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Mpgp1999

1926 split rims?

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Thank you Machinist_Bill. My hope of course is that the antique automobiles I care about can be maintained as the pieces of history they are (with their proper original type wheels) and that people are not hurt in the process because they can be informed of a serious potential risk.

My opinion is that this is one of the areas in life where intelligence and education are the solution, not hiding from the problem by ignoring it or throwing it away.

R.White, I imagine it is the snap "ring" that you are referring to as "broken"? My guess is that it is just slightly over three inches short. That would be the mathematical equivalent of a one inch smaller diameter wheel. Someone in the car's (wheel's?) past has probably replaced a bent or otherwise damaged or lost ring with one from a one inch smaller wheel.

While one could maybe get away with it, it is not good advice to run a wheel with a ring that is too short by about three inches. So you should try to find a ring that fits correctly. Rings commonly came in diameter sizes all the way from 14 inch clear up to around 30 inch rim size (not to be confused with the tire's outside size). A model T Ford's 30X3.5 tire for instance is a 23 inch rim size. Many larger Horseless Carriages used 34X4 (26 inch rim size) with some using even larger sizes. Farm implements go even larger. 19, 20, 21, and 23 inch rim sizes are very common for automobiles of the 1920s. 18 and 22 inch rim sizes were around, but fairly rare (I am well aware of the rarity of 22 inch as I used to have a '25 Pierce Arrow series 80 that used them). Almost every inch size was used by someone, as well as a few odd in-between sizes.

Beyond the diameter or circumference size of the ring, there are numerous other factors for a proper fit. These things should be evaluated by someone with a proper background. Basically, these are matters of size and shape of the ring and how it fits into the groove in the wheel/rim. Not only the depth and width of the groove, but the angles of how it fits into the groove must be considered.

Finding good rings is getting difficult. Too many have been thrown away for many years, out of fear. Also, a lot of people that do have them do not want to take them to swap meets out of fear of responsibility if they sell them. So ask around. If you find one that is the correct size, and the fit is really good, you probably made a good find.

Good luck! And do be careful.

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Thank you wayne. The ring is actually broken; it has a ragged edge to the break. One can only speculate how it happened but it worries me that few individuals these days even realise the dangers. (I didn't and I have had vintage cars for 40 years). The chances of finding an undamaged ring here in the U.K. are pretty slim but I will have a look for one at Beaulieu Autojumble this year.

Ray. <script type="text/javascript" src="safari-extension://com.ebay.safari.myebaymanager-QYHMMGCMJR/7a805d7e/background/helpers/prefilterHelper.js"></script>

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"Actually broken"? That IS interesting.

I do have to say that there are repair options that should be highly advised against. A few years ago, I was considering making a short piece and welding it onto a ring that was too small but otherwise fit really well. Fortunately, I found a truly proper ring and did not need to do that.

I was taught early to "NEVER STRAIGHTEN A BENT OR TWISTED RING". But if antique cars are going to be maintained and driven occasionally? Damaged rings will have to be repaired and straightened for some of them. I have straightened several myself. I expect to have to straighten a few more. If I can't find what I need for my son's car, I am even considering a way of making the three we need for it.

Any sort of welding or heating of rings should be done by someone with a little more than average welding and metallurgical background.

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Hello I have the owner of the wheel have brought it to someone with 40+ years of experience he says it is perfectly fine and I will be running it as my spare

I can post more pictures if necessary

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Also I have the tire there is 2 inches shorter than with Im going to use it as an emergency spare with that work?

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Here's the dangerous Bas$%&Ds that gave split rims a bad name.. Had a neighbor that broke both arms fixing one back in the 1960's. He walked around for weeks in slings. When he went to the bar, he always had a good looking chic hanging around to tip his glass, and hold his cigarette for him, and also help him to aim when the time came. LOL. Dandy Dave!

http://www.fatfenderedtrucks.com/widowmaker.html

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)

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Thanks so much for the detailed information on these! It is very timely for me since I am getting ready to mount a new spare tire on a Dodge disc wheel. It did not occur to me that this could be a dangerous operation. Is there any benefit to using a soapy water solution to help the tire bead slide over against the ring (instead of popping over)?

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^ Regarding soapy water......must be because our old fashioned service station in town uses soapy on every tire they change.

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As a teenager, my first 'proper' job was in our local Tyre and battery centre (see how we spell tire and center?) and I don't recall seeing anything with a split rim but we only did cars and by the 1970's almost everything was tubeless. The only real risk I can remember was if a tyre was grossly over inflated. Someone left the airline on one and it exploded - but apart from a ringing in the ears, luckily, no one was hurt.

Being a trainee soaping the beads was one of the little jobs I was given; that and making the tea!

They still use soapy water today.

Ray.<script type="text/javascript" src="safari-extension://com.ebay.safari.myebaymanager-QYHMMGCMJR/c60de1a/background/helpers/prefilterHelper.js"></script>

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Had a local guy here working on a large truck tire. Georges Auto and Truck Repair. Hillsdale N.Y. Was a tire from an 18 wheeler a number of years ago. Had a cage but did not use it this particular day. These large truck tires are commonly 90 to 110 LBS Times Atmospheric pressure. A piece of the sidewall blew out and hit him in the chest. He was flown to Albany med via helicopter but he did not make it. Good guy with a promising future. One stupid mistake and everything was over. Need I say more? The truckers that lined up for his going away party was almost unreal. And I was one of them. Also wrote a eulogy of sorts.. Days that I would rather forget. Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)

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As stated before.

The early auto rims are quite different than the big truck rims. These rims were designed to be taken apart and tubes repaired with basic tools and a simple air pump. With the lock ring style the ring may pop off when you are getting to the last few inches when removing it.

The broken lock ring most likely happened when someone was prying incorrectly trying to remove it.

Pinched fingers are the biggest concerns I have

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I took the ring off myself needed no tolls not under pressure no nothing

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