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plymouthcranbrook

WWI Steam Tractors

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In England steam engines are nearly worshiped by their owners and rightfully so as they come only at great expense. A half million pounds and more is not uncommon and Showman engines go even higher.

I give the Brits a lot of credit as they really know how to play with their toys........and do!....... :D

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I especially like the steam lorry that appears at 1:20. I had never before seen a picture of a steam powered lorry.

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I had a short ride on a 'road locomotive' (a traction engine with rubber tyres like those in this clip) some years ago. Understandably the steam engine runs almost silently but there is a terrible cacophony from the exposed transmission gears which are above the rear wheels and very close to your elbow.

The showmans engine Quo Vadis - http://tractors.wikia.com/wiki/Burrell_no._3938 - (a road locomotive fitted with electrical generators and a rear mounted lifting crane) is currently on a tour of New Zealand and was at an event I attended just a couple of weeks ago.

Edited by nzcarnerd (see edit history)

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Quo Vadis bugged me enough to find out what this Latin term meant. Biblical, "where are you going". That might save somebody else the problem.

Al

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...The showmans engine Quo Vadis - http://tractors.wikia.com/wiki/Burrell_no._3938 - (a road locomotive fitted with electrical generators and a rear mounted lifting crane) is currently on a tour of New Zealand and was at an event I attended just a couple of weeks ago.
It may be at the Steam rally to be held at McLeans Island on 11 & 12 April (I will be there)

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I see a very long legged steering gear ratio,

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Steam traction engines need dozens of wheel turns lock-to-lock. That quip re arm strong is one I also use myself. An odd coincidence is that one British supplier of power steering components in the 1960s was Armstrong.

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Foden is a popular steam Road Wagon. They're out there. :cool: I use to see photos of them in the Gas and Steam Engine magazines I use to get. Dandy Dave!

https://www.google.com/search?q=foden+steam+wagon&biw=1600&bih=729&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=7m0WVY_QDuiwsASPvoLYCA&sqi=2&ved=0CB0QsAQ

Among the pictures on that Google link I saw what might have been the same WW1 truck as in the video and it led me to this page - http://hmvf.co.uk/forumvb/archive/index.php/t-25310.html? - most of which I have not yet read but looks to be some interesting stuff re WW1 vehicles. There were certainly large numbers of trucks left over after WW1 which were auctioned off and rebuilt to serve in the transport industry. I read somewhere that this contributed to a ten year stagnation of the British truck industry.

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This is the 1907 60HP Case engine I bought in April of 1989.

Chain steering is actually quite easy as long as whatever it is you are steering is moving.

When you see guys spinning the steering wheel like a Whirling Dervish you can tell they need more experience at the wheel.

One needs to start turning well ahead of the actual turn and as long as you don't try to over steer for your speed steering is quite easy........although I wouldn't want to make figure eights....... :rolleyes:

post-93523-14314304652_thumb.jpg

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This is the 1907 60HP Case engine I bought in April of 1989.

Chain steering is actually quite easy as long as whatever it is you are steering is moving.

When you see guys spinning the steering wheel like a Whirling Dervish you can tell they need more experience at the wheel.

One needs to start turning well ahead of the actual turn and as long as you don't try to over steer for your speed steering is quite easy........although I wouldn't want to make figure eights....... :rolleyes:

Yes sir. Like my old buddy Frank P. use to say. You don't steer it, you guide it. Steam and Gas powered Road Rollers come under the same category. What kind of pressure do they let you run it at these days. Or are you due for boiler work? Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)

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Quote,

"What kind of pressure do they let you run it at these days"

I asked that question ar a Steam train museum and the answer for trains was, we never derate them, we always operate them at the original operating pressure or rebuild them.

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Around here a state boiler inspector would come around every year and de-rate the boilers on traction engines and such. I could see where that would not work well with Steam Locomotives that need to have full pressure to pull a load of cars and get where you are going on time. Dandy Dave!

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Spent some time in Scotland courtesy of the USN and the shows there always had traction engines. The big brassy showman's engines were a thrill to see in action at these events. We've attended some good ones in England and I believe the event at Dorsett is one of the largest. I can also remember the Crich National Tramway museum event as being really spectacular. All my pics from those days are on 335mm slides so can't upload any here, but the internet is loaded with exciting stuff. Great memories.

Terry

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One Amish family in our area still uses a steam traction engine for threshing. They also use it to sterilize the soil of their veggie garden. They built a 10' or so square box thru which they direct steam as they drag the box over the ground.

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This is the 1907 60HP Case engine I bought in April of 1989.

Chain steering is actually quite easy as long as whatever it is you are steering is moving.

When you see guys spinning the steering wheel like a Whirling Dervish you can tell they need more experience at the wheel.

One needs to start turning well ahead of the actual turn and as long as you don't try to over steer for your speed steering is quite easy........although I wouldn't want to make figure eights....... :rolleyes:

Yes sir. Like my old buddy Frank P. use to say. You don't steer it, you guide it. Steam and Gas powered Road Rollers come under the same category. What kind of pressure do they let you run it at these days. Or are you due for boiler work? Dandy Dave!

Dave, back when I had it I got a 125# inspection (double row lap seam).

The engine left the factory rated 60 belt horsepower @ 130# so I felt pretty good about that.

That engine went to Florida and I'm glad I sold it when I did or I'm afraid I'd have wound up owning a huge paperweight after a certain incident that shook up boiler laws.

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