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Being an antique now at least in California, I hope someone here has an idea about a brake problem. I'm not new to cars but my specialty is for older non-Ford models. This 1985 Mustang LX 5.0 Coupe that has been in my family since new has been parked since 2007 so, of course, I need to go through the brakes and the first thing I want to do is to replace the hoses. I'm sure they need replacing but even if they look okay, I would do it anyway.

However, I cannot understand why the pedal goes to the floor when the reservoir has fluid in it. If the hoses are plugged from age, I would still expect a hard pedal even if the brakes themselves don't work. This was my sister's car that she recently gave to me but she said, and all the invoices since new confirm it, that she has always had trouble with the brakes. I can see that the master was replaced several times even just immediately before she parked it and most everything else was replaced numerous times throughout its life. That aside, any ideas why the soft pedal now?

Edited by Packard Don (see edit history)

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Is the master cylinder leaking anywhere?  Do you see any signs of brake fluid leaks in and around the master cylinder?  Something I was thinking is maybe the pushrod seals inside the master cylinder are shot and have come apart causing them not to hold pressure when the brake pedal is applied.  Being that it has sat for 8 yrs I would remove the brake booster and master cylinder and take a look at those items for signs of leakage, old and expired seals and gaskets.  I believe there would also be a rubber vacuum line from the booster to the engine, investigate that as well.

 

Just some things I was thinking of.

 

Matt

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I see no sign of leakage and the master was replaced just before it was parked. Still, I was thinking along those same lines and just needed collaboration. The car isn't going to be driven any time soon but I would like it to have enough braking to be able to move it in and out of the shop relatively safely!

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Yep, I understand and agree w/ needing good brakes while moving the car around the shop/garage.  I would check everything brake related from the master and booster, both front brake hoses and calipers and both rear brake hoses and depending on if the rears are drums or discs check the wheel cylinders/calipers.  A lot of times the rubber seals in the wheel cylinders on drum equipped cars will develop a leak and/or the small piston within the wheel cylinder will become defective. 

 

But I would check all these things to rule everything out since it's been sitting so long.

 

Matt

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Yes, thank you. I've been working on vintage cars all my life and understand that. Any brakes is better than absolutely none as it has now, especially as it will not be driven but I agree with the need to eventually go through the whole system. I have a pressure flusher and bleeder too which will help.

Edited by Packard Don (see edit history)

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