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Can anyone please tell me if they know anything about this Chevy??

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Ok so this is my grandfathers car which he had for about 40 years. It's a 1956 Sedan Delivery. style 56-1271, body 2814 (not 100% sure). That is about all I know about the car it self. What's so different about is is the rear window. As you all know, these vehicles come as panels. The more rare variant of this is the model is the "windowed" version and I know there is less than 100 of them. But the windows on that variant are completely different than the one he has.

He stopped driving it around 20 years ago I think. It needed a new bodymounts so it has been sitting for that reason. I am not sure why it is all torn apart but he has all the pieces in the basement. The engine is a 350 from 1970 which has solid lifters, solid cams and is bored out. T10 4 speed as well. The driveshaft is rusted on and he could not get anyone wanting to work on it back in the day so that's anther reason why it sat.

I want him to restore it and enjoy it but we've always wondered what it actually is. Is it some kind of rare option with the windows like that or did someone do some kind of custom fab job back in the 70s before he bought it? He said he only seen one like it in his whole life and it was in a magazine and apparently it was some kind of NJ turnpike service/work vehicle so that is why I believe it has to be stock from the factory.

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Those rear side windows look like they've been cut into the side panels after the car was in service. The perimeter rubber gasket is similar/same as what you find on older pickup rear windows before they went with the modern glued-in back glass.

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I have seen a '56 like it with the same windows used as an ambulance.

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hmm, interesting. so would that make it more or less valuable? The windows are currently cracked so if it was restored then I'm not sure how modern glass would affect the value.

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​In my opinion the. Value decreases when you change the factory design. Wayne

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My guess is it was a fleet vehicle and the windows were put in to suit the user's application. I can tell you this- if you restore the car and leave that busted glass in, value will decrease significantly.

They weren't concerned with future value when this car was made as the SD was really a bottom-feeder, a working vehicle designed to be used up and then scrapped. That's why few survived. When Ranchero and Econoline/Corvan/A100-type vehicles appeared, the SD became redundant and obsolete.

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Could have been a special order or built later on. I have seen a 56 SD with a wagon type tailgate and have owned a 56 ambulance with this type of window installed. Very unusual car and worth restoring correctly. Ed Dade City,Fl

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Looks like the windows are just flat glass. Getting new ones cut from safety glass should not be a big deal. Being it is a Family car, I would fix it the way your Granddad likes it and keep it in the family. Value is only a consideration if you are selling. Dandy Dave!

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This is a 1956 Handyman Wagon, Same tailgate design but with windows. This car has no back seat, and like a panel delivery, has a flat floor from the rear of the seat to the tailgate. PS, sorry about the poor cell photo.

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I agree that it is a good family car to preserve memories but having said that I doubt it will ever have any significant value. It will always be just an old car and never a classic. Wayne

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I just hope it's not too far gone to restore at this point. The body and frame are both very rusted. I guess those rear windows just makes it an odd ball. I would love to see it on the road again. I'm assuming it would take $25,000 easy to get it mechanically sound. Aren't the chassis the same on all the chevy 150s? I have a feeling that the engine would need a rebuild as well. It has been sitting with the carb opened so probably all dust and dirt got in there. Converting it to EFI might take some of the headaches away.

He had it since 1972 so it would be silly to just get rid of it now. I believe he only paid 500 dollars for it back in the day if you can believe that.

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Yes the sedan delivery's were built on the passenger car frame, and shared the same platform as the two-door wagons. 1960 was the last year for production for Chevrolet, last year for full size El Camino and also the last year for the two door station wagon. I know that they used the same bucket seat frames that were in the late 30's Chevrolets. I came upon a 60 Sedan Delivery on I-81 in northern Virginia about 15 years ago while driving my son down to college. It was for sale and really a true lo mileage barn find, I was in the thick of tuitions and it just could not fit into the picture, they are super rare to find especially in restored to original condition. The 55-57 ones are more common, the advent of the V-8 carry-all (surburban) pretty much took over their market share. The one I saw was used by a funeral home to transport corpses.

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You do have the advantage that 55 56 and 57 Chevs have about the best aftermarket parts supply of any car in the world.

If you decide to fix it up, it would be easier and cheaper not to be too concerned with authenticity. After all the original engine is gone and who knows what else.

Depending how badly rusted the chassis is, you might be better off to buy a replacement from some junkyard in the Southwest or west that is in good shape. Or, restore the one you have if you can.

It would probably be better and cheaper to get a used engine and trans out of a later model car or pickup truck.

Body repair panels, trim, upholstery etc are available from specialist Chev parts suppliers.

Depending how much work you want to do yourself it might be quite feasible to put the old girl back in commission. But if you have to hire mechanics and bodymen for everything it would cost a fortune.

If you decide to get rid of it I am sure someone would be glad to buy it and fix it up even though they would have to spend more on it than it would ever be worth.

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Looking at the pictures it does not look that rusty to me. I have fixed way worse. I seriously doubt the frame is rusty enough to weaken it, although it may have surface rust and even some pitting. If it is cleaned and painted it should be good as new.

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Think John was referencing full-size SD and 2-door wagons, as the 64-65 Chevelle line had a 2-door wagon and all Vega wagons were 2-doors. We had one of the Vega wagons in my highschool driver's ed program. My best bud and I worked as DE aides our senior year and guys our size (6-3 though we were only about 160 lbs back then) found it to be a cramped little beastie.

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Looks like it has a later model V-8 in it. Alternator and an aluminum manifold with a PCV valve. I wonder what transmission is? I doubt it is still a powerglide. Not an original carb either.

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Biscayne John and Rocketraider...you are correct. Sorry for the miscue on the Vega sedan delivery.

No problem, I should have been more specific, I was referring to the full size platform, I am well aware of the Vega's as you can see from the cars listed in my signature I own a few "H" body cars also

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