Blackpack

Violent shaking in my 48 Super

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I just leaned my head back and looked at the set of mechanic's books my Mother helped me buy in 1959; just wondering how old and old timer is.

 

Finding an identifiably bad part is really a good thing. There have been a couple in the saga.

 

I have to admit, I was concerned when you wrote the replacement was a 12 spring instead of a diaphragm clutch. Did someone miss Sesame Street the day they did "just like"?

 

I was in a similar situation with my '86 convertible; new engine, rebuilt transmission, rebuilt subframe. The engine was running rough as a cob. I bought an old OTC 4000 meter for the ODB1, new injectors, and more. I couldn't pin down the crappy running. I disassembled every component of the fuel inject system and engine management. I did a homerun continuity check on every wire to the fuel injectors and found nothing amiss. I confided in my wife that I was going to put 200 miles on the car no matter how it ran and them go through everything again. That was 350 miles ago and over the weekend she asked when I was going to do that big job I told her about. It's running fine. I don't know what changed, just my abstinence and willingness the break the damned thing and let triple A bring it home.

 

Given all the effort into finding a untenable problem, if it was mine, I'd say dammit, I'm putting 200 miles on it and hope I break what's wrong, let it shake. I'd just keep it off the show field and only visit my best friends. When all else fails illogic is the only logical path. Try it or toss it on a flatbed and send it up here. Sometimes busting the bronc has to be taken literally.

Bernie

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Stopped this morning to see if the mechanic received the new Pressure Plate on Friday and all the receptionist would say is that she was not supposed to talk to me about it and that I needed to go back to the garage area and talk to the mechanic/owner. I didn't have a good feeling. He said that the delivery driver dropped the new part off at closing time on Friday and he stayed Friday night to put the tranny and rear end back in. Took it off the lift, put it in gear and IT STILL SHAKES!!!! The old pressure plate was definitely warped and I can see where it is was contacting the flywheel unevenly. I just don't know what else to do. The mechanic has already put a bunch of overtime into fixing this thing, working weekends, holidays, and evenings and he has run out of ideas. He is now calling around to some old timers to get help. He doesn't want to give up, but I know he is losing money hand over fist on this car (unless I get hit with a huge bill) and I know he wants his lift back. It's now been in his shop 97 days. I feel like I ought to just take the car back, but I don't know who else to turn to. I just pray to God that the end of the crank isn't bent. You guys have been great with your advice and we have tried everything that has been discussed on this thread except for removing the torque tube and looking inside. I think that is going to be my mechanic's last attempt at fixing this. I'm afraid I just bought a very expensive chunk of metal. Seller of car and inspection company will not return emails so I guess I'm on my own

I know this is very frustrating, BlackPack…..

Lot's of us are rooting for you!

 

I think you (or your mechanic) really need to take the entire torque tube out and dismantle it all out on the floor and see what's what in there.

 

I know WIllie said there's no u-joint in there…but, there is some sort of slip fit carrier bearing that that drive shaft 

runs through.  If any of that is broken or compromised…. it will shake the daylights out of the car.

 

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I know this is very frustrating, BlackPack…..

Lot's of us are rooting for you!

 

I think you (or your mechanic) really need to take the entire torque tube out and dismantle it all out on the floor and see what's what in there.

 

I know WIllie said there's no u-joint in there…but, there is some sort of slip fit carrier bearing that that drive shaft 

runs through.  If any of that is broken or compromised…. it will shake the daylights out of the car.

U-joint behind the torque ball, driveshaft engages splines in the u-joint, end of driveshaft rides in bushing in torque ball ---u-joint or bushing defects would be the only thing that could go wrong since the other end of the driveshaft is tightly pressed  to the pinion splines.  Of course bent driveshafts  and loose pinion could cause problems, but that would be at all speeds, not just on take off.  It is easy enough to check the flywheel with a dial indicator, but it would be hard to damage that unless dropped.

 

Years ago my father had a 64 Dodge truck that shook violently on take off until I borrowed it.  Night time, raining, no flashlight, 200 miles from home the shift linkage jammed in 3rd gear.  After 20+ starts in 3rd it was smooth.

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Is this picture an illusion?the bussing on the picture dosen`t looks right.

Leif in Sweden.

