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1953 Plymouth Brake Light Switch

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We own a 1953 Plymouth Cranbrook Club Coupe. Our problem resides with the brake light switch. The brake light switch is a hydraulically swich which operates from the pressure internal to the brake line just removed from the master cylinder. The switch works but it takes considerable pressure to make it work. My service manual does not address what pressure it takes to activate (turn on) the switch. Anyone have any ideas as to how the activation pressure may be lowered? Or, alternatively, does anyone have a source for a replacement switch? Any help is appreciated.

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As far as I know, the switches are not adjustable. Replacements are available from the usual old Mopar vendors: Bernbaum, Roberts, etc. Since that type of switch was used on lots of cars for lots of years, I bet you can get a replacement at a NAPA store as well.

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Thanks for the help. I will try to source a replacement switch and see if that solves the problem.<BR>C.bandy

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Installed the new switch today and all is well. Thanks for the input. smile.gif" border="0

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On 8/24/2019 at 2:54 PM, Dman73 said:

Got a 53 Concord fastback and brake lights stay on all time 

 

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12 minutes ago, Dman73 said:

 

Some of the brake light switches were screwed in to the brake master cylinder and operate on pressure in the brake line. You can check to see if the switch is always in the on condition.  This type of switch has two wires connected to it.  Disconnect one and if the lights go out that’s it.

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Posted (edited)

You would probably get a faster response if you started your own topic on this forum or down below under Plymouth, rather than hi-jacking another persons topic.

While I was typing TerryB may have answered your question.  Still one topic and question per thread is normal courtesy.

Good Luck.

Edited by Tinindian (see edit history)

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Just for the record, there is no such thing as a 1953 Concord fastback, you have a 1951 or 1952. If your master cylinder is functioning normally and is not gunked up and holding pressure all the time, replace the switch. 

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These pressure switches were common to a lot of cars. Last car I know of to use them was VW beetle and super beetle in the seventies. I have bought a switch for a 74 beetle and used it in an old american car, don't remember the details it was a long time ago.

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10 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

These pressure switches were common to a lot of cars. Last car I know of to use them was VW beetle and super beetle in the seventies. I have bought a switch for a 74 beetle and used it in an old american car, don't remember the details it was a long time ago.

 

I think they might still be used on some motorcycles. The main thing is that, last I checked, they are common enough to still be in stock at your local better auto supply store.

 

On 8/24/2019 at 1:54 PM, Dman73 said:

Got a 53 Concord fastback and brake lights stay on all time 

 

I don't have a parts book new enough for a '53 Plymouth but assuming it uses the same switch as the late '40s Plymouth then here is a cross reference for it: https://www.ply33.com/Parts/group8#920355

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1953/54 Plymouth's brake light switches were polarized.... using  male and female bullet connectors on the switch...1/8" pipe threaded fitting. 

1951 and back used two female bullet connectors..1/8" pipe threaded fitting

Brake Lite Switch1953-54 Mopar.jpg

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