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1940 Packard 120 Convertible Restoration


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  • 3 weeks later...
Front lower cowl side welded in. 

 

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For the quarter panel, I modified a set of panel clamps for a tighter gap between the panels. The "divider" piece was originally ~.045", which I ground down to around .020". I also tried Robert/MP&C's tack/planish/grind/overlap technique since I was able to access the back side of the panel.  Great technique that really helps to reduce shrinking/warpage and keep the shape of the panel while welding.  It'll only need minimal work to get it ready for bodywork. 

 

For those not familiar with Robert (MP&C on forums), here's a link to check out his work. Very talented metal shaper and he's great at posting his techniques. 

 


 

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Got the passenger side quarter panel and B-pillar bottom cut out and cleaned up.  There was a turn signal stalk and a few other random pieces of metal brazed onto the B-pillar to help strengthen the rusted out section.  I'll get it outside when the weather clears up and use the spot blaster to finish stripping the B-pillar.

 

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Same thread I posted, different forum.  I always look forward to updates on the '55 project. 

 

 

OK, that does it. In the future, I'm going to read a post before I comment on it.

 

:rolleyes:

 

This Packard is really being done right. Thanks for showing us how.

Edited by BillP (see edit history)
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astronaut, I've been impressed with your metal work, to say the least! 

 

Do have a question regarding tack/planish/grind/overlap technique. When you planish, are you working the weld bead while still hot? What is the object of the planishing - to just basically hammer the weld bead to remove stresses caused by the weld, or are you trying to actually move the sheetmetal? I did look at Robert's posts on the Chevy/GMC truck forum but really it really did not answer my question (or I didn't know enough to understand the answer  :)).

 

Thanks for any enlightenment you can provide.

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OK, that does it. In the future, I'm going to read a post before I comment on it.

 

:rolleyes:

 

This Packard is really being done right. Thanks for showing us how.

 

Appreciate it! He's posted on a few different forums, and I like reading differnt posts of the same build since different forums have people asking him different questions.  

 

 

astronaut, I've been impressed with your metal work, to say the least! 

 

Do have a question regarding tack/planish/grind/overlap technique. When you planish, are you working the weld bead while still hot? What is the object of the planishing - to just basically hammer the weld bead to remove stresses caused by the weld, or are you trying to actually move the sheetmetal? I did look at Robert's posts on the Chevy/GMC truck forum but really it really did not answer my question (or I didn't know enough to understand the answer  :)).

 

Thanks for any enlightenment you can provide.

 

Thanks!  The purpose of planishing the welds is to reverse the shrinking that happens when you weld.  On any panel, but especially a crowned panel like the quarter, welding (shrinking) will cause a low spot.  If I had welded the whole panel end to end without planishing it would be warped (shrunk) along the weld seam, even only doing one spot at a time and allowing it to cool between welds.  That would take quite a bit of planishing to get the weld seam stretched back into shape.  Heat shrinking the metal around the weld seam might get any "oil canning" out but on a crowned panel shrinking will make low spots- you lose the contour of the panel.  It's easier and quicker to planish/stretch each tack weld as you go, and it's easier to control how much you're stretching the metal back into shape.  You're not really moving the metal in or out, since you use the "hammer on dolly" method to "squeeze" the metal outward to stretch the weld bead.  Since both panels had the correct shape to begin with, stretching only the weld area will correct the shape of the panel.  

 

Most guys heat shrink around the welded area to "fix" the warpage but you can't really fix a problem caused by shrinkage by shrinking it more. That's like the guy who said, "I cut it three times and it's still to short"! 

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r1lark, on 05 Nov 2015 - 06:49 AM, said:r1lark, on 05 Nov 2015 - 06:49 AM, said:

astronaut, good explanation. I understand now what is going on and what the planishing is accomplishing. But one more question - how do you know how much planishing is enough on each tack?

 

By checking the shape of the panel, and also judging by how tight or loose the panel felt- if it was wanting to oil can or not.  The nice thing about doing each tack is that you're going to do another tack overlapping the last, so if you over-stretch a spot the next weld will shrink that spot again.  You're not trying to get it perfect while welding, you'll still have some finishing to do once it's all welded.  This gets it much closer to start with though.