Leif, not sure what you are seeing. This is the tail of my transmission. That is the brass bushing and gear oil drain back channel at the 6 o'clock position.  My transmission/driveline is working as designed.  

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Leif, not sure what you are seeing. This is the tail of my transmission. That is the brass bushing and gear oil drain back channel at the 6 o'clock position.  My transmission/driveline is working as designed.  

On the picture the bussing looks thinner at the oil drain hole?But it can have something with the camera angle to do?

Leif in Sweden.

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U-joint behind the torque ball, driveshaft engages splines in the u-joint, end of driveshaft rides in bushing in torque ball ---u-joint or bushing defects would be the only thing that could go wrong since the other end of the driveshaft is tightly pressed  to the pinion splines.  Of course bent driveshafts  and loose pinion could cause problems, but that would be at all speeds, not just on take off.  It is easy enough to check the flywheel with a dial indicator, but it would be hard to damage that unless dropped.

 

Years ago my father had a 64 Dodge truck that shook violently on take off until I borrowed it.  Night time, raining, no flashlight, 200 miles from home the shift linkage jammed in 3rd gear.  After 20+ starts in 3rd it was smooth.

 

That was my thoughts after the first repair.  Drive time might be required. Let it settle in.  However, the transmission was found to be have missing internal parts requiring a second removal.   

 

(Note:  when I performed brake overhauls on cars during the 80's/90's the test drive was not just to assure firm pedal but the car had stopping power with the new pads/shoes.  Often times several miles using the brakes hard were required to break/settle the shoes/pads in giving confidence there is very little to no brake fade or non-performance. The clutch is the same material as brakes.    Drive time might be required to have the clutch settle in.    

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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On the picture the bussing looks thinner at the oil drain hole?But it can have something with the camera angle to do?

Leif in Sweden.He 

Must be camera angle the bushing was not altered and similar thickness.

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Crack open the bottles of Champaign! After 97 days, complete clutch and gear box rebuild, rear axle rebuild. And having the tranny out 4 times, the problem has been discovered! It came down to three out of four missing bolts. Pretty important bolts at that! They happen to hold the bell housing to the block. I can't believe the restoration shop that sold the car to me could have made such a bone head mistake. In an effort to follow the guidelines of this forum, I will not mention the name of the restoration shop or the inspection service, but if your looking at buying a classic car in the Amarillo, TX area and want a referral, just inbox me. Thanks to everyone that followed and commented on this thread. You guys are great and I appreciate all of the expertise and words of encouragement

Edited by Blackpack (see edit history)
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Well, cheers to everyone who suggested there was something loose up front.

By the way, the bell housing has to be removed to remove the clutch and flywheel.Wasn't that step one?

Correct me if I am wrong please.

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So now you can spend the night cracking walnut shells in the driveway...... very slowly. (It gets boring up here in the frozen North). Those are the four bolts hidden by the flywheel, aren't they; I remember them from when I was a kid.

 

Isn't that car silky to drive? Just think of that one hundred pound 80 year old woman in the showroom sliding in for a test drive. They made the clutch and the door handles just for her.

 

I can imagine the conversation:

"Hey! Where do these go?"

"Oh Sh**!, they go up under the flywheel."

"But it's all back together."

"Well they over engineered a lot of stuff back then."

"If he complains we'll put them in under warranty."

 

June 2015 at the diner.

"Remember that Buick with the extra bolts?"

"Must be OK, haven't heard anything."

"These home fries suck and the coffee tastes like soap. Should I tell the cook?"

"Nah, he don't care."

 

Good luck, that Roadmaster is a great car.

Bernie

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John,

Mechanic said he did not have to remove the bell housing to get the clutch out.

Bernie, you crack me up:) I don't get the car back until tomorrow and I can't wait to drive her for the first time without feeling like I'm firing an Anti Aircraft Gun. Thanks for all your help and advice

Jay

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Well, cheers to everyone who suggested there was something loose up front.

By the way, the bell housing has to be removed to remove the clutch and flywheel.Wasn't that step one?

Correct me if I am wrong please.

