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Upset and bummed because I missed another car for sale


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I don't know why I'm writing this other than maybe writing my frustration in this forum will somehow help me cope with my disappointment. A heads up here, my grammar is not the best, but I think you will get my story.

A little over a week ago I called about another car that has long been a dream of mine (two other cars I was planning to look at ended up with this very same scenario). I couldn't believe that it wasn't sold and it was exactly what I have been looking for. The other two cars were close, but not like this past car. After talking with the owner for about half an hour discussing the vehicle I was very stern about viewing the car before I would purchase it, but explained I was certain I'd buy the car if everything was as it was stated in the ad. I also told them that I would give them a call after I had made arrangements to get off work to go and inspect the car. Unfortunately, I live in Ohio and the car was located in Florida, so taking off for work was going to be a challenge because we are busy this time of year, not to mention Easter was that weekend also. I was able to arrange time off to go look at the car on a last minutes notice. Great!! I was pumped and looking forward to the trip. Last Sunday night (Easter) I called the owner to tell them of my plans to see the car only to find out the car was purchased sight unseen the day after I called about the car. This isn't the car I've been looking for, but the way it was purchased was much like this car was F/S 1959 Plymouth Fury Sport Coupe Factory ICE COLD A/C So I ended the call very disappointed that I didn't do more, but what could I have done?

About five years ago I was looking at purchasing what I thought might have been my dream car off ebay. This car was also in Florida (BTW I'm not thinking much of this state right now) LOL, anyway I went down to look at the car before the auction was up, WOW what a piece of crap. I was glad I didn't buy the car sight unseen. It would have been a big mistake that I probably would have never recouped from.

I believe this past car was purchased by another dealer only to have the price jacked up to the point where it is out of my reach. The owner said that the gentleman wouldn't be able to pick the car up until next Friday (which happened to be the day that I'd arrive) because he had another car to pick up during the week. Now I don't condemn the dealer for making a living, but how is a 40 year old with a job and family supposed to compete with these type of tactics if you will? I am just literally tired of trying to be the first to look at the ads, be the first to call, searching the web for the car that I'd like to own. There are thousands of these cars out there, but it sure does seem impossible to purchase the one I'd like.

I don't expect everyone to understand or relate, but I find it hard to believe that I'm the only one with these experiences.

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Rich people problems.

Don't worry there are millions more cars where those ones came from.

Enjoy the hunt, you will win in the end and the victory will be all the sweeter.

I think everyone who reads these columns has gone through something similar. Try and put it in perspective, and don't let it get you down.

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Having sold, or advertised things on Craigslist, or in the paper, one in the hand is worth two in the bush. People will call, say they'll come by, then flake. If a buyer comes by with funds in hand, a seller will take. (If I understand your question)

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Think how safe you are by looking over your purchases beforehand!

In many cases, you save yourself thousands, or tens of thousands,

of dollars by seeing what you are buying--avoiding honest misinterpretations

and occasional downright fraud. So overall, you are probably 'way ahead.

And don't get your heart so set on one particular year or model! Once I sat

down and wrote a list of all the cars in my price range I would enjoy; I ended

up with more than 50. Some may be currently popular, some may be totally

overlooked. Enjoy the overlooked ones, too, as there isn't nearly as much demand.

You can take the kids out for ice cream on a sunny spring day and have as much

fun in your Rambler wagon or your Olds 88 as you could in your 409-V8 Chevy convertible,

your Cutlass 4-4-2, or your Cadillac V16. And for many, many cars, it remains a buyer's market.

The money you DON'T spend on cars will eventually buy you much, much more

if it's saved and properly invested over the decades.

And here's a way to handle cars that may sell fast: Send a deposit on the car,

making clear it is a REFUNDABLE deposit if you're not satisfied. Then have a

fellow club expert living close to the car go examine it for you. Quite a few

hobbyists work this way.

And if you really got everything you wanted, you wouldn't be one whit happier

than you are now. Many people only think they would be, having never read

Ecclesiastes chapter 2.

Take heart! You haven't really lost a thing!

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If it's a car you really want, and pictures and description sound good, you have to act.

Wire or PayPal a deposit, 300 to 500, don't make a big deal about refundable or not, go inspect car, if not as described ask for deposit back. If you lose it, so be it.....