Edited by theastronaut (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...
Built the passenger side inner A-pillar bottom today.  Started by making a tape template, and fineline tape to cleanly mark the center edges where the new pieces will be welded. 

 

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Cut out new pieces from 16 gauge steel. 

 

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Shaped.

 

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Two halves welded, and started smoothing the welds with a cutoff wheel. 

 

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Welds smoothed with a cutoff wheel, then 36 grit. 

 

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Final smoothing with 80 grit on the 3" grinder, then 60 grit on a 3" DA sander.  Corners of the opening were squared up with a file. 

 

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And finished. 

 

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one more.......  unbelievable work!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

I have been loving this thread.  Cant wait every week to see the updates.  Your skill and craftsmanship is an enjoyment to watch.  Thank you for posting all your hard work.

 

Great workmanship!

 

 

Appreciate the comments!!

 

 

Started on getting the passenger side inner rocker in the proper location, and the inner A-pillar located. 
 
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Made templates for the rear fenderwell brace.  I'll get them cut out and welded up after lunch. 
 
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Durant28, on 20 Nov 2015 - 09:55 AM, said:

Only thing I have to say is your witnessing a true craftsman! Something not often seen these days of throw away and replace body work.  I wished I was that talented and I really enjoy seeing the restoration process. Thanks for posting it.

 

Thanks Durant28!

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Started on the A-pillar cover, needs final trimming and matching the hole sizes still. 

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Also started on the B-pillar bottom.

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I half-rounded the mating edges on both pieces and ground the edges for a tight gap.  Then did a few tacks to keep it in alignment. 

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Instead of doing a tack at a time I did a series of tacks in a row, only slightly letting off the trigger between tacks and overlapping.  Seemed to make a slightly shorter weld bead and good penetration.

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After smoothing the welds.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Roughed in the rockers, used the bead roller to make the curved 90* edges first.  I need to smooth the sharp edges on the dies, they leave marks in the metal that I dont' like.  It also distorts the edge some, requiring some time on the shrinker/stretcher to make the edge straight again. 

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Halves matched up and clamped in place.

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Tacked together, then the seam was lightly planninshed on a T-post dolly to true the edges.

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Fully welded/smoothed.

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As I scrolled thru todays update I was thinking "just amazing" and see that someone posted the same thought. If I could pick a show designed around my own interest it would have you making a piece from nothing much of a pattern and fitting it back where it belongs. I've done a bit of metal fab work on my van project removing rust, a bit of patching or grafting but nothing like what you've demonstrated in your updated. There have only been a few peoplethat have posted their projects and updates here showing these kinds of skills and I look forward to all of them as it gives me more knowledge and insight for my own projects. Great job. Scott...

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As I scrolled thru todays update I was thinking "just amazing" and see that someone posted the same thought. If I could pick a show designed around my own interest it would have you making a piece from nothing much of a pattern and fitting it back where it belongs. I've done a bit of metal fab work on my van project removing rust, a bit of patching or grafting but nothing like what you've demonstrated in your updated. There have only been a few peoplethat have posted their projects and updates here showing these kinds of skills and I look forward to all of them as it gives me more knowledge and insight for my own projects. Great job. Scott...

I agree wholeheartedly. This is wonderful to watch. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
GARY F, on 10 Dec 2015 - 4:34 PM, said:

you are amazing with that work

 

Thanks Gary!

 

 

Scotts_DG8, on 10 Dec 2015 - 8:47 PM, said:

As I scrolled thru todays update I was thinking "just amazing" and see that someone posted the same thought. If I could pick a show designed around my own interest it would have you making a piece from nothing much of a pattern and fitting it back where it belongs. I've done a bit of metal fab work on my van project removing rust, a bit of patching or grafting but nothing like what you've demonstrated in your updated. There have only been a few peoplethat have posted their projects and updates here showing these kinds of skills and I look forward to all of them as it gives me more knowledge and insight for my own projects. Great job. Scott...

