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1931 American LaFrance Fire Truck


shadetree77
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Looks like a Standard rather than the Master as it does not have the cooling pipe normally present on the head at the drivers side.

I'm going with Master.

The water outlet on the Standard is at the front of the head. You can see in a couple of the pics there is no outlet at the front of the head.

The Master has the outlet water distribution pipe running along the top of the head on the opposite side to that you can see in the photos. Looks like some makeshift arrangement has been made up to replace the original water distribution tube and you can see it running from the radiator to about the middle of the head where they must have a distribution pipe of some sort.

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Also common to fire trucks is an auxilary cooler that used hydrant or tank water to pass through a heat exchanger in the upper or lower radiator hose. One can be seen on this engine. When the truck was stationary and not getting ram (down the road) air but pumping hard, these heat exchangers had the cold hydrant or tank pump water pass through them to help cool the engine. I've designed several over the years. Still used on fire trucks today.

I'm no early truck expert but I found it interesting that GMC was supplying chassis' to American LaFrance. I just assumed ALF built all their own.

The 6 cylinder Buick tooling going to GMC when the 1931 Buick 8s came out is well documented. GMC kept the Buick logo and saw it as a plus to have a Buick Engine under the hood, this also can be seen on this engine.

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  • 4 years later...

GMC used Buick engines frequently in the 1920s and 1930s as well as their own engines. Buick engines showed up in many HD and industrial application due to their reliability. I cannot think of a better engineered automobile engine of this area in terms of heavy duty design. Another feature that the Buick built GMC engines that are unique, would be the wide belt and pulleys along with a much heavier duty exhaust manifold. 

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