposure... I won't be trying to push them in anytime soon! :) 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll probably be going to a junkyard Friday, weather permitting, to scavenge parts for my ‘52 Special, want I should look for a steering wheel while I’m there? Condition may not be the best, but it sounds like one in a not so crumbly state of decay may be better than the one you have. I believe there may be a Buick or two from the ‘‘40s in the pile. What a waste of a beautiful convertible!

0D078A33-F1DA-4090-827A-9AB2E7CAB51F.jpeg

Edited by Rusty Heaps (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Rusty Heaps said:

I’ll probably be going to a junkyard Friday, weather permitting, to scavenge parts for my ‘52 Special, want I should look for a steering wheel while I’m there? Condition may not be the best, but it sounds like one in a not so crumbly state of decay may be better than the one you have. I believe there may be a Buick or two from the ‘‘40s in the pile. What a waste of a beautiful convertible!

0D078A33-F1DA-4090-827A-9AB2E7CAB51F.jpeg

Unlike most things,  I have found that things like steering wheels and dash pads often survive better in the midwest than elsewhere where there is more constant heat.  You may be surprised!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

@Rusty Heaps  Rats!  I appreciate you checking, all the same :)

Managed to get some painting and prep work done about a week ago.

large.465769079_(2020-05-25)001TransSupport.jpg.60cc707be07df7b0ef46ee2e49832d19.jpg  Cleaned and painted the trans support brackets.  Yes, the smaller one has a chunk broken off from a past trauma of some kind!

large.728073736_(2020-05-27)001Bellhousing.jpg.d6bbac2c5f29ddae0871d04e4ab2c486.jpg  Getting ready to clean up the bell housing plate before installing new gasket

large.1453012839_(2020-05-27)002BellHousing.jpg.8df903c96c8ba90fb2858cd96158fec7.jpg  Pretty sure this is the original paint color, peeking through!

Then, spent the entirety of my Saturday afternoon (and a good chunk of the evening, too) reinstalling the transmission.  Built a small rack for trans out of some scrap wood to set atop the floor jack, and slowly worked the new unit in:

large.1423632543_(2020-06-06)001Transmission.jpg.60ebb19ff560aee57d19810a830e6abb.jpg

I wish I could say it all went in as easy as it came out, but nobody reading this would believe that, ha.  It managed to take me most of an hour of fiddling around before I realized I was running into a minor bolt difference on this trans ('41) versus my original ('46).  The '41 had an additional two alignment bolt holes which the rubber-packed bracket (resting underneath bell housing) were supposed to thread through (the '46 trans union, by comparison, did not extend down far enough for this to matter).  Everything would have been fine, except some past trauma to the undercarriage had bent the rubber-packed bracket out of shape.  After another hour of gently straightening out those pins, the trans slid in just fine:

large.1266235483_(2020-06-06)002Transmission.jpg.20a37d000acc86592ef1b2dfee28495f.jpg  The two pins are visible at the bottom of this pic.  The original '46 trans marrying surface did not extend down that far, and ignored those pins.

When I say "slid in just fine", I mean to say that it was still a weird game of laying on my back under a car while managing a floor jack and struggling to see what I was doing, ha.  Probably not supposed to be a one-person job!  A quick survey of linkage pieces, together with pictures from my old trans prior to removal, concluded I have all the pieces lined up to get everything back in order.  I'm going to take this opportunity to replace the washers/bushings/etc in these shift and clutch linkages while I've got it apart.

Happy June, everyone :)

Edited by Kaftan (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 8 months later...
Posted (edited)

Another year, another post!  Ha.  But seriously - ended up getting engaged in Dec 2020!  Fiancée has been showing interest and romanticizing the idea of driving around in the Buick.  So that's all it took for me to stop procrastinating on this - you know how it goes! 

Checklist to next drive:

  • Reassemble rear suspension (was disassembled for transmission work)
  • Reconnect and bleed braking system (was disconnected with rear suspension)
  • Repair tail lights to functioning order
  • License the car
  • Rebuild failed fuel pump
  • Repair disintegrating steering wheel
  • Remove passenger side glass (too much exhaust enters cab)
  • Replace ventilation duct hoses (too much exhaust enters cab) 
  • Replace upper radiator hose (previous application pinched off)

Hopefully not too much more needs to be addressed for a bare-bones drive.  I'm guessing the ol' 6V battery is shot from just sitting there for the past few years with no tender... but maybe not!  I ordered various parts/pieces/tools to begin addressing some of the above items - so I'll post on them as things move forward.