About 15 years ago I called on an early Pierce Arrow, a 1909... A project, but all there.....guy wanted 30k, but as soon as we started talking, he said he didn't want to deal with it anymore, and would take 20k right now....and like a fool I asked him to email me pictures, when I should have just said I'll take it....conversation on a Friday afternoon, Saturday morning I called him to buy...and it was gone. My one real chance at an early Pierce, and hesitation lost it.

The point is, if it's a desirable car at a fair price, do something to give yourself first chance at it....

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Over the years I have established a maximum dollar amount that I figure I can lose annually without causing a domestic crisis. It tends to increase every year. Anyway, I'll shoot from the hip on the sight unseen or the mystery pile to that amount, knowing that it is really hard to have a 100% loss. Just off the top of my head two 12 cylinder Jaguars and my Park ave convertible came home that way in recent years. The Jags are gone and left a profit.

The best way to look at it is through the lifespan rather than the individual exchange. In general most of us old guys should be way ahead of the game. Say you are mid-60's and the social security has you pegged for $2,000,000 in your life's income. If you were able to skim off 8-10% for the hobby plus the buy, sell, exchange deals related to it, you should end up with the change and residuals of a couple hundred thousand in your garage. An older guy can reflect on that and a younger guy can use it as a guideline.

I'm 66. The cardiologist, the GP, and I are in agreement that I can plan on another 40 (don't be disappointed if I don't make it, but plan it). Just need a bigger garage. Oh, still working too, I just took a break.

Bernie

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I believe this past car was purchased by another dealer only to have the price jacked up to the point where it is out of my reach. The owner said that the gentleman wouldn't be able to pick the car up until next Friday (which happened to be the day that I'd arrive) because he had another car to pick up during the week.

Wait ... if I'm understanding correctly, the car has been "sold", but NOT picked up or finalized? If so ... then GO, particularly if it is the day you'd arrive. Get there when they open ... & check it out. Cash/money in hand talks. Just a thought, anyway.

Rich people problems.

Ha ... that thought crossed my mind, too!

Don't worry there are millions more cars where those ones came from.

Enjoy the hunt, you will win in the end and the victory will be all the sweeter.

I think everyone who reads these columns has gone through something similar. Try and put it in perspective, and don't let it get you down.

EXACTLY!!!!! I've lost out on some cars I wanted to buy, but ... turns out ... it was a good thing.

Cort :)www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve

"Put off today what you can do tomorrow, sometimes you don't do the thing" __ Diamond Rio __ 'In A Week Or 2'

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With all due respect there is a saying that is applicable. If you snooze you lose ! I don't blame the seller for not holding it without a guarantee or deposit and I don't blame the dealer for being in opportunist ! Your track record suggests that your present Mode of buying is not working and if you want to be successful you can't continue to drag your butt. I buy lots of cars for my private collection and I have learned that

timing is everything ! Just my humble opinion. Wayne

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Other side of the coin. I advertised a 54 Stude for sale. Guy called and said he wanted it at my price and would be there in two hours and would I promise to hold it for him. I said I would. About an hour later another guy showed up and said he wanted it. I explained the situation. He offered more than I was asking. I said I had given my word to the other guy. He hung around until the first guy showed up then got in my face about it and offered even more right in front the buyer. Then he got in the buyers face and offered him even more. The buyer declined. Then he actually threatened both of us. After I offered to call the cops and let them sort it out he left. Weird situation but a promise is a promise.............Bob

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"If you snooze you lose," one saying goes.

But is it accurate in this case? Is being safe

and prudent in a 5-figure purchase snoozing?

I'd say it's being awake and alert. Impulse buys often

lead to regrets, or a feeling of elation that soon wears off.

And, as everyone knows, the occasional fraudster often DEPENDS

on your making impulse buys and not thinking thoroughly.

We're here to cheer up Mr. Buicknewbee, as he asked!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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OK here's yet another side of the coin. I bit on a Hemming's add for a 55 Century Convert. They sent pictures, described it "turn key" etc etc. I drove 14 hours to make the deal. There was no battery in the car, the engine looked like it hadn't run in years, at least 1/2" thick layer of NEW under coat on everything, and the pix they sent weren't even of the SAME CAR. Lesson learned. You did the absolutely correct thing Mr. Buicknewbee..................Bob

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When looking for my first pre-war car, I went to see a certain

roadster of a premium make. The seller was known in his marque club,

and he sent me pictures. The car looked nice in the pictures, and I knew

it needed a few things to finish it.

