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Hello

I'm planing on driving my 1926 dodge on the roads everyday. I have been recommended marvel mystery oil to put in fuel but won't that gunk up the engine?

Does anyone know of a additive I co of put in?

Thank you

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I use about 4 ounces of MMO in my entire car collection with outstanding results. I also use Seafoam, a can. Every other fill up and I am often asked how my cars run so smooth. I have been doing the MMO for 25 years and the Seafoam for 7. The Seafoam keeps my gasoline fresh all year long. Wayne

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Lots of people swear by MMM. It was first sold about the time your car was built. You only need a little bit, not enough to cause smoke or plug fouling.

Leaded gas did not come out until several years later. You don't need leaded gas, or lead additive. If anything, today's gas is too high octane for your car.

Some people report smoother, cooler running and more power by adding kerosene stove oil or diesel fuel to the gas. 10% to 25%. Prevents vapor lock too.

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When your car was built virtually 100% of cars ran on unleaded gasoline and engines had compression ratio of 5:1 or less. GM and Dupont formed The Ethyl Corporation in 1923 to market tetraethyl lead as a gasoline additive to reduce "knock". Marketing of tetraethyl lead started in 1926 but leaded gasoline didn't really become dominate until the early 1940's when engines began to have "high compression" of 6:1 or above. Unleaded "white gas" continued to be sold at service stations up until the mid 1950's.

Use unleaded "regular" 87 octane and add MMO, kerosene or diesel to reduce the octane a bit. White gas was about 50 octane.

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Lots of people swear by MMM. It was first sold about the time your car was built. You only need a little bit, not enough to cause smoke or plug fouling.

Leaded gas did not come out until several years later. You don't need leaded gas, or lead additive. If anything, today's gas is too high octane for your car.

Some people report smoother, cooler running and more power by adding kerosene stove oil or diesel fuel to the gas. 10% to 25%. Prevents vapor lock too.

Rusty, wouldn't this 10-25% value apply, therefore, to fuel economy? How much do some people add?

Perry

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They add 10% to 25%. There was quite a bit of discussion on this last year. The highest amount, 25%, was reported by the owner of a 1932 Buick with 4.5:1 compression. He said he drove thousands of miles on the mixture, pulling a trailer some of the time. Another was the owner of a Buick straight eight from the forties who added 10% to combat vapor lock. This car had higher compression but not high by today's standards.

I don't know if they got better mileage but wouldn't be surprised if they did.

I got the idea from an English publication. Apparently they have been doing this over there for years.

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When your car was built virtually 100% of cars ran on unleaded gasoline and engines had compression ratio of 5:1 or less. GM and Dupont formed The Ethyl Corporation in 1923 to market tetraethyl lead as a gasoline additive to reduce "knock". Marketing of tetraethyl lead started in 1926 but leaded gasoline didn't really become dominate until the early 1940's when engines began to have "high compression" of 6:1 or above. Unleaded "white gas" continued to be sold at service stations up until the mid 1950's.

Use unleaded "regular" 87 octane and add MMO, kerosene or diesel to reduce the octane a bit. White gas was about 50 octane.

I have a friend that regularly drives (and has me drive) his three Ford model 'A' cars. He adds diesel fuel to the gasoline for his Model 'A' cars.

I use Marvel Mystery Oil in my gasoline (4 ounces MMO /fillup) for the Roadmaster. It cuts down on vapor lock

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  • 2 weeks later...

If you mean driving to work, say 5 miles or less on surface streets at speeds no higher than 30 - 45 MPH go for it, as long as you have a modern backup just in case of bad weather or a breakdown.

Just tune it up and maintain it by the book. Grease it every 1000 miles change oil every 2000. You may have a few troubles at first but should be ok.

If you mean to treat it like a modern car and commute 50 miles a day at 70 MPH it won't do it.

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Any recommendations for driving dally and putting a lot of stress and usage on the car?
If you mean driving to work, say 5 miles or less on surface streets at speeds no higher than 30 - 45 MPH go for it, as long as you have a modern backup just in case of bad weather or a breakdown.

Just tune it up and maintain it by the book. Grease it every 1000 miles change oil every 2000. You may have a few troubles at first but should be ok.

If you mean to treat it like a modern car and commute 50 miles a day at 70 MPH it won't do it.

you'll have better luck driving it regularly than if you let sit for weeks at a time.

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I put 401,000 miles on my Pontiac (in 56 years) after my Grandfather put 99,000 miles on it (in 29 years). I drive on our main highways and your interstates, in the mountains and in the desert, from -54 degrees one winter in Manitoba to 104 degrees in Nevada. Only ever three breakdowns on the road. One a broken axle shaft (1947 hammer welded by an old time black smith, and still in the car), one a burned out rod (1958) and one when my pressure plate disintegrated (1987 the day after I had been pulling stumps with the car). They were made to be driven anywhere anytime. I agree with bhambulldog, they run way better when they are driven regularly.

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Howdy everybody, What type of fuel or mixture for use in old cars is often an interesting discussion. Many times MMO or Diesel or Kero is recommended as a "Shandy" for vintage low comp engines or those susceptible to vapour lock. Anybody have any thoughts though on using a modern synthetic Two Stroke oil as an additive. Also these modern synthetic two stroke oils do not emit smoke ??

R

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Howdy everybody, What type of fuel or mixture for use in old cars is often an interesting discussion. Many times MMO or Diesel or Kero is recommended as a "Shandy" for vintage low comp engines or those susceptible to vapour lock. Anybody have any thoughts though on using a modern synthetic Two Stroke oil as an additive. Also these modern synthetic two stroke oils do not emit smoke ??

R

I've not heard that before.

That seems a good idea

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