For now, though, let's take a look at what I already had ready to go:  Rebuilding the Fuel Pump.

Removing the fuel pump was a little tight with the oil filter mounted right above it, but I chose to work around it instead of removing the oil filter assembly.  After disconnecting the four lines (two in, two out), there were two bolts holding the pump to the engine block... and out it easily came!

large.583619037_(2021-03-02)001FuelPumpOut.jpg.53e4056b684fdf5a0923f4486bab998f.jpg large.410831773_(2021-03-02)002RebuildKitContents.jpg.8328defbf01fd16bd2f1d54c65018179.jpglarge.1362027337_(2021-03-02)003ServiceManualPage.jpg.89a961084656ddcddbf9d572399d859b.jpg

Armed with the rebuild kit (Bob's Automobilia, Item FK-70P, $93.50) and one entire page of fuel pump info from the service manual, I went to work:

large.306887623_(2021-03-02)004FuelBowlremoved.jpg.8f7b309295cae3a58f0dd3204533a498.jpg  Removed the sediment bowl
large.1236011037_(2021-03-02)005LowerFilterRemoved.jpg.274e47f817d231552b10eb61638f52c8.jpg  Removed the strainer and strainer bracket
large.676410336_(2021-03-02)006AirDomeRemoval.jpg.c31a03ff1dbe1b1b4aa56e3058cfb270.jpg  Removed the air dome
large.1414645528_(2021-03-02)007TopCapremoved.jpg.d53a7bccf315a46caab5d530714a38f0.jpg  Removed the top cap - this modern-ish gasket indicates this isn't the first rebuild!
large.1050544882_(2021-03-02)009Lowercompartment.jpg.1e945052c28c0702393d3e9f2950d712.jpg  Opened the lower compartment
large.879963326_(2021-03-02)018bottomoflowercompartment.jpg.867fbd0b885dccb4ee85e5a7dee4a56b.jpg  Close up (bottom half of lower compartment) The two one-way valves removed after the one screw removed
large.1513911023_(2021-03-02)010UpperCompartment.jpg.40fe439fa1006f9b908f9139db63e204.jpg  Opened upper compartment (Spring loaded!  Shot across the workbench!  Glad it wasn't my face!!)
large.512520883_(2021-03-02)017topofuppercompartment.jpg.d20d30e2dc7a638aaec2327d2ab67e72.jpg  Close up (upper half of upper compartment) The two one-way valves removed after screw removed
large.1536137072_(2021-03-02)011Punchingrockerpin.jpg.0b6047f4602ab2e1cbf1545950c0bb8e.jpg  Mid-way through punching the rocker arm pin out
large.254972516_(2021-03-02)016pieceslinedup.jpg.18380625a7a1e7ffd263cbfa0f024ac0.jpg  Survey of pieces after disassembly
large.259707194_(2021-03-02)013springassemblyuppercompartment.jpg.d2d47e1ebb0b2f4b10207cf764977c43.jpg  Close up of upper compartment spring setup and diaphragm
large.1706185483_(2021-03-02)012Bottomofuppercompartment.jpg.3b8b71babe3563fa34582ad65c67e452.jpg  Close up - bottom of upper compartment (is that... grass???)

...And as of right now, the pieces and parts are now soaking in parts cleaner, waiting for me to begin scrubbing on them this evening.  Once done and dried, I intend on giving the outer parts a good ol' coating of heat-resistant black engine paint.  

Hope everyone is thoroughly enjoying their Buick rigs!  -TK

Edited by Kaftan (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Kaftan changed the title to TK's 1946 Roadmaster 76-S

Thanks for the suggestion, @JohnD1956!  True to form, by the time I had everything all cleaned off, I didn't really want to paint over all the clean (for now) beauty;  after reading your comment, I reassembled without the paint.  

large.691697991_(2021-03-03)002Partscleaned.jpg.aad255382ddba2586885d01cb6ccc300.jpg  Fuel Pump parts after a chem dip and wipe down
large.1012005031_(2021-03-03)005Reassembled.jpg.6719f4404eb98591a06a71da3050cbee.jpg   Pic of reassembled product
large.1052518770_(2021-03-03)004Reassembled.jpg.d6d3a3fb8fd09c8813930ea688c0a114.jpg  Another pic of reassembled finished product

Holy buckets, I should have known that reassembly would be a monster.  After all, the spring-loaded contraption put a dent into the wall behind my workbench when I opened it up!  After many, many setbacks, I'm happy to have a finished product.