 

I appreciate the comment Scott!

 

 

Landman, on 11 Dec 2015 - 07:26 AM, said:

I agree wholeheartedly. This is wonderful to watch. 

 

Thanks!

 

 

I started fitting the middle and rear floor pan sections last week.  The edges needed trimming, indentions were added for the body mount bolts/washers, the outside rear corner was trimmed to fit around the inner fenderwell, and I also started drilling for plug welds.

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I also offset the end of the rocker to make the B-pillar bottom fit flush.  This seam will be leaded over once it's welded in.  With the rocker offset finished I can extend that end of the rocker rearward 8-10", and that will finish the rocker. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I was thinking about your project and realized that it was coming up on a whole month since you last updated this. I'm assuming that the holidays played a roll in maybe a good portion of the time span but maybe you're on an extended holiday. No matter, take however much time you need. Just passsing on a note of interest, so whenever you get a bit of time to provide an update. there are a number of us here that will be looking forward to it. Scott...

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Hey Astronaut , I'm with Scott, this is a tv show I'd watch!

From a pure 'this is nuts' perspective (to remove any doubt, that's a compliment!), I haven't had this much fun watching since  Foxhole played with a 1958 Biarritz. I never cease to be amazed by others talents exhibited on this forum .

 

Keep it coming in any event...please!

 

Brad

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I was thinking about your project and realized that it was coming up on a whole month since you last updated this. I'm assuming that the holidays played a roll in maybe a good portion of the time span but maybe you're on an extended holiday. No matter, take however much time you need. Just passsing on a note of interest, so whenever you get a bit of time to provide an update. there are a number of us here that will be looking forward to it. Scott...

 

Sill working on it, just been slack on posting progress pics. Most of what I've done lately is boring/repetative stuff copied from the other side, so I haven't documented it like I normally would have.  I've also been busy with other projects in the shop; those sometimes take time away from the Packard. We're finishing up an underhood restoration of a matching numbers '72 El Camino, and recently finished a '51 Farmall Cub tractor full restoration. I'll include a few pictures of those project as well.  

 

Appreciate the continued interest! 

 

 

Hey Astronaut , I'm with Scott, this is a tv show I'd watch!

From a pure 'this is nuts' perspective (to remove any doubt, that's a compliment!), I haven't had this much fun watching since  Foxhole played with a 1958 Biarritz. I never cease to be amazed by others talents exhibited on this forum .

 

Keep it coming in any event...please!

 

Brad

 

Thanks Brad! 

Edited by theastronaut (see edit history)
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With most all of the new panel fabrication finished, I pulled everything back out to wash with PPG DX579 and DX520.  This cleans any light surface/fingerprint rust off from handling the parts while their bare metal and preps them for epoxy.  Forgot to get an after pic, this is before washing. The smaller parts were blasted before epoxy. 

 

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The center seam will be butt-welded down the length so it will apear as one piece.  To butt-weld a seal like this it'll need to be plannished like I did the quarter panel seam to eliminate any distortion.  I can't reach both sides so I'll need someone to hold the dolly on the other side.  I marked both sides with the same layout so we can both stay in the same place. 

 

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I've started welding in the floors and inner rocker, same process as the other side.  

 

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Before/After pics of the El Camino underhood restoration we just finished. This car had been painted and has new interior, but nothing had ever been done under the hood.  We took the front clip off and stripped it to the firewall and bare frame rails.  Susupension was rebuilt as well. 

 

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Thanks for the update. Even the parts in primer give the car some depth, it looking real good. The amount of work/hours that went into the El Camino I'm sure would surprise some but it sure shows.  And I don't know, but can a Farmall Cub tractor be described as cute?, that's how I see it at least. It's for sure has to be the little brother in the family. Like I mentioned if you have the time to post an update it would appreicated. I'm thinking most of us that like to follow this type of thread is im more awe of the work and quality being performed and what some might find as repetitive can be just as interesting as the the first post. Again, thanks. Scott...

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