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Wood Grain Restorations?


Jdee
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I'm A bit confused as to what a 100 point car would be.<BR>Restored like factory new , Or way better than factory new.<P>I restore auto interior parts that are wood grained. Many Packards I get in have slight indentations on the glove box doors from the tack welds on the back, and these do show on original pieces, So we leave them there and woodgraining them. But some customers tell me that a 100 point cars need these removed, because they look like dents or dings.<BR>Also on many cars the wood grain was not put on areas of the dash that do not show,<BR>and again customers tell me that 100 point cars needs this done.<BR>I have original wood grained parts that clearly show blending of the woodgraining<BR>in certain areas, and on a restoration I'm told they can not be seen.<BR>Also I'm told the clear coat needs to look like glass. <BR>I'm getting this feed back mostly from restoration shops I deal with.<P>I know that the original pieces did not look like this. <BR>But if this is what is needed for a 100 point restoration, it is no problem with modern materials.<P>Now on the other hand when I was in Hershey this year, people at the show said that my clear<BR>coat needs to be a bit less glossy. And some pointed out that they could not see any blending on <BR>some of our pieces, and that their car had big blending areas from the factory....<P>So I guess I need to know How do Judges Look at a wood grain restoration?<BR>Should it be way better that factory? With a super high gloss of the modern Urethanes?<P>Thank for any help with this Jdee<P><BR>PS:<BR>We do use the original process of contoured printing.<BR><p>[This message has been edited by Jdee (edited 01-21-2000).]

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Item 1 - AACA and most other clubs (even the Packard Club as of recent decisions) use a 400 point system. The CCCA may still use 100 points. It's been a very long time since 100 points was the top number.<P>Item 2 - The criteria for AACA and most clubs is as the car left the factory. For many cars particularly the classics, factory may be defined as the custom body builder. Each car is judged on this criteria and there is no comparison judging, i.e. we don't look at one car and compare it with another. There are no point deductions for over restoration, however, there are no advantages for overrestoration. There are point deductions for incorrect restoration.<P>Item 3 - There was no clearcoating (as we know it today) on the original woodgraining, however clearcoating is considered over restoration (no deduction but also no benefit); no clearcoating, i.e. as original, again no deduction. If the woodgraining is done in such a manner that it is different from factory application, and if the judges find it, there is a deduction.<P>Item 4 - Please note that these comments relate primarily to AACA judging and may or may not apply in some other clubs. As I understand it this criteria does not apply to judging at some concours meets, where overrestoration is highly regarded.<P>Hopefully this answers your questions, and they are certainly valid since this problem of overrestoration continues to plaque the hobby. Hopefully, there will be other responses. <p>[This message has been edited by ronbarn (edited 01-19-2000).]

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It sounds like the ever non-winning battle of trying to please everyone. My first suggestion would be to say that "you set the standards of your shop". You know that the glove boxes had the indents from seeing originals and graining did not roll under to the very eges of all dashes. I like all the old cars, but none more than to see and study a original. And that's the way they were. I believe when a shop or customer spends the monies and time that they have to, leaving something that looks poorly like a weld mark or blending feels improper.<BR> Ronbarn pretty well layed it on the line for you as far as AACA judging will view your work, and I agree that clearcoat was not used ( at least on lesser production vehicles ) but as to high end models, I believe they would have had. But this I,m sure is not a option for you. I also believe high gloss on, say a "40 Chevrolet or '38 Buick is incorrect. If clear had to be used I would prefer a semi finish.<P> I have heard you are performing fantasic workmanship and that you were under the wing of Benny. That's a great start right there and I wish you well. Again, I would do what you fell is correct and let overrestoration be a option to your customers.<P>Rick

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You guys made my day. Thanks for all the help.<BR>We will be trying out the AACA Library & Research Center<BR>for more info on some of the cars we do a lot of, just to have the documents on hand for our customers.<P>I was told there is a film out that has actual video of woodgraining being done in the factory.. If anyone knows the name of this film please let us know, we would love to see it.<BR>Thanks JDee

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