Never a sight-unseen buyer, I was glad I saw it!

The seller was honest, but it was the worst restoration I have ever seen.

Yes, it was an achievement for the amateur restorer, but the quality was

poor. The pictures didn't show bubbles in the paint, unfilled rust pits

below the paint on the wheels, nor all the lumps in the home-sewn top.

Old Cars Price Guide says a #4 condition car can be a very poor

amateur restoration, and that's exactly what this was! Just about

everything would have needed redoing. Imagine a newly restored car in #4 condition!

So don't envy someone who buys quickly. Don't berate yourself for taking no chances!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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"If you snooze you lose," one saying goes.

But is it accurate in this case? Is being safe

and prudent in a 5-figure purchase snoozing?

I'd say it's being awake and alert. Impulse buys often

lead to regrets, or a feeling of elation that soon wears off.

And, as everyone knows, the occasional fraudster often DEPENDS

on your making impulse buys and not thinking thoroughly.

We're here to cheer up Mr. Buicknewbee, as he asked!

and I agree we are here to offer advice and not candy coat. Bottom line he waited too long and lost for the third time. I can accept what you say but if you choose your strategy you should have no remorse when you miss out. I did say with all due respect !

wayne

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To my surprise I feel much better after writing this story up and hearing all the different approaches others have taken or not towards buying a classic car. It is a relieve to hear that others would have acted in the same manner that I did. I will certainly take this advice that all of you have provided me with and see if I can apply it in my next purchase.

Some questions have developed that I did not address. The car was indeed picked up the day that I had planned to look the car over, and I did follow up on the car (Friday the 10th) to see that the buyer had indeed showed up the day that he promised the owner he would. So I did make sure that the car did sell.

Indecently, the car that I had interest with on ebay was just as the gentleman Bhigdog experienced. It was so far from the description that I was just shocked. It was a total scam the dealership was pulling. I distinctly remember asking the salesman if any panels has been replaced on the car. He said he couldn't be sure, well let me tell you, if he couldn't genuinely see that the car had some panel replacement on the car then he had no business in that line of work. There was so much undercoating and bondo on the car it must have weighed an additional 200 pounds. They were asking a premium for the car too! I am sure someone probably got took on that car, but I'm glad it wasn't me.

That said, apparently I am going to have to broaden my idea of my dream car. It is just to desirable and expensive to have a good chance at acquiring one. There have been other cars recently that I did give a second look at that I didn't before, but I just wasn't ready to part with the money set aside for the car I really wanted. I think I'm ready now to have an open mind.

Thanks gents!

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You you can also avail yourself of the new friendships and have one of the members accompany you for an inspection or go independently and report back to you. Sometimes it may well save you a trip or help you get that car of your dreams. Sometimes even a $100 dollar deposit will hold a car until you arrive.

Wayne

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Buicknewbee

Keep looking, I was almost scammed trying to buy the car I thought I had to have. Luckily I got wise to the scam and didn't get taken. I kept looking and found something completely 180 degrees from where I had been going. Came from an Ebay listing and was honestly described. Just a very nice driver. But has been fun to own. Hang in there it will come.

Dale

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I have to agree with every comment Wayne has made on the topic. By the way my buddy had the 59 Plymouth for sale that was mentioned in the first post for about 8 months, had ads in all of the mags, had it at Hershey and had only two calls. The car was out there for some time, it sold from the AACA Classified Fourm in 2 days to a dealer, sight unseen, cash transfer and picked up all in 48 hours, and as I understand it, the car is up for sale now on ebay. So you did not miss out on your dream car it's still out there just not at the price it was.

Maybe an Auction is the right venue for you to find you car, this way you have a large selection, you can inspect the cars, and arrange transport

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This didn't happen to me but it did happen to my brother last fall.

He was looking for a C1 or C2 Corvette and had looked at a few but just couldn't find one in his price range or close enough to go look at.

Then one came up on Ebay which was only 45 minutes from him. It was a 62

He went and looked at it and then I went with him, too

He settled on bidding on the car and at the end he lost it by a few bucks.

He called me and was very discouraged, etc.....

I told him to relax and that some Ebay deals fall through. Of course he didn't want to hear it.

He called the woman who owned the car and let her know the situation and that he really wanted the car.

Lo and behold, the next day she called him and said the "dealer" backed out and it was his if he wanted it.

