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Early Farm Wagon with Buick Ties.


Dandy Dave
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LOL.. Yup. First lesson in back woods Engineering.  Gravitational Thrust, Speed. Force in motion. Impact. Is the Radio Flyer OK??? :lol:  Dandy Dave! 

 

  Yeah, did not hurt the wagon, but it wore out in a couple years, what with four of us fighting over it.  The bottom strand of wire jerked OLLIN out onto the ground.

 

  Ben

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Thanks again to Dandy Dave for his keen eye in finding the wagon.  Larry for the use of his trailer.  Kevin for helping get the loan of the Flint made GMC HD Duramax to pick up the Flint made FWW Wagon. Brown and Sons Automotive for the fuel and Genesee County Historical Society for other expenses.

 

Now.  For the 3 New York drivers who did their very best to run us off the road, three different times (2500 HD + 24' enclosed trailer + wagon Vs. Prius'), for reasons, well, the BCA'rs from NY will have to explain that to us Michigander BCA'rs; its good to be home.  I have decided that Santa needs to bring Larry a nice pair of driving gloves to further assist with these folks in the future (Larry expertly kept the shiny side up at all times).  I, on the otherhand, need an astronaut diaper.

 

Wagons, Ho!

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LOL.. Yup. First lesson in back woods Engineering.  Gravitational Thrust, Speed. Force in motion. Impact. Is the Radio Flyer OK??? :lol:  Dandy Dave! 

Yep I learned about all the above plus "a body in motion will remain in motion unless acted upon by another external motion" when at the age of 9 I made a motor cycle using a bicycle, a lawnmower motor, a fan belt and pulley, but the contraption I rigged to disengage said pulley and fan belt didn't work. Hence the black berry patch that was growing over the 4 ft ditch became the area of "impact"

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Well I guess that I need to add some pictures.  Finally getting some time to sit for a few minutes.

 

I would also like to share Brian's sentiments to say thanks to all that helped to accomplish this retrieval. 

The wagon is now safely stored in a "safe house" 

 

The last photo shows over 1 Century of Flint Built cargo hauling.  The GMC is the truck that we used to get the wagon.

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Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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That box is so worn I was afraid it would collapse on the trip to Michigan.  Glad to see it survived.  But restoration would probably mean an all new box? 

Still, I remember those wagons in the Studebaker Museum.  They looked so good!!!  And I can picture this one looking like that again too.

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I met with Kevin Kerbitz and members from the Flint Historical Society Saturday morning where they got the first look at the wagon.  They were very excited with the inspection.  

 

The current consensus is that  there is no reason to restore the wagon at this time. There is value in keeping it as is,...kind of.

 

The only thing that was talked about  was changing the floor boards and a couple of supports because the floor of the wagon had been spliced in / patched years ago and a couple of the lower supports for the floor boards were rotted away.

 

There was no decision made at this time and since there is no hurry to do anything soon it was just put off for further discussion and to bring in some more expertise including the Sloan Museum.

 

Remember,   It is ORIGINAL only ONCE.  :)

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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Dandy Dave, the wagon looks great!  So impressive to see the paint detail that's survived, especially in the wheels and rear axle!  Thank you for all you did to make this happen.  It will look great inside the old carriage factory once the rennovation is complete.  

 

Thanks also to Dave Langdon for bringing this to our attention, to Larry Schramm for his time, talent, and trailer, to Brian Heil for driving out with Larry to get it, to Nick Branoff for making the donation for fuel, to GM for the use of the truck, and to David White and Leroy Cole of the Genesee County Historical Society for other travel expenses.  My apologies if I missed anyone.

 

Now, a little gentle cleaning (or power wasing as appropriate), some historical research, an assessment of how far to go with repair, and little more sweat and toil to get it ready for display in Flint . . . the epicenter of the automotive industry!

 

Kevin

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Yep I learned about all the above plus "a body in motion will remain in motion unless acted upon by another external motion" when at the age of 9 I made a motor cycle using a bicycle, a lawnmower motor, a fan belt and pulley, but the contraption I rigged to disengage said pulley and fan belt didn't work. Hence the black berry patch that was growing over the 4 ft ditch became the area of "impact"

LOL.. I hates them prickers... So glad you survived Mr. Earl.

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Why you are Quite Welcome Kevin. So glad that it was something that I recognized as being significant to the heritage of GM. So Glad that there are folks out there that paid the Dues to get it back  home where it belongs. I could not have done it alone. What can I say other than some things are meant to be. I recognized what it was and started the ball rolling. Everything came together and the rest is history. Now to find a Dort Carriage. :D . Dandy Dave!     

  

Dandy Dave, the wagon looks great!  So impressive to see the paint detail that's survived, especially in the wheels and rear axle!  Thank you for all you did to make this happen.  It will look great inside the old carriage factory once the rennovation is complete.  

 

Thanks also to Dave Langdon for bringing this to our attention, to Larry Schramm for his time, talent, and trailer, to Brian Heil for driving out with Larry to get it, to Nick Branoff for making the donation for fuel, to GM for the use of the truck, and to David White and Leroy Cole of the Genesee County Historical Society for other travel expenses.  My apologies if I missed anyone.

 

Now, a little gentle cleaning (or power wasing as appropriate), some historical research, an assessment of how far to go with repair, and little more sweat and toil to get it ready for display in Flint . . . the epicenter of the automotive industry!

 

Kevin

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Oh, Ohhh . Thank you all so much. :D  Did I mention that I also rescue old, and out of the ordinare, Caterpillar Road Graders as well? http://forums.aaca.org/topic/262412-video-one-of-the-machines-that-built-our-highway-system/

That is 11 tons of Iron right there. Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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