Question for any who have worked on these sort of pumps before - how much force does a newly rebuilt pump take to complete a full cycle?  I can get this rebuilt pump to cycle, but woof, it takes A LOT of force - I need to put most of my weight into it.  After my first main compartment assembly, I disassembled to double-check all my pictures and notes.  After assembling a 2nd time, the result was unfortunately the same.  But, maybe it's normal to need a lot of force to cycle this?  Fingers crossed.  I'm worried about it, though.  

In other news, while some of the parts were still chem-bathing, I replaced the pinched upper radiator hose with a replacement, as follows:

large.678612898_(2021-03-03)001NewUpperRadHose.jpg.1621c72d67275c06cb9e04fc7ba6d43d.jpg  Part number for reference.  Had to cut about 1-1/4 inches off, but worked great.

Cordially,
Kaftan

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have faint recollection of trying to cycle a fuel pump manually and being unsuccessful. That pump has now been on my car since 2003.  

 

And as to that top hose, I recommend a filter of some cut off panty hose at the radiator connection to catch any debris that may be inside the engine block. That debris will pass into the top tank of the radiator which will increase the chances of overheating.  The filter material should be cleaned and or replaced often. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

You continue to prove that you know your stuff!!  Maybe you were somehow watching me during the process??  When I drained out a portion of the coolant before changing the upper hose... well, it didn't look all that great (and yes, small chunkies were evident).  Therefore, I was already thinking another flush or two would be required, but had not pondered any kind of coolant filter.  Thanks yet again for the heads-up!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

@kaftan  look around and see if you can find a TEFBA (or similar) coolant filter.  The big disadvantage is you'll have to cut that brand new hose to get it in.  The advantage is the filter element can be pulled out, cleaned, and returned.  I have had mine in my '56 so long, probably going back to 2000 or so, and I still get some sediment out of this engine after a highway run. 

 

tefba filter.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

 Nice to see a new post from you, and that you have got going back on the car again. Also Congrats on the engagement! I have rebuilt those pumps too, and they are a serious pain to do!

 Hopefully the reassembly of the car goes well for you.

 Keith

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Alllllrighty then, a few more steps forward, and one disturbingly gigantic step backward!

This past week has seen me put in several long nights in the garage to get some things done.  Not that I have a lot to show for it, ha - things just seem to take me entire, consecutive hours!

While awaiting for ordered pieces and parts to arrive, I filled the transmission up with 85w-140.  I ended up wearing a quart of it, ha, but got the job done. My attention turned to reassembling the rear suspension, which I'm sure most know is not complicated at all.  It's been a long time since the Buick has been this assembled!

I then revisited the air intake.  "Huh, that's funny... I thought I had just put oil in the oil bath..."  Sure enough, a miniscule hole was evident.  So I took some measurements, figured out which seal points were critical, and ended up with a backyard air filter assembly:
 
large.20210310_023015814_iOS.jpg.7d3ab1c42c4677571243339b9ea04ccf.jpg  Disassembled once more...

large.20210310_004105379_iOS.jpg.c2d2420702651e37ca6fd43c22d7336a.jpg  Diameter measurements...

large.20210310_023907537_iOS.jpg.715029ad54057effa2a3dc542a0d56c6.jpg  Alternative product identified (gasket matched required diameter) - cut to size

large.20210310_031047550_iOS.jpg.40d923ef0f46b26d74f84517324d0a83.jpg  Reassembled

I can't say I'm convinced this is more than just a temporary solution - but at least I get to keep the overall stock aesthetic of the full air filter assembly, heh!

Once more parts/supplies arrived, I was ready to reinstall the rebuilt fuel filter.  After giving the linkages and rocker arm pieces a generous dose of assembly lube (and the filter gasket a bit of grey gasket compound), back into the engine block she went:

large.20210316_002652988_iOS.jpg.dfbe4bd39f47af44483adb511dbcd7b9.jpg  Pretty.