So, long story short, he got the Vette and for $3000.00 less than his original high bid.

This doesn't happen often but sometimes you get lucky.

As far as all the dealers trolling the marketplace, well, let's just say I can get into that (not in a good way) but I won't

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I'm not recommending that one buy a car sight unseen. I've done that three times, been lucky twice and burned (by a supposedly reputable dealer) once. What I AM recommending is put a deposit on the car, then go do your inspection. If you lose a few hundred dollars by not getting your deposit back, then it's not the end of the world, but at least you've locked in "first refusal".....

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good advice by Trim and Al

pull the trigger next time....................................................................................................................................

anyone I have been asked a million questions by ends up being a time waster-if you want it, small deposit as said and go get it-too many things to do? then dont buy it........................

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A number of years ago I answered a local add for a Model A sedan. I called the guy.asked several questions and was assured that the car was in good condition and that we could drive it. I drove nearly an hour and when I located the seller all I saw was a gutted sedan sitting on blocks in the front yard; I just kept driving. It always pays to look first!

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Buicknewbee,just curious where in Florida it was located. I live in Fla and have missed cars only miles away only to find out a good buddy who is no where close to the car scooped it up overnight!!! Ed Dade City,Fl

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I know Buicknewbee personally (he bought a car from me) and he's a smart buyer who knows his stuff--exactly the kind of buyer I want. He didn't waste my time, and while the weather conspired against us during the purchase process, he did everything right during our transaction.

That said, a deposit will always buy you time. In most cases, deposits are refundable (by me, anyway) if the car doesn't live up to expectations and I've somehow misrepresented it. I think most other sellers, private or dealers, would find it distasteful to keep a guy's money because the car didn't measure up, but if you can afford a collector car, a $500 hit probably isn't the end of the world if the seller won't cooperate. And remember that it's just as hard as a seller to separate the tire-kickers from the genuine buyers unless there's money on the table. In high-demand situations, buyers need to make their move quickly. I had that really nice 1966 Mustang GT fastback about a month ago. I had at least six guys hemming and hawing, making excuses, asking "Can you send me a picture of the third bolt back on the left front subframe, it looks weird," checking price guides, all of them standing around afraid to pull the trigger. After being on the market for four days, one guy called, said he'd like to put a deposit on it and he'd come look at it later in the week. He showed up with his expert in tow and bought the car instantly, no questions asked, at full asking price. The other guys suddenly got busy asking me what it sold for and did I have any others coming in and would I save the next one for them and if the deal fell through, would I sell it to them? Obviously, that buyer proved to them that the car was legit and they all regretted their hesitation.

Money talks, it's that simple. Deposits will usually buy you the first right of refusal. Take a chance with $500. You might have a slight chance that you'll lose the deposit (either because the car is junk or the seller won't refund it, or both), but you won't end up in this kind of situation if the car turns out to be just what you want. If a desirable car is priced attractively, it's not attractive just to you and you can't begrudge someone else--dealer or otherwise--from coming to the same realization that you did: Hey, that's a lot of awesome for not a lot of money!

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The dealership I speak of was near Tampa. I won't name them because I don't think one instance is a reason to give them a bad reputation, and I think Tampa probably has many dealerships to avoid picking one out. The car I missed was in Lake Mary or something like that near Orlando. My nana and grandpaw had a place in Zephyrhills near Dade city. Nice location! Been there. I miss the opportunity to go down whenever I got the urge.

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Buicknewbee, why don't you let us know what your dream car(s)

is (are)? Maybe, just maybe, someone here can help.

Consider this a WANTED ad!

I just know that many of you are going to role your eyes when I tell you, but here it is, a 57 Chevy Belair convertible! My idea of the perfect 57 chevy would be in original condition (Not restored, or body off) with perhaps just necessary maintenance performed over the years. A professional repaint would be ok as long as it wasn't peeling and chipping all over the place, but that makes it harder to spot rust and rot issues which brings me to a must. A must (which is near impossible to find especially on a convertible) would be a solid car with little or no rot. I'd rather have a car with paint issues rather than rot issues. Paint issues don't bother me at all since I am capable of resolving them, but I'm not looking for a project car either. My kids don't give me that much time. My color of choice would be either tropical turquois, harbor blue, or larkspur blue with a white power top, brakes, steering, and a powerglide transmission.