 

I do know that my 54 required the bell housing to be removed.  I would like to see the design of the bell housing on this Buick

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)

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Crack open the bottles of Champaign! After 97 days, complete clutch and gear box rebuild, rear axle rebuild. And having the tranny out 4 times, the problem has been discovered! It came down to three out of four missing bolts. Pretty important bolts at that! They happen to hold the bell housing to the block. I can't believe the restoration shop that sold the car to me could have made such a bone head mistake. In an effort to follow the guidelines of this forum, I will not mention the name of the restoration shop or the inspection service, but if your looking at buying a classic car in the Amarillo, TX area and want a referral, just inbox me. Thanks to everyone that followed and commented on this thread. You guys are great and I appreciate all of the expertise and words of encouragement

 

The sad part here Jay is the fact that the transmission was a bag of broken gears and leaking like Vesuvius.  The rear had broken items and leaking seals.  The dealer was selling you a car in A #1 shape.  And it is not a wonder when things are said about "used car salesmen."  It's a peach!   

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Chris, what's worse is they claim to be a classic car restoration shop that also offers classic car inspections. Lesson learned. Next time, I'll jump on a plane and check it myself. I would have saved money doing that

Edited by Blackpack (see edit history)

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Shame really. Thankfully the Buick was purchased by you and saw it to completion. Most would have walked away or contacted a lawyer.

Best part is you now have a favorite page in your browser that takes you to a place where this a bunch of Buick lovers that are always interested and willing to lend support.

Have a good time in your smooth running Buick.

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Chris, what's worse is they claim to be a classic car restoration shop that also offers classic car inspections. Lesson learned. Next time, I'll jump on a plane and check it myself. I would have saved money doing that

 

I have never used a service to buy an unseen car. My best resource has been the club rosters. Over the last 20 years I have sent out a few $50 bills to local club members. That was when a 50 meant something. I would send at lease $100 or more depending on the car today. I started sending cash because the guys never cashed my checks. I think they were just happy to do it.

 

About 15 years ago I had a great customized Chevy Fleetline from Goodguy's classifieds checked out by a Cadillac Club member. Actually, I think it was in Indiana. I looked at local members and found a guy who owner 3 or 4 mid '50's hearses. I thought, well, this ones is eclectic enough and gave him a call. It turned out he knew the car and worked in the shop that had installed the exhaust on it. He told me his opinion might be biased because the car belonged to a friend. I sent him a very objective checklist (like, are there water stains near the rear window trim and the like). Being a non-professional, he did a diligent job. He even offered transportation from a friend, which we used. It turned out to be a wonderful car. I serviced the car when it arrived and, as I remember, I only did about $350 worth of work on it.

 

That is a benefit of membership, whether the AACA, BCA, CLCA, RROC, and many more, each with specific areas of expertise. I've probably listed 20 to 30 thousand members in that short list.

 

And the local members know these cars. Very few are hidden away and unknown. The ones that are being used are known even better. A friend of mine promotes the resources of the club in every purchase. He says "Don't buy the car and then join the club, join the club and use its resources to buy the best car you can." That avoids the uncomfortable moment when one arrives all smiles at their first outing and someone says "Oh, you bought "that" car." All the members knew, the seller knew, the only one out of the loop was the uniformed buyer (and I have been looking for him since I was 12).

 

That Roadmaster is a nice car and over the next 20+ years it is going to be hard whether to take the Buick or the Bird, Strive for a minimum of 15 miles per week on both. They will always maintain their highest value if you do. And while their value stays optimized, you will quickly forget the details of each expense. And ALWAYS wear out tires before they dry rot!

 

Bernie

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What I did was look for a car that was within 200 miles of my home.  At this range I could make a visit to the owner and inspect the vehicle myself.  However, asking a club member close by a potential purchase is a great idea.  A few ducats well spent for a good honest report.    

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party.gif well done,always good to see a problem fixed :)

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    That's great that you got it fixed!  And those issues inside the gearbox weren't going to go away.  If you made it through this mess with the same mechanic, then he is a keeper! Most would have bailed out when the problems seemed that intractable. Congratulations

Pat

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Wonder how many other 'omissions' there are...

Before driving very much, check the brakes (every part and every inch of the system)

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Wonder how many other 'omissions' there are...

Before driving very much, check the brakes (every part and every inch of the system)

 

Old tank has a good point. 

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Yeah, maybe they were working night and made nocturnal omissions........... while they were awake! I think there's another name for that.

Bernie

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