Reinstallation was challenging for this amateur!  I remember wondering, out loud to myself, how I was going to get that back in there while I was removing it.  The lower rear fuel line was not easy to access.  I managed to inadvertently cross-thread the intake the first time, but luckily that's easy enough to replace without the need to remove the pump.  After it was all fastened up, it was time to see if she worked!  Would my rebuild attempt pay off?

The 10-amp 6v tender on the battery flashed green, and I refilled the oil with Edge 10w-30. I restored power to the rest of the system (via isolator switch), and tried to get the engine to turn over.  No dice - a quick test with a batter tester revealed the battery was junk.  And why not - it had only been sitting for three years with no charge.  After a trip to NAPA and $140 later, it was time for round two.  The engine turned, but no fuel was delivered.  After re-checking all the fuel lines, I disconnected the upper and lower to prime with fuel.  Additionally, I opened up the top cap of the fuel pump and placed some fuel in the top compartment.  After reconnecting everything, ta-da, the pump delivered fuel to the bowl like a champ.

...which made something magical occur.  After seeing my disassembled Buick in my garage every day, this was the first time in three years I was able to listen to the melody of that engine run.  Ahhhhhh 💖

On to the next task!  I had received an upper radiator filter, much like @JohnD1956 recommended.  There's not much hose to work with, but managed to squeeze it in pretty good:

large.20210316_002804591_iOS.jpg.a5de45e4e5220c4c099725cd93c9c03b.jpg  This shiny fella came from SummitRacing.com

Cool beans.  I had previously stocked up on distilled water.  Now I emptied the radiator, and refilled it.  Time to idle the engine up to temp to cycle some of that old coolant.  Only takes a few minutes, and the thermostat opens.  The coolant wasn't super nasty, but it it certainly wasn't clean green, either.  The filter did its job and picked up a few chunky specs - I anticipate more will come when I use the coolant system cleaner next.

So I'm watching the coolant go through the filter.  Here's where the story takes a dark turn.  I begin to hear a "tick-tick-tick-tick-tick" come from the engine.  It immediately has my full attention.  The tick gets worse.  "tick-tick-tick-TICK-TICK-TICK"  [at this point, I'm now sprinting to the ignition to shut it all down].  As I reach in to shut it off, the TICK upgrades to what I can only describe as full valve blow-by.  It manages to make the awful sound three times before I switch the engine off.  This entire scene takes place over the span of maybe 11 seconds.

I sat there, heartbroken, for a few moments.  Morale crashed.  I may have had an eye water up.  After closing the garage doors, I simply went inside the house without cleaning up my tools or anything, ugh.

So, there she sits.  I'm relatively confident that the problem will be evident once I remove the valve cover.  My mind is swirling, wondering what caused this.  Overheating?  Seems unlikely; the thermostat was only open for 15 seconds or so.  No oil?  Possible, but I'm not sure how I could test that theory.  Did something finally give up from my non-ethanol fuel?  I've been putting in the lead additive, so I wouldn't think so.  But, the first part to solving the problem is identifying it... and I haven't been back to look at it just yet.  Maybe it's time to pull the entire powerhouse and give it the rebuild it deserves... but I've been unable to identify someone local with the proper expertise in this sort of endeavor.  I'm hesitant to take a crack at it myself, with zero engine building experience. 

Some steps forward... some steps back!  As they say in the old Disney movies - "Keep Moving Forward!".  I'm just currently unaware of the path forward at this point!!

Edited by Kaftan (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Very sorry to hear. Do a compression test, pull the valve and side covers (push rods) and it will become evident what went wrong. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Valk. When you are ready to get back into it pull the valve cover and the push rod cover and see what you can see.

On my '41 Roadmaster I had a push rod break on me one day, and oh my was it bad. I thought something terrible have happened, however in my case it was a defective part, as it was recently rebuilt.

 Without it running for a while you might have a stuck valve or two which would show up as damaged push rods or rockers. Just a guess, but it happens. You just have to go looking and see where it leads you.

 Keith

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to see you back at it and your continuing chronicling with great pictures of all your efforts. Following!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2021 at 7:06 PM, Buicknutty said:

Perhaps an issue with the fuel pump?

 

Considering the recent rebuild, my first thought too. Not saying you did something wrong, just maybe, hopefully something in it let loose.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a very intriguing thought... It certainly could be the fuel pump.  An imploded pump would be a much better problem to have, ha.  That is to say, of course, I'll still be checking out under the valve cover to see what I can see. 

Thank you, all, for the advice!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...