Three years ago I was thinking about a 57 chevy hardtop, and then I got to thinking about a convertible. I started to look at prices and there was just no way at that time. Actually, I had no idea if I'd even like to drive a convertible. I thought maybe I should look at perhaps another GM convertible. Yeah right! LOL there was still no way I would have one anytime soon to even realize if I liked the idea of driving with the top down. So I was just about to throw the idea out the window until Matt Harwood presented the idea of a 48 Plymouth convertible. He had one in his inventory for sale. Long story short we bought the car for less than half of what a gm convertible was going for. And heck, we could have fun with the kids and see if we did indeed like to ride in a classic convertible. The wife and I just adored the little car, and still to this day enjoy it frequently. Now that I know I like to ride in a classic convertible I am ready to take the plunge and get the car that I have always wanted. But the competition is just krazy! The last year has proved very hard to realize such a dream. Until this last car I didn't know if I would still even find what I'm looking for and willing to pay. But I'm thinking it was my chance and I blew it. Again, maybe it's time to re-think the 57 chevy convertible and maybe think or at least have an open mind towards another blue convertible of the same time period.

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The car was indeed picked up the day that I had planned to look the car over, and I did follow up on the car (Friday the 10th) to see that the buyer had indeed showed up the day that he promised the owner he would. So I did make sure that the car did sell.

Ah, OK. See ... I might've gone ahead & gone ... just in case. Sorry that it did sell.

a 57 Chevy Belair convertible! My idea of the perfect 57 chevy would be in original condition (Not restored, or body off) with perhaps just necessary maintenance performed over the years. A professional repaint would be ok as long as it wasn't peeling and chipping all over the place, but that makes it harder to spot rust and rot issues which brings me to a must. A must (which is near impossible to find especially on a convertible) would be a solid car with little or no rot. I'd rather have a car with paint issues rather than rot issues. Paint issues don't bother me at all since I am capable of resolving them, but I'm not looking for a project car either. My kids don't give me that much time. My color of choice would be either tropical turquois, harbor blue, or larkspur blue with a white power top, brakes, steering, and a powerglide transmission.

Thank you for telling us ... now we can watch, too!

Cort :)www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve

"I'll take a Chevrolet just any day" __ John Conlee __ 'Common Man'

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You guys are right about assuming too much although the seller told me that it was out in the front yard so I would know which house he lived in. It was the same body style and color that he described to me and that he only had the one car. I've had guys embellish their descriptions before just to get people to come and look. Don't have time for that! I had another instance when I went to look at a '36 Dodge in Columbus, Ohio. I made arrangements to meet the seller at his home , a 41/2 hour drive for me, at 6:00pm on a Sunday afternoon. I arrived at 5:30,Knocked at the door several times and nothing. I knew they were home as the front door was opened and I could see and hear them inside. He made me wait until 6 when he finally came to the door. He told me the car was not there but in a garage several miles away. He wanted me to follow him but because I was not familiar with the area I declined and asked why we just couldn't ride together. He got in a huff and told me he had to be somewhere at 6:30! I'm thinking why then did he agree to let me drive so far if he didn't have time to show the car. We did go to see the car; he opened the door, backed out the car and asked if I wanted it. I asked if we could drive it and he said no because he was going to be late. I just told him to forget it and we went back to his home. I was back on the road by 6:45. The car was not in the condition that he described to me and at $8,000 over 20 years ago was way too much money!

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True story. Many years ago a '31 Model A Vicky was advertised in the local paper. Dad called the guy as soon as we saw the ad and we hustled the 20 miles or so to where the car was. As we pulled up to the curb another local collector pulled up at the same time but we were out of our car and on the walkway to the house first so the second collector, being a gentleman, said we had first chance at the car. We all went around back of the house to see the A. Asking price was $1300. As we all were looking at the car the other collector said to the seller "If these folks don't take the car I'll take it for the $1300". Now Dad, being an incurable haggler, said to the owner "Will you take $1100?". "Sure" said the seller. The second collector wandered off muttering under his breath.

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I rebought a Model "A" Special Coupe from a guy that I had sold to him years before. It came with a bunch of new stuff and some early original parts that I needed for my pickup. I advertised the car and the parts that I didn't want in the local paper. Got several calls and a couple of folks came to look at it, then nothing. It sat here for over a year until one Saturday, out of the blue, a couple came and wanted to buy it for the asking price. He paid me and we loaded on his trailer and off he went. It wasn't 20 minutes later another guy shows up, also unannounced, and wanted to buy it. Told him sorry, but someone else just took it away. He got a little miffed but that was his problem. A phone call may have saved him the aggravation.

