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Hi all, I am having a fuel pump problem and I am looking for a solution. I have a 1939 Dodge D11 2 door sedan with a 218 6 cylinder. I have replaced the tank and fuel lines rebuilt the fuel pump and had it up and running. At first it would run fairly well but at full speed it was starving for fuel until I would back it down a bit. The starvation got worse and now it won't run. It shows about 1 1/2 PSI before the inline filter not enough umph. I pulled the pump and the pump works by hand fine. I put a Dial on the cam lobe and it looks like there is only about .030 lift I am thinking, but not sure, that the lobe is worn out. The car is just a driver and I am looking for an inexpensive fix to get it running for the season. What is your opinion on the problem and solutions too? Thanks for your time and help!

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I remember back in the day,,,,,adding braze to the pump arm

to get enough stroke,,be careful it has enough travel and doesn't

bottom out,,

Wars and depressions will teach you lots,,,haha,,,Ben

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All of the above are great suggestions. I'll add that the flexible fuel line from the frame to the fuel pump will do exactly what you are describing. If you bought a NOS fuel line for it, it could useless (most of them are) because of age.

I should have been a little clearer. The flexible hose can collapse from age, though often only when there is suction on it. Once the suction is gone, it will go back to it's original round shape allowing you to see through it. Equally important, however, is that many of those vintage (but NOS) fuel lines are so brittle that they develop cracks from just bending snd installing them, thus causing the fuel pump to draw air instead of fuel.

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)
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Thanks to all of you for all the advice. I think I will try Cben09's suggestion to maybe get a few more miles out of her If that doesn't work, maybe it's time for an electric pump. Jfranklin what are you using for an electric pump and how does that work for you? The little rubber flex hose seems ok. I can see light through it. I have a spare so I'll give that a try too. I will let you all know what works and what didn't.

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Hi,,Another test,,take off gasline to carby,,

put chalkline on crank pulley

crank over engine several revs,,COUNT EM

How much gas was pumped

Now take off pump and measure how much gas is pumped

w/ MAX stroke on pump,,by hand,,,

Camshaft at half speed,,try to get on engine pumping

equal to hand pumping,,that is,,,the no of strokes

Hand pumping will be long stroke

on engine will reflect the warn cam,if thats problem

Hope this is not too confusing,,,relax,,have a coffee

whatever,,Cheers,,Ben

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All of the above are great suggestions. I'll add that the flexible fuel line from the frame to the fuel pump will do exactly what you are describing. If you bought a NOS fuel line for it, it could useless (most of them are) because of age.

I should have been a little clearer. The flexible hose can collapse from age, though often only when there is suction on it. Once the suction is gone, it will go back to it's original round shape allowing you to see through it. Equally important, however, is that many of those vintage (but NOS) fuel lines are so brittle that they develop cracks from just bending snd installing them, thus causing the fuel pump to draw air instead of fuel.

Hudsy Wudsy You were the winner in this Dilemma. Your assessment was spot on. Problem solved, I tried your solution first since it was the easiest to replace. I have several additional rubber flex hoses. It now runs smooth and flawlessly. Thank you to all for your excellent guidance.

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