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I rebought a Model "A" Special Coupe from a guy that I had sold to him years before. It came with a bunch of new stuff and some early original parts that I needed for my pickup. I advertised the car and the parts that I didn't want in the local paper. Got several calls and a couple of folks came to look at it, then nothing. It sat here for over a year until one Saturday, out of the blue, a couple came and wanted to buy it for the asking price. He paid me and we loaded on his trailer and off he went. It wasn't 20 minutes later another guy shows up, also unannounced, and wanted to buy it. Told him sorry, but someone else just took it away. He got a little miffed but that was his problem. A phone call may have saved him the aggravation.

Happens all the time. All I need to do to get people in a buying mood and to start waving money in my face is to sell the car they want. It happens frequently--a car will sit for months and months then three or four guys will show up wanting to buy it all at once.

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It also happens with new cars at dealerships. Late Sept, early Oct. of 1966 my older sister decided she wanted a new car. Nothing fancy, just an unadorned car for basic transportation. I went to a dealer in Covington, VA and looked at a '66 Nova. They wanted about $50 less than the sticker price and they would not budge. Went home and the car was listed on the back page of the newspaper for almost $400 less than the sticker price. That was the price they were willing to sell for at noon but not at 3:30 that afternoon. Took her to Roanoke, VA and we looked at several cars. Made a deal for a Dodge Aspen and then were told the car was sold and they tried to put us in a used car with transmission problems. Told them no thank you. Went to a Chevy place and the salesman sent us to look a Nova Sedan. It had a huge dent in the right front fender where someone got careless backing the car off the carrier. We went into his office and made a deal. He'd put the car in the body shop Thursday and it would be ready to pick up on Friday. Nothing was ever said about a deposit but when he asked her how she wanted to finance the car she told him she would bring him a check for the full amount Friday. This was on Wednesday night. We walked out out of the showroom late that night and the salesman turned off the lights and locked the door behind us. We went to my car and he went to his car, talking as we went. Called him Friday to see if the car was ready and he said we didn't give him a deposit and someone came into his office after we left (lie! He left when we did) and gave him a deposit on the car and it was in the shop being fixed for them. Said to come back and we'd find something else. I have never been back to that place. She found something else, at a Ford dealership. Sorry guys, I had a senior moment when I was writing this. It was in 1976, not 1966. Recalled what a '66 Nova looked like and it was instantly, Me Bad!

Edited by john2dameron
llMemory playing tricks. (see edit history)
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It also happens with new cars at dealerships. Late Sept, early Oct. of 1966 my older sister decided she wanted a new car. Nothing fancy, just an unadorned car for basic transportation. I went to a dealer in Covington, VA and looked at a '66 Nova. They wanted about $50 less than the sticker price and they would not budge. Went home and the car was listed on the back page of the newspaper for almost $400 less than the sticker price. That was the price they were willing to sell for at noon but not at 3:30 that afternoon. Took her to Roanoke, VA and we looked at several cars. Made a deal for a Dodge Aspen and then were told the car was sold and they tried to put us in a used car with transmission problems. Told them no thank you. Went to a Chevy place and the salesman sent us to look a Nova Sedan. It had a huge dent in the right front fender where someone got careless backing the car off the carrier. We went into his office and made a deal. He'd put the car in the body shop Thursday and it would be ready to pick up on Friday. Nothing was ever said about a deposit but when he asked her how she wanted to finance the car she told him she would bring him a check for the full amount Friday. This was on Wednesday night. We walked out out of the showroom late that night and the salesman turned off the lights and locked the door behind us. We went to my car and he went to his car, talking as we went. Called him Friday to see if the car was ready and he said we didn't give him a deposit and someone came into his office after we left (lie! He left when we did) and gave him a deposit on the car and it was in the shop being fixed for them. Said to come back and we'd find something else. I have never been back to that place. She found something else, at a Ford dealership. Sorry guys, I had a senior moment when I was writing this. It was in 1976, not 1966. Recalled what a '66 Nova looked like and it was instantly, Me Bad!

I guess through all the years car salesmen have been let down so many times that they have just learned to sell to the one who first shows up with payment. Not quite the same situation since he said it was just after you left, but a gentleman's serious interest isn't worth much